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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Zainab Riaz, David J. Edwards, Gary D. Holt and Tony Thorpe

Construction plant and equipment accident statistics suggest constant re‐evaluation of health and safety (H&S) systems is beneficial. This paper aims to process analyse…

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1855

Abstract

Purpose

Construction plant and equipment accident statistics suggest constant re‐evaluation of health and safety (H&S) systems is beneficial. This paper aims to process analyse plant and equipment H&S management systems on UK construction sites, with a view to applying information and communication technology (ICT) to them as an improvement mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

Five construction project case studies drawn from members of the former Major Contractors Group yield rich H&S process data. These are analysed using data flow diagram (DFD) techniques, to evaluate processes and proffer system improvements incorporating ICT.

Findings

Causes of unsafe practice regarding management of construction plant and equipment are found to include: aspects of the plant itself, management processes and operator competence. A new ICT “process paradigm” is suggested, the architecture of which incorporates mobile computing, automatic identification and data collection and a management information system.

Research limitations/implications

Findings contribute particularly to the fields of plant and equipment; and managing H&S.

Practical implications

Suggested ICT direction might form the basis of commercial interest in developing an all‐embracing H&S control mechanism for plant and equipment operations.

Originality/value

Application of DFD analysis in this setting is quite new.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Overview All organisations are, in one sense or another, involved in operations; an activity implying transformation or transfer. The major portion of the body of…

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2927

Abstract

Overview All organisations are, in one sense or another, involved in operations; an activity implying transformation or transfer. The major portion of the body of knowledge concerning operations relates to production in manufacturing industry but, increasingly, similar problems are to be found confronting managers in service industry. It is only in the last decade or so that new technology, involving, in particular, the computer, has encouraged an integrated view to be taken of the total business. This has led to greater recognition being given to the strategic potential of the operations function. In order to provide greater insight into operations a number of classifications have been proposed. One of these, which places operations into categories termed factory, job shop, mass service and professional service, is examined. The elements of operations management are introduced under the headings of product, plant, process, procedures and people.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Shamsuddin Ahmed

KKS is defined as Kraftwerk Kennzeichen System indicating process plant designation system. It is used to identify and classify equipment and components in process plant

Abstract

KKS is defined as Kraftwerk Kennzeichen System indicating process plant designation system. It is used to identify and classify equipment and components in process plant. Several systems of nomenclature are available. Two methods are widely used. One is the American system and the other is the European system. The European system is known as KKS and its taxonomy is comprehensive. The system provides a convenient method to identify plant equipment and its operation. It also covers the buildings and structures, thereby providing comprehensive identification within the system. The number allocated by the KKS system to equipment is broken down into a number of levels. There is a field or set of fields within each level and each field occupies a letter or a number according to a convention. It is shown how the KSS identification and classification system is used to develop database system for plant maintenance and management. The classification and identifications of plant equipment is taken as an example to show how the data structure is designed. The main thrust has been the equipment codification system in order to develop the database standards in information technology within energy industry.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 104 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

David J. Edwards and Gary D. Holt

A literature review is presented in the subject of construction plant and equipment management (CPeM) to: delineate the subject; consider its development over recent…

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2960

Abstract

Purpose

A literature review is presented in the subject of construction plant and equipment management (CPeM) to: delineate the subject; consider its development over recent years; and identify principal themes within it. The paper aims to close the gap in knowledge, by using these objectives as a mechanism to observe how research themes relate to primary CPeM functions, and to suggest future research direction.

Design/methodology/approach

A thematic review of CPeM academic literature (in the main, refereed journal papers published in English‐speaking countries over the last decade) is undertaken; the nature of identified themes is discussed, for instance, regarding why they might have evolved as they have; and based on the foregone, themes for future research in the field are proffered.

Findings

CPeM is found well established within the broader subject of construction management. Eight principal themes are identified, namely plant maintenance; downtime and productivity; optimisation; robotics and automation; health and safety; operators and competence; machine control; and “miscellaneous”.

