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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Burak Erkut, Tugberk Kaya, Marco Lehmann-Waffenschmidt, Mandeep Mahendru, Gagan Deep Sharma, Achal Kumar Srivastava and Mrinalini Srivastava

The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrative framework bringing together results from neuroplasticity and decision-making from a neuroscience perspective with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrative framework bringing together results from neuroplasticity and decision-making from a neuroscience perspective with those from market plasticity, i.e. with which practices market actors shape markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Provided that developments in neuroscience indicate that training the brain for orientation toward efficient decision-making processes under uncertainty is possible, an in-depth analysis can be conducted by using the integrative framework, which was set up by the authors for advancing research efforts in neuroeconomics and neurofinance on these lines.

Findings

Markets have a plastic character; they can change shape and form and remain in that way thereafter. The marketers have always been causing this change to succeed in their marketing strategies and efforts. Plasticity, hitherto considered by marketing, market sociology and evolutionary economics, has a potential in financial decision-making processes, especially regarding its role in training the brain for stable financial decisions.

Research limitations/implications

The theoretical approach can be incorporated for delivering an alternative representation of the knowledge processes associated with financial decisions.

Practical implications

The practical approach can be used for improving the practical aspects of financial decision-making processes.

Originality/value

The contribution is the first of its kind which integrates neuroscience approaches of plasticity and decision-making with the concept of market plasticity from the literature on economics and management, showing their similarities and opening a new front of discussion on how these two approaches can learn from each other to increase the explanatory power of financial decision-making processes and to gain new insights for financial decision makers on how to make more efficient financial decisions in the times of uncertainty.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

L.J. Sluys, M. Cauvern and R. De Borst

The dispersive behaviour of waves in softening problems is analysed.Attention is focused on the influence of the numerical scheme on thedispersion characteristics in the…

Abstract

The dispersive behaviour of waves in softening problems is analysed. Attention is focused on the influence of the numerical scheme on the dispersion characteristics in the process of localization of deformation. Distinction has been made between softening models defined in a standard plasticity framework and in a gradient‐dependent plasticity theory. Waves in a standard softening plasticity continuum do not disperse but due to spatial discretization dispersion is introduced which results in a mesh size dependent length scale effect. On the other hand, wave propagation in a gradient‐dependent softening plasticity continuum is dispersive. By carrying out the dispersion analysis on the discretized system the influence of numerical dispersion on material dispersion can be quantified which enables us to determine the accuracy for the solution of the localization zone. For a modelling with and without the inclusion of strain gradients accuracy considerations with respect to mass discretization, finite element size, time integration scheme and time step have been carried out.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Business Plasticity through Disorganization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-211-0

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Xiang Yu, Degao Zou, Xianjing Kong and Long Yu

A large, uneven settlement that is unfavourable to dam safety can occur between a concrete cut-off wall and the high-plasticity clay of earth core dam built on alluviums…

Abstract

Purpose

A large, uneven settlement that is unfavourable to dam safety can occur between a concrete cut-off wall and the high-plasticity clay of earth core dam built on alluviums. This issue has been often studied using the small-strain finite element (FE) method in previous research. This paper aims to research the interaction behaviour between a concrete cut-off wall and high-plasticity clay using large-deformation FE analyses.

Design/methodology/approach

The re-meshing and interpolation technique with a small-strain (RITSS) method was performed using an independently developed program and adopted for large-deformation FE analyses, and a suitable element size for the high-plasticity clay region was suggested. The layered construction process of an earth core dam built on thick alluviums was simulated using the RITSS method incorporating a hyperbolic model for soil.

Findings

The RITSS method is an effective technique for simulating the soil–structure interaction during dam construction. The RITSS analysis predicted a higher maximum principle stress of the concrete cut-off wall and higher stress levels in the high-plasticity clay region than small-strain FE analysis.

Originality/value

A practical method for large-deformation FE analysis was advised and was used for the first time to study the interaction between a concrete cut-off wall and high-plasticity clay in dam engineering. Large deformation in the high-plasticity clay was handled using the RITSS method. Moreover, the penetration process of the concrete cut-off wall into the high-plasticity clay was captured using a favourable element shape and mesh density.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

G. Etse and K. Willam

Presents a computational algorithm for the numerical integration of triaxial concrete plasticity formulations. The specific material formulation at hand is the so‐called…

Abstract

Presents a computational algorithm for the numerical integration of triaxial concrete plasticity formulations. The specific material formulation at hand is the so‐called extended leon model for concrete. It is based on the flow theory of plasticity which entails isotropic hardening as well as fracture energy‐based softening in addition to non‐associated plastic flow. The numerical algorithm resorts to implicit integration according to the backward Euler strategy that enforces plastic consistency according to the closes‐point‐projection method (generalized radial‐return strategy). Numerical simulations illustrate the overall performance of the proposed algorithm and the significant increase of the convergence rate when the algorithmic tangent is used in place of the continuum operator.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Dale Richards

