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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Linda Lisa Maria Turunen and Pirjo Laaksonen

The aim of this study is to deepen the understanding of luxury consumption by comparing the meanings and the attributes of counterfeit branded products and luxury goods.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to deepen the understanding of luxury consumption by comparing the meanings and the attributes of counterfeit branded products and luxury goods.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is an interpretative qualitative research in which the meanings and essence of luxury and counterfeit goods are uncovered by written stories. The photo‐ethnographical method was used to generate the stories.

Findings

Consumers regard both luxury goods and counterfeits as being at different levels and of different quality ranging from poor to excellent. Counterfeits possess mainly social meanings, whereas authentic luxury goods may also operate on a personal level. However, consumers do not perceive luxury and counterfeit branded products as counterparts; counterfeits can be regarded as the embodiment of luxury, whereas non‐brand products are rather the opposite. Moreover, the existence of authenticity is perceived to be a vital connective and distinctive factor among luxury and counterfeit branded products.

Originality/value

The research aspires to shed light on the essence of counterfeit and luxury goods by comparing them in an effort to gain better understanding of the luxury phenomenon as a whole.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Jenniina Halkoaho and Pirjo Laaksonen

The purpose of this paper is to understand what Christmas gifts mean to children by examining the features and styles of the letters that children write to Santa Claus.

1999

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand what Christmas gifts mean to children by examining the features and styles of the letters that children write to Santa Claus.

Design/methodology/approach

Contents and style of 314 authentic letters sent by UK children to Santa Claus were analyzed using an underlying interpretive consumer research approach.

Findings

Letters to Santa contain expressions of needs, wants, desires, hopes and dreams related to Christmas. The majority of letters were identified as expressions of wants and desires, while only a few letters contained features of needs or dreaming. This implies that for children Christmas seems to be a rather unspiritual festival concerning having things rather than dreams coming true.

Research limitations/implications

The generalization of findings is limited to Western welfare societies. Letters are not originally written for research purposes, and therefore lack background information about the writers and their writing situations.

Practical implications

Analysis of letters to Santa offers an opportunity to identify the spirit of postmodern consumption with its contradictory aspects, and understand children as consumers. It is essential to recognize and understand the nature of the desires of today's children as they are an influential set of consumers.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights about the contemporary Christmas gift giving from the point of view of children. Contrary to previous studies, the central focus of the analysis is on gift request styles and letters as meaningful entities, not just on product categories or brands as such.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Hanna Leipämaa‐Leskinen, Henna Jyrinki and Pirjo Laaksonen

The purpose of this paper is to identify which consumption practices young adults regard as necessary. Recently, necessity consumption has not attracted the interest of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify which consumption practices young adults regard as necessary. Recently, necessity consumption has not attracted the interest of consumer researchers, even though it serves as an important concept for studying the fundamentals of consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are based on consumption diaries in which young adults reported their consumption practices during one week and then rated the degree to which they experienced each of these practices as a necessity or luxury on a seven‐point scale. The data collection was conducted in January 2011. The sample consisted of 55 Finnish university students and the total number of practices they reported in the diaries was 3,847. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.

Findings

The results show that young adults experienced almost 60 per cent of their consumption practices as necessary. However, the boundaries between necessary consumption and luxury consumption appeared to be fluid. Accordingly, five groups of consumption practices were identified on the basis of their necessity/luxury ratings, and three of these groups included necessity practices of different levels.

Originality/value

The results show that young adults define necessity consumption differently in different situations. Also, the importance of social activities was evident in all three groups of necessity practices. To conclude, the authors suggest that the developed empirical model should be tested further in different contexts, especially regarding the situational factors, as it provides a fruitful starting point for studying necessity consumption.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2014

Henna Syrjälä, Hanna Leipämaa-Leskinen and Pirjo Laaksonen

This paper examines in what ways cultural representations of money reveal deprivation and empowerment in poverty.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines in what ways cultural representations of money reveal deprivation and empowerment in poverty.

Methodology/approach

The study draws on Finnish poor consumers’ narratives of their daily lives to identify the discursive practices involved in money talk. Poverty is seen as a frame in which the tacit cultural knowledge of money and the ways of enacting discursive practices are sustained and produced.

Findings

The research constructs a theoretical illustration of consumer empowerment and deprivation in poverty, which is based on four discursive practices: Moneyless is powerless, Capricious money, Wrestling with money, and Happiness cannot be bought with money. The illustration shows the dynamic evolution of empowerment and deprivation as they grow from and vary within the discursive practices.

Social implications and value

The study highlights the practical carrying out of life in poverty, which does not emerge only as deprived or as empowered, but instead involves a tension between them.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-158-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Henna Syrjälä, Hanna Leipämaa-Leskinen and Pirjo Laaksonen

– This paper aims to show how social needs – the need for integration and need for distinctiveness – guide Finnish young adults’ mundane consumption behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show how social needs – the need for integration and need for distinctiveness – guide Finnish young adults’ mundane consumption behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws on literature on the fundamental importance of social needs for people’s social well-being and the healthy development of the young. The research uses qualitative methods, leaning on an interpretive approach that regards social needs as subjectively experienced and socially constructed phenomena. The empirical data were sourced from 56 Finnish university students’ narratives on their daily consumption behaviors.

Findings

The findings present five categories: “Socializing through consumption”, “Consuming to affiliate”, “Uniqueness through consumption”, “Consuming to show off” and “Obedient consumption”, which are further linked to social needs.

Social implications

The study opens up the ways social needs are connected to consumption behaviors, for example showing how quotidian consumption objects, such as branded clothes, may be used to satisfy social needs in a way that enables young adults to make independent and distinctive consumption choices. On the other hand, in regard to young consumers’ psychological and social well-being, the study finds that striving to satisfy social needs could also lead to destructive behaviors, such as alcohol consumption.

Originality/value

The current research highlights the unavoidable importance of social needs in young adults’ mundane consumption and how they strive to satisfy them. Thereby, it yields implications for social well-being by shedding light on the pressures and possibilities faced by young adults in their everyday life.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Brian Young

411

Abstract

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Dr Brian Young

174

Abstract

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2014

Abstract

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-158-9

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Brian Young

148

Abstract

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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