Research limitations/implications

It is proffered that based on informational/technological advancements coupled with growing environmental/financial pressures, future CPeM research will strive to facilitate even greater plant reliability and safer modes of working. It is suggested that “optimum production methods” and “minimal resource consumption” will become inherent theme goals.

Originality/value

This is the first time that CPeM research has been consolidated and reviewed for publication in this manner.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

David J. Edwards, Junli Yang, Ruel Cabahug and Peter E.D. Love

The productivity and output levels of construction plant and equipment depends in part upon a plant operator’s maintenance proficiency; such that a higher degree of…

Abstract

The productivity and output levels of construction plant and equipment depends in part upon a plant operator’s maintenance proficiency; such that a higher degree of proficiency helps ensure that machinery is maintained in good operational order. In the absence of maintenance proficiency, the potential for machine breakdown (and hence lower productivity) is greater. Using data gathered from plant and equipment experts within the UK, plant operators’ maintenance proficiency are modelled using a radial basis function (RBF) artificial neural network (ANN). Results indicate that the developed ANN model was able to classify proficiency at 89 per cent accuracy using 10 significant variables. These variables were: working nightshifts, new mechanical innovations, extreme weather conditions, planning skills, operator finger dexterity, years experience with a plant item, working with managers with less knowledge of plant/equipment, operator training by apprenticeship, working under pressure of time and duration of training period. It is proffered that these variables may be used as a basis for categorizing plant operators in terms of maintenance proficiency and, that their potential for influencing operator training programmes needs to be considered.

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2019

Austin Chike Otegbulu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the level of discrepancy in the valuation process adopted by valuers in the study area with a view to provide solution.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the level of discrepancy in the valuation process adopted by valuers in the study area with a view to provide solution.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on both structured questionnaire and content analysis of valuation reports. In total, 185 (41 percent) structured questionnaires were randomly distributed to practicing estate surveying firms; out of 450 firms in Lagos, 173 were retrieved and used for analysis. However, the content analysis was based on 54 valuation reports on plants and equipment to investigate the extent of compliance to valuation process, standard and best practices among practitioners.

Findings

The findings from the study show that most of the practitioners lack the expertise to carry out plant and machinery (P&M) valuation, and there is evidence of poor application of methodology and lack of adherence to standards.

Practical implications

The findings from this study will reinforce the need for specialization and enforcement of standard in plant and equipment valuation practice, which will enthrone consistency, uniformity and reliability.

Originality/value

This study is the first to deal with methodology lapses in plant and equipment valuation in the study area. Ashaolu (2016) worked on the inter-disciplinary nature of plant and equipment valuation, whereas Otegbulu and Babawale (2011) worked on valuer’s perception or potential sources of inaccuracy in P&M valuation in Nigeria.

Details

Property Management, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1989

D.M. McCutcheon and A.R. Wood

It is often assumed that firms with more experience using advancedmanufacturing technologies can implement new production equipment moreeasily because such experience…

Abstract

It is often assumed that firms with more experience using advanced manufacturing technologies can implement new production equipment more easily because such experience provides essential technical skills. Firms that perceive they lack these skills may be deterred from adopting complex new technologies. An empirical study was made to see how technical backgrounds actually affected implementation results when 31 Canadian firms adopted their first robots. The technical experience of plant staffs, system suppliers and production departments was assessed and compared with system start‐up times, reliability and reported management satisfaction. Greater experience among each of the contributing groups had different effects: more experienced designers and builders (both in‐house and hired) provided systems that started up faster but were no more reliable; more experience operating similar equipment did not improve start‐up duration but led to more reliable systems. Overall, good management of available technical resources was probably more important than having extensive technical experience.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

David J. Edwards and Gary D. Holt

Plant and equipment theft (PET) is inherent throughout the construction sector. Its effect places direct financial burden on those who have invested in such assets, but…

Abstract

Purpose

Plant and equipment theft (PET) is inherent throughout the construction sector. Its effect places direct financial burden on those who have invested in such assets, but additionally, induces “indirect” costs for many other stakeholders including project owners, plant hirers and construction managers. The paper's objective is to take and discuss a snapshot of PET, the overriding aim being to aid greater understanding of it and in particular, the application of (post‐theft) recovery technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

Descriptive case study data are considered along with informal, anecdotal evidence provided by practitioners. These data are qualitatively considered; observations are discussed; a model representation of PET and recovery is developed; and conclusions are drawn.

