Search results

1 – 10 of over 197000
Content available
Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2016

Bharati Mohapatra

Abstract

Details

Community Management of Urban Open Spaces in Developing Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-639-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2016

Bharati Mohapatra

Abstract

Details

Community Management of Urban Open Spaces in Developing Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-639-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2016

Bharati Mohapatra

Abstract

Details

Community Management of Urban Open Spaces in Developing Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-639-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Cathy Parker

The purpose of this Editorial is to introduce the subject of place management and, more specifically, the Journal of Place Management and Development.

Downloads
1733

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this Editorial is to introduce the subject of place management and, more specifically, the Journal of Place Management and Development.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is reflective, reflexive and indulgent. The Editorial examines the background to place management and summarises current practical and theoretical interpretations on the subject, that have been written by the JPMD Editorial Board.

Findings

The Editorial establishes the breadth of the topic of place management as well as making some tentative predictions about where research in the subject could or should go in the future.

Practical implications

The Editorial calls for more joint research between academics and practitioners, to ensure that research is academically grounded but practically relevant.

Originality/value

The Editorial is a good introduction to the subject of place management and should be read by academics or practitioners with an interest in the subject.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2016

Bharati Mohapatra

Abstract

Details

Community Management of Urban Open Spaces in Developing Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-639-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Nicholas Catahan and Helen Woodruffe-Burton

This is an exploratory and qualitative study to consider approaches to capture, analyse and monitor perceptions from big data, to inform and contribute to place management

Abstract

Purpose

This is an exploratory and qualitative study to consider approaches to capture, analyse and monitor perceptions from big data, to inform and contribute to place management research and practice of botanic gardens (BGs). This paper aims to address the ongoing significant threat to BGs due to funding being cut and the need to inform and develop sustainable revenue streams for their survival.

Design/methodology/approach

Guiding research questions for this study were: ‘What are the perceived strengths and areas for development for 2 BGs via a Leximancer Automatic Content Analysis (ACA) of TripAdvisor online reviews; and do they match BGs purpose of scientific research, conservation, display and education?’ A content analysis of 582 online reviews from 2007 to 2017 follows qualitative methodology techniques using a combination of manual and automatic text analysis (Leximancer text mining software). These approaches enabled a comparison of online TripAdvisor reviews with Likert-type or rating scale items of 1 to 5 stars.

Findings

Insights revealed the use of Leximancer and TripAdvisor (or similar innovations) as tools for potential place management, place marketing communications and monitoring purposes. Predominant perceptions extracted from reviews are not concerned with documented collections of living plants for the purposes of scientific discovery, conservation, display and education. Reviews clearly focus more upon aesthetics, facilities and services, which support previous studies. Overall, reviews highlighted positive sentiments towards the BGs.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations link to limited data across two BGs, synthesis and meaning of complex perceptions, matters of subjectivity and time needed to interpret information. Implications enable insights into BG “place” gleaned from big data in the form of user-generated content and electronic Word-Of-Mouth using Leximancer; viewed as a measure alongside management action plans. Future studies could strengthen debate and action regarding the use of Leximancer, and also public perception of BGs’ core functions, importance and value. The research supports potential to monitor and transform perceptions, values and beliefs. Outcomes could eventually inform policy and generate a much-needed shift in funds and resources for BGs by highlighting their relevance and value to society.

Originality/value

An empirical and methodological contribution via peer reviewed studies of visitor perceptions via online reviews of Britain’s BGs “place” and “space” analysed with Leximancer have never been published. This study critically explores potential visitor and place management needs of BGs. Managers can make better use of big data from social media platforms/digital channels, using a novel type of data analytical software like Leximancer for strategic planning; with more informed approaches to place management, innovation and development. A key contribution of this study is this ACA methodological approach for place management.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Fabiana Gondim Mariutti

Until now, scholars have devoted insufficient attention to theories of place reputation – at the city, region and country levels. Furthermore, the literature does suggest…

Abstract

Purpose

Until now, scholars have devoted insufficient attention to theories of place reputation – at the city, region and country levels. Furthermore, the literature does suggest a theoretical link between country reputation and country-of-origin (COO). To foster an alignment between country reputation and place management, this paper aims to trace the advance of country branding and nation branding, as deriving place management recommendations from studies on country reputation. Therefore, this work is grounded on the consistent principle in the current literature – that a place must first improve itself via development and management before it can create a positive reputation via communications; it is fundamental, geographically, to work on the development initiatives towards the improvement of a place.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper based on literature search on country reputation published in the past decade (2005-2015).