The ability for an organisation to adapt and respond to external pressures is a beneficial activity towards optimising efficiency and increasing the likelihood of…

Abstract

Purpose

The ability for an organisation to adapt and respond to external pressures is a beneficial activity towards optimising efficiency and increasing the likelihood of achieving set goals. It can also be suggested that this very ability to adapt to one's surroundings is one of the key factors of resilience. The nature of dynamically responding to sudden change and then to return to a state that is efficient may be termed as possessing the characteristic of plasticity. Uses of agent-based systems in assisting in organisational processes may have a hand in facilitating an organisations' plasticity, and computational modelling has often been used to try and predict both agent and human behaviour. Such models also promise the ability to examine the dynamics of organisational plasticity through the direct manipulation of key factors. This paper discusses the use of such models in application to organisational plasticity and in particular the relevance to human behaviour and perception of agent-based modelling. The uses of analogies for explaining organisational plasticity is also discussed, with particular discussion around the use of modelling. When the authors consider the means by which the authors can adopt theories to explain this type of behaviour, models tend to focus on aspects of predictability. This in turn loses a degree of realism when we consider the complex nature of human behaviour, and more so that of human–agent behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology and approach used for this paper is reflected in the review of the literature and research.

Findings

The use of human–agent behaviour models in organisational plasticity is discussed in this paper.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is based on the importance of considering the human–agent-based models. When compared to agent-based model approaches, analogy is used as a narrative in this paper.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Eduardo N. Dvorkin, Alberto M. Cuitiño and Gustavo Gioia

A concrete material model is presented. The model is based on non‐associated plasticity for the pre‐failure and ductile post‐failure regimes and fracture (smeared crack…

Abstract

A concrete material model is presented. The model is based on non‐associated plasticity for the pre‐failure and ductile post‐failure regimes and fracture (smeared crack approach) for the brittle post‐failure regime. The implementation of the constitutive model in the 2‐D elements of a general purpose non‐linear incremental finite element code is discussed. Some important numerical features of the implementation are the implicit integration of the stress/strain relation and the use of an efficient symmetric stiffness formulation for the equilibrium iterations.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2020

Davide Secchi

The paper aims to use part of the distributed cognition literature to study how employees cope with organizational plasticity, in an attempt to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to use part of the distributed cognition literature to study how employees cope with organizational plasticity, in an attempt to identify the characteristics of cognitive plasticity.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence is collected by designing and implementing an agent-based computational simulation model (the IOP 2.0) where employees have the option to use external resources and the social environment to perform tasks. As plasticity is more effective when change and uncertainty are high, the simulation features an increase in the difficulty and number of tasks to which employees need to cope.

Findings

Cooperation and sharing of competence and ability are key to cognitive plasticity. Being able to master the use of some resources, together with other employees’ competencies, make some achieve the most efficient task performance.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that under conditions of change and plasticity, human resource management (HRM) shall attempt to develop measures to support employees' cognitive skills necessary to cope with it, for example, mostly through diagnosis, training and facilitating on-the-job dialogue.

Originality/value

This is the first study that attempts a merger between organizational cognition and plasticity, and it is the first to match its results to HRM policy recommendations.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2021

Maya Kroumova, Rakesh Mittal and Joshua Bienstock

This study aims to examine the complex relationship between the personality meta-traits of stability and plasticity and time-based work–family conflict (WFC). Stability…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the complex relationship between the personality meta-traits of stability and plasticity and time-based work–family conflict (WFC). Stability and plasticity are hypothesized to influence WFC directly and indirectly, via boundary strength at work (BSW) and boundary strength at home (BSH) domains. WFC has two dimensions – conflict due to family interfering in work (FIW) and conflict due to work interfering in family (WIF).

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 419 full-time employees in multiple US companies. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Stability was associated with lower levels of WFC and stronger boundaries around the work and home domains. BSW mediated the relationship between stability and FIW; BSH mediated the relationship between stability and WIF. plasticity was associated with weaker boundaries around the work and home domains. BSW and BSH had a negative relationship with FIW and WIF, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The study is cross-sectional and limited to time-based work–family conflict. The results support the adoption of a more agentic view of personality in the boundary setting and WFC literatures.

Practical implications

Employers need to design flexible work programs that offer employees control over work–home boundary strength.

Originality/value

The study links stability and plasticity to WFC. It expands the nomological network of work–home boundaries.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

A. CUITIÑO and M. ORTIZ

We provide a method for automatically extending small‐strain state‐update algorithms and their correspondent consistent tangents into the finite deformation range within…

Abstract

We provide a method for automatically extending small‐strain state‐update algorithms and their correspondent consistent tangents into the finite deformation range within the framework of multiplicative plasticity. The procedure, when it applies, operates at the level of kinematics and, hence, can be implemented once and for all independently of the material‐specific details of the constitutive model. The versatility of the method is demonstrated by a numerical example.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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