Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Hatice Aydin, Zeliha Eser and Sezer Korkmaz

The purpose of this paper is to examine the arousal of negative consumer emotions as a consequence of fast food consumption among individuals with restrained food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the arousal of negative consumer emotions as a consequence of fast food consumption among individuals with restrained food consumption. Furthermore, a moderating effect of socio-cultural pressure to buffer these relationships is positioned for the first time.

Design/methodology/approach

The field study is completed with data collected through an online survey among 353 customers by employing a random sampling technique. The collected data are analyzed through confirmatory factor analysis procedures.

Findings

The hypotheses related to the effects of fast food consumption on body image guilt and shame, body image guilt on planning diet and shame, moderator role of socio-cultural, in terms of shame, are accepted.

Research limitations/implications

A key limitation is data collected from individuals with restrained food consumption in Turkey which limits the generalizability of results to other countries and contexts.

Practical implications

The results call for paying attention to socio-cultural pressures that enhance shame.

Originality/value

The primary contribution of this paper lies in the fact that fast food consumption is scantly related to the arousal of negative consumer emotions. Furthermore, moderating effects of social pressures and Turkish context are also unique to this study.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2006

S. D. Ravana, S. Abdul Rahman and H. Y. Chan

Encouraging socio‐economic development in developing countries has resulted in many changes in the lifestyle of communities. Changes in dietary patterns are one of the…

Abstract

Encouraging socio‐economic development in developing countries has resulted in many changes in the lifestyle of communities. Changes in dietary patterns are one of the main outcomes from the rapid socio‐economics advancement, for example excessive intake of fat, high‐protein diet (animal protein), salt and preservatives. Chronic diseases such as diabetes, coronary artery disease, hypertension and cancer are mostly related to diet. With the community becoming more nutrition and health conscious, one of the challenges faced is to make sure that the information and knowledge on diet and healthy lifestyle gets across to the community. This paper presents a model of web‐based diet system (WebDIET) that attempts to make diet information and menu plans that are customised to local preference more accessible via the use of Internet. The system is to be used by dieticians who serve as administrators and the public who are the end users. The dietary standard adapted in developing the system is Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for Malaysia. The Malaysian Dietary Guidelines was also referred as it emphasises on Malaysian diet. The system consists of six modules namely Authentication Module, Menu Plan Module, Diabetic Menu Plan Module, Food Selection Module, Disease Info Module and Feedback Module. Diabetic menu plan module models the reasoning process employed by dieticians in suggesting menu plans. The planning task is solved using an artificial intelligence technique through the case‐based reasoning (CBR) approach. CBR, generally describes, the process of solving the current problem based on the proposed solution of similar problems in the past. Nearest Neighbour Algorithm was used to compute the similarities in weighted average. Tools used for the development of the system are Microsoft Visual Interdev, Microsoft FrontPage 2000, while HTML, VBScript and JavaScript are the scripting languages used to develop the system.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 2 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2018

Sadia Chishty, Monika and Nimali Singh

The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of nutrition and health counselling on quality of life (QoL) among celiac children (CC) aged 7-12 years, which was…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of nutrition and health counselling on quality of life (QoL) among celiac children (CC) aged 7-12 years, which was reported by the parent. So far, no study has emphasized on impact of nutritional counselling on QoL in CC. The QoL in the present study was reported by parents of celiac and non-celiac (NC) subjects.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an interventional study. Follow-up celiac cases aged 7-12 years (n = 50) were compared with NC cases (n = 25). A 24-item instrument was standardized for reliability and validity and was used to assess the QoL of children on a 100-score scale. The scale used four dimensions and explored physical, emotional, social and family outlook. The impact of health counselling using posters, leaflets and a booklet prepared on simplification of disease, gluten-free diet and its treatment was determined.

Findings

Total QoL scores were better in NC children (7-9 years), whereas celiac pre-adolescents (CP; 10-12 years) showed higher QoL scores than NC pre-adolescents. NC QoL scores were significantly higher than CC in emotional and mental domain (p < 0.02) and family outlook (p < 0.01). In CP, physical well-being (p < 0.01) and social well-being (p < 0.04) were significantly higher, whereas family outlook was significantly lower (p < 0.01). After repetitive counselling sessions, the CC had higher scores than their NC siblings. Postintervention QoL scores in CC (7-9 years) and pre-adolescents improved from 77.5 to 80.95 and from 80.16 to 83.75, respectively, and a significant positive shift was seen in family outlook (p < 0.05).

Originality/value

This study presents a comparative analysis on impact of nutrition counselling on QoL in Indian CC and their comparison with NC siblings matched for age.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Sabika Allehdan, Asma Basha and Reema Tayyem

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common complications of pregnancy. GDM is defined as glucose intolerance of variable severity with onset or first…

Abstract

Purpose

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common complications of pregnancy. GDM is defined as glucose intolerance of variable severity with onset or first recognition during pregnancy. The purpose of this paper is to produce information on prevalence, screening and diagnosis, pathophysiology and dietary, medical and lifestyle management of GDM.