Findings

Plant and equipment thieves are shown to be audacious and determined, but it is identified that in addressing these characteristics, recent advances in plant security and recovery technologies (PSRT) have been significant. Arguably, PSRT are not being adopted as broadly as they should be to offset the PET problem.

Research limitations/implications

The formal model of PET might help inform future academic endeavour in the subject of plant and equipment management generally and PET specifically.

Practical implications

The model suggests that more widespread use of PSRT may not only help defeat plant thieves, but additionally help recover stolen assets and identify organised criminal networks.

Originality/value

The work is novel in setting and will be of interest to both academics and practitioners in the field.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

George K. Chako

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or…

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5470

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in their efforts to develop and market new products. Looks at the issues from different strategic levels such as corporate, international, military and economic. Presents 31 case studies, including the success of Japan in microchips to the failure of Xerox to sell its invention of the Alto personal computer 3 years before Apple: from the success in DNA and Superconductor research to the success of Sunbeam in inventing and marketing food processors: and from the daring invention and production of atomic energy for survival to the successes of sewing machine inventor Howe in co‐operating on patents to compete in markets. Includes 306 questions and answers in order to qualify concepts introduced.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

P.B. Ahamed Mohideen, M. Ramachandran and Rajam Ramasamy Narasimmalu

The purpose of this paper to develop a novel strategic approach to handle corrective maintenance procedure in the event of a breakdown/disruption of service. A proposal to…

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1211

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper to develop a novel strategic approach to handle corrective maintenance procedure in the event of a breakdown/disruption of service. A proposal to minimize the recovery time and the breakdown cost in the system in construction plant is presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The past plant breakdown records of a construction organization are considered for the analysis. From the previous breakdown records, a high level metric using Pareto analysis and the cause effect analysis is used to identify the main breakdown main codes (BMC) and the subsequent breakdown sub codes (BSC). Prioritized BMC and BSCs are used to formulate dedicated breakdown maintenance teams, which act swiftly in the event of the breakdown with the modified methods.

Findings

The study was conducted, on four different types of heavy lifting/earth moving/material handling system equipment, which are used to load/unload/haul and transport construction materials. Failure due to tyre puncture and allied problems contribute to maximum failure. A strategy plan to minimize this type of failure is proposed. With the identification of the most contributing BMCs and BSCs, it is further proposed to develop an “overall breakdown maintenance management”.

Research limitations/implications

The collected data pertains to the construction plant located in a particular region, namely the Middle East, and hence the proposed solution is dedicated/relatively applicable to similar plant from the same region. A more robust model can be suggested considering the work environment in the other regions.

Practical implications

The proposed methodology is highly adaptable by similar industries operating in the Middle East region.

Social implications

Construction plant and equipment contribute to the success of construction organizations, by providing enhanced output, reduced manpower requirement, ease of work and timely completion of the project. Delays in completion of projects generally have both social and economical impact on the contractors and the buyers. The proposed model will bring down the lead‐time of the project and enable the contractors to crash down their project completion time.

Originality/value

Numerous studies on preventive maintenance models and procedures are available for a system and in particular to construction plant maintenance in the literature. This model attempts to handle the issues of unpredictable breakdowns in the construction plant to minimise the breakdown time. The proposed model is a novel approach which enables a quick recovery of the construction plant, attributed from the breakdown parameters derived from the previous history of the work records/environment.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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