Findings

The analysis indicates that nine papers have been published on country reputation since 2005, but none of them deal with principles of place management. This paper also consolidates the field’s decades-long theoretical evolution into a visual diagram. To close, it concludes by highlighting the need for theoretical and managerial advancements involving principles from place reputation and place management, which could help countries achieve sustainable prosperity.

Research limitations/implications

As limitations, this conceptual paper lacks review of each country in the evolutionary timeline regarding country branding and nation branding. As another limitation, this paper focused specifically on theoretical contributions and did not address the administrative challenges implied by the sub-themes. Indeed, there is much complexity involved with aligning government policies with internal and external stakeholders.

Social implications

Inspire academia, government and citizens to be engaged with the sustainable prosperity of their country through initiatives of place management and development.

Originality/value

The present study provides additional evidence with respect to the evolution of COO to country reputation, considering studies on nation branding and country branding, towards place management. To date, this is the first publication that offers an extensive examination of country reputation. Thus, the principal theoretical implication of this study is that place management and place reputation can be aligned to develop and improve places (cities, regions and countries) for sustainable prosperity.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Craig Lance Grocke, Robyn Eversole and Clayton Jon Hawkins

This paper aims to draw on Seamon’s(2012a, 2012b, 2014, 2015, 2018) theories on the “processes of place attachment” to understand the influence of place attachment on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to draw on Seamon’s(2012a, 2012b, 2014, 2015, 2018) theories on the “processes of place attachment” to understand the influence of place attachment on community leadership and the management of four towns in the Barossa region of South Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology combines photo-elicitation, participant observation and in-depth interviews with 12 community leaders across four town groups. Scannell and Gifford’s(2010) tripartite model for place attachment is used to segment qualitative interview data to understand the nature of place attachment of community leaders. This was followed by thematic analysis using Seamon’s(2012a, 2014, 2018) six processes of place attachment to understand how the dynamics of place attachment as a series of processes interact to influence community leadership and place-based action.

Findings

The research revealed that community leaders in the Barossa region regularly confront a tension between the “Being” and “Becoming” of Place. It also suggests that place attachment for new residents is accelerated by engaging multiple place attachment processes; these can be measured using the research methodology in this study. The result is a tipping point where place leadership from new residents can accelerate towards the “Being of Place” showing a tendency towards protectionist behaviour commonly seen amongst long-term residents.

Research limitations/implications

Testing the findings in this paper in other rural regions and other cultural contexts will add further insight and validation of these findings. It is recommended that future research could further develop this approach through engaging multiple place-based community groups in the same town and across different locations to understand the pattern language of communities with more accuracy.

Practical implications

This study has enabled a deeper understanding of place-based community groups and their motivations to protect the status quo or promote change in the development and management of the place. Each community requires a tailored approach to place management and development to activate community resources and partnerships successfully. This research also provides knowledge on how to accelerate place attachment for new residents to improve their sense of belonging, value and purpose by engaging programs that engage all six place attachment processes.

Social implications

The research reveals that place relations are dynamic, complex and often political. Rural towns display a pattern language for how they engage networks and resources that government needs to understand to engage community stewardship of place – its social, environmental and economic setting. This research offers a method to better understand the pattern language of place attachment that drives community leadership and place management to help communities sustain themselves and adapt to change.

Originality/value

The research explores the inter-relationship between the place attachment of community leaders and their response to change from different types of community impacts such as bushfires or the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding these processes is valuable in informing place management partnerships between community, business and government.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

John Mant

This paper aims to deal with place management, not as an additional function to traditional silo organisations, but as a core part of a government that has been…

Downloads
835

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deal with place management, not as an additional function to traditional silo organisations, but as a core part of a government that has been restructured to achieve complex outcomes, such as place management. The work is based on the author's experience over the last couple of decades, both as a departmental head and a change management consultant.

Design/methodology/approach

Instead of government consisting essentially of functional departments, each one consisting of a different group of professionals pursuing specialist inputs and outputs, an outcomes focused government is structured around the three core aspects of governance – effectiveness (outcomes), efficiency (services) and transparency (standards). The three parts have different ways of operating and different types of performance measure.

Findings

Place management along with systems management are the essential responsibilities of the outcomes organisation.

Research limitations/implications

Rather than advocate traditional inputs and outputs, outcome managers are free to pursue a wide range of solutions from a number of different providers. Being highly visible to the community place managers especially provide a clear point of contact for all those with an interest in the place, whilst buck passing opportunities are limited. Budgeting can be shifted to the funding of outcomes rather than inputs or outputs, with increased power for elected officials to review a wider range of expenditure. Outcomes management provides opportunities for bottom‐up solutions, rather than reliance on top‐down coordinating committees of silo organisations.

Originality/value

The paper should provide those struggling with the limitations of place management in traditional structures with a model for the more effective governance of places.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 197000