Design/methodology/approach

This literature review aimed to document and record the results of the most updated studies published dealing with dietary, medical and lifestyle factors in managing GDM.

Findings

The prevalence of GDM differs worldwide based on population characteristics, race/ethnicity and diagnostic criteria. The pathophysiology of GDM is multifactorial and it is likely that genetic and environmental factors are associated with the occurrence of GDM. Medical nutritional therapy remains the mainstay of GDM management and aerobic and resistance physical activities are helpful adjunctive therapy when euglycemia is not attained by the medical nutritional therapy alone. When diet and exercise fail to achieve glycemic control, pharmacological agents such as insulin therapy and oral hypoglycemic medications are prescribed. Plasma glucose measurement is an essential part of glycemic control during pregnancy, as well as glycemic control can be evaluated using indicators of glycemic control such as hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), glycated albumin and fructosamine.

Originality/value

This review is a comprehensive review that illustrates the effect of healthy diet, medical therapy and lifestyle change on improving GDM condition.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Kai Ling Ang and Schubert Foo

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

Paul Fieldhouse

The importance of nutrition in the aetiology and treatment of disease has long been recognised. However, in general, medical education and practice has not kept abreast of…

Abstract

The importance of nutrition in the aetiology and treatment of disease has long been recognised. However, in general, medical education and practice has not kept abreast of the tremendous advances in nutritional knowledge. Authorities in many countries have commented on the inadequate recognition, support and attention given to the subject of nutrition in medical schools. The need for nutrition education to students and to practising doctors has been repeatedly emphasised in the USA, where steps have been taken to implement suitable programmes. In the United Kingdom scant attention has been directed toward an evaluation of the current situation and little has been achieved in promoting nutrition education within the medical profession.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 79 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 19 June 2018

Stuti Saxena

Marketing management.

Abstract

Subject area

Marketing management.

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate/Postgraduate.

Case overview

The present case is a disguised one and is meant to enable students to critically analyse the operations and functioning of a fitness centre located in a city. Despite a runaway success, “Fit in” was facing problems of time-management and members’ management. Thus, catering to the members was becoming unwieldy, especially with respect to providing the personalized experience to the members, which was their forte. Thus, Mukesh and Naina faced the challenge of motivating their existing members and getting fresh referrals. Should they cut some of their services? Should they make some changes in manpower management? Or, should they change the operating strategy for their business?

Expected learning outcomes

Expected learning outcomes are as follows: how to ensure customer loyalty in service organization settings and how to enhance motivation among the service customers.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS: 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1978

Alison Paul BSc and D.A.T. Southgate PhD

Alison Paul BSc (Nutrition) and D. A. T. Southgate PhD discuss the limitations and use of food composition tables. This is the second of two articles to mark the…

Abstract

Alison Paul BSc (Nutrition) and D. A. T. Southgate PhD discuss the limitations and use of food composition tables. This is the second of two articles to mark the publication of the fourth revised edition of McCance and Widdowson's The Composition of Food.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 78 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Vera Lúcia Valente Mesquita and Maria de Lourdes Reis Giada

In Brazil there is a lack of food composition data and the nutrition professionals frequently need to consult compiled tables of international reference. It is known that…

Abstract

Purpose

In Brazil there is a lack of food composition data and the nutrition professionals frequently need to consult compiled tables of international reference. It is known that the extrapolation of international food data to the regional level is not accurate and requires caution because it may result in nutritional problems. Thus, the purpose of this work was to determine and compare the organic‐mineral content of the main Brazilian cereals and legumes with those of the available reference in this country.

Design/methodology/approach

The chemical composition of the samples was examined according to AOAC methods. The energy value for each sample was calculated using the specific Atwater energy factors.

Findings

The moisture as well as lipids and ash content were found to accord with the consulted bibliography for most of the samples. The protein values were the same as those found by some authors and different from others.

Originality/value

The results obtained showed the need for elaborating a Brazilian food composition table able to better reproduce the real nutritive value of food produced in this country.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1994

Derek Mozley

Three events of significance to this country took place in 1899 – the British Food Journal was launched, Australia retained the Ashes, and the Boer War hostilities…

Abstract

Three events of significance to this country took place in 1899 – the British Food Journal was launched, Australia retained the Ashes, and the Boer War hostilities commenced. If challenged on the order of their importance, cricketers and Empire‐builders may be excused their preference. However, looking at it purely from the standpoint of pro bono publico, the dispassionate observer must surely opt for the birth of a certain publication as being ultimately the most beneficial of the three.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

1 – 10 of over 5000