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Article
Publication date: 22 January 2018

Elizabeth Mansfield, Onil Bhattacharyya, Jennifer Christian, Gary Naglie, Vicky Steriopoulos and Fiona Webster

Canada’s primary care system has been described as “a culture of pilot projects” with little evidence of converting successful initiatives into funded, permanent programs…

Abstract

Purpose

Canada’s primary care system has been described as “a culture of pilot projects” with little evidence of converting successful initiatives into funded, permanent programs or sharing project outcomes and insights across jurisdictions. Health services pilot projects are advocated as an effective strategy for identifying promising models of care and building integrated care partnerships in local settings. In the qualitative study reported here, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the strengths and challenges of this approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 34 primary care physicians who discussed their experiences as pilot project leads. Following thematic analysis methods, broad system issues were captured as well as individual project information.

Findings

While participants often portrayed themselves as advocates for vulnerable patients, mobilizing healthcare organizations and providers to support new models of care was discussed as challenging. Competition between local healthcare providers and initiatives could impact pilot project success. Participants also reported tensions between their clinical, project management and research roles with additional time demands and skill requirements interfering with the work of implementing and evaluating service innovations.

Originality/value

Study findings highlight the complexity of pilot project implementation, which encompasses physician commitment to addressing care for vulnerable populations through to the need for additional skill set requirements and the impact of local project environments. The current pilot project approach could be strengthened by including more multidisciplinary collaboration and providing infrastructure supports to enhance the design, implementation and evaluation of health services improvement initiatives.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Shuxian Feng and Toshiya Yamamoto

This research aimed to determine the differences and similarities in each pilot project to understand the primary design forms and concepts of sponge city concept (SCC…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aimed to determine the differences and similarities in each pilot project to understand the primary design forms and concepts of sponge city concept (SCC) projects in China. It also aimed to examine ten pilot projects in Shanghai to extrapolate their main characteristics and the processes necessary for implementing SCC projects effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review and field survey case study were employed. Data were mostly collected through a field survey in Shanghai, focusing on both the projects and the surrounding environment. Based on these projects' examination, a comparative method was used to determine the characteristics of the ten pilot SCC projects and programs in Shanghai.

Findings

Six main types of SCC projects among 30 pilot cities were classified in this research to find differences and similarities among the pilot cities. Four sponge design methods were classified into ten pilot projects. After comparing each project size using the same geographical size, three geometrical types were categorized into both existing and new city areas. SCC project characteristics could be identified by combining four methods and three geometrical types and those of the SCC programs by comparing the change in land-use and the surrounding environment in ten pilot projects.

Originality/value

The results are valuable for implementing SCC projects in China and elsewhere and future research on the impact of SCC projects.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

S. Vinodh, G. Sundararaj, S.R. Devadasan, S. Rajanayagam and Immanuel Edinbarough

The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility of adopting a pilot project approach for foreseeing the working and financial viability of a technique, named as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility of adopting a pilot project approach for foreseeing the working and financial viability of a technique, named as agile innovative total quality function deployment (agile ITQFD).

Design/methodology/approach

The agile ITQFD technique and its financial accounting system were designed. The implementation study of two pilot projects on agile ITQFD was conducted in an electronics switches manufacturing company. The statements of the financial accounting system were used to foresee the financial viability of agile ITQFD projects.

Findings

The research reported in this paper indicates the feasibility of adopting a pilot project approach and its financial accounting system for test implementing new techniques and models in the organisations aspiring to attain global competitiveness.

Research limitations/implications

Like many other modern organisations, the company in which the research work was carried out has been aspiring to compete globally. Hence, even though the implementation study involved only two pilot projects, the implications of this research would represent the global scenario as well.

Practical implications

Currently practitioners struggle to choose the best techniques for applying them in specific cases. The research reported in this paper would help practitioners in this regard to adopt the pilot project approach and its financial accounting system.

Originality/value

The pilot project approach reported in this paper helps a company save time and money while exploring the practical compatibility of the technique. The financial accounting system presented would be useful in foreseeing the viability of projects using monetary values.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Beverly Brown, Cynthia Found and Merle McConnell

This paper seeks to describe a pilot project for the Federal Science eLibrary to measure the impacts on Government of Canada researchers when provided with seamless…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to describe a pilot project for the Federal Science eLibrary to measure the impacts on Government of Canada researchers when provided with seamless, equitable access to an expanded core of electronic journals in science, technology and medicine (STM). The Federal Science eLibrary is an initiative supported by the Strategic Alliance of Federal Science and Technology Libraries to provide improved access to information at the desktop for the 22,000 Canadian federal scientists, policy analysts and decision makers. The pilot project was designed to evaluate the benefits of increased access to e‐journals at the pilot sites and test network performance in connecting to a central digital repository.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 500 users in three Canadian government sites with limited access to electronic resources were provided with full text access to a digital repository of over 3,000 e‐journals over a 12‐week period. Questionnaires, teleconferences, usage statistics and e‐mail correspondence were used to gather and measure researchers' response and show impacts on their ability to do their work.

Findings

Pilot groups reported significantly reduced time finding and verifying information. Time saved was redirected into critical activities such as research, laboratory activities, manuscript preparation, peer review activities and professional reading. Participants found that increased desktop access had a very positive impact on their ability to do their work.

Originality/value

This study shows the benefits of expanded access to electronic journals for federal government scientists through a Federal Science eLibrary initiative.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Fergus Lyon and Mark Ramsden

To explore what type of support is required by social enterprises, how this is different from mainstream business, what the preferred approaches to learning and working…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore what type of support is required by social enterprises, how this is different from mainstream business, what the preferred approaches to learning and working with support providers are, and how the provision of social enterprise support can be co‐ordinated and the capacity of support providers built up.

Design/methodology/approach

The study examined the different approaches and indicators used in conventional evaluations of social enterprises. Uses the literature and the views of those delivering support for the pilot projects to identify indicators to include social enterprises’ perceptions of the process of support provision, changes in their operations and behaviour and the extent of constraints faced. Describes the three pilot projects, comprising: Areas of Industrial Decline (Ex‐coalfield areas) pilot project, based on work with 11 eleven existing and 4 pre‐start social enterprises in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, UK, exploring the use of tools developed for conventional micro‐businesses; Black, minority and ethnic fledgling social enterprises pilot project, involving 14 social enterprises in the West Midlands, emphasizing those managed by Black Asian Minority Ethnic (BAME) women; and Rural social enterprise pilot project, which provided advisory support to 14 organizations in Lancashire and Oxfordshire on organization structure, management and legal structures.

Findings

The results revealed the importance of meeting those technical skill gaps that are easier to identify plus those that are harder to define (lack of confidence). Concludes that social enterprises may be confused about types of support available, particularly where duplication and competition takes place.

Originality/value

Draws on the author’s official evaluation of three pilot projects that were jointly run by the Department for Education and Skills (DfES), Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), Home Office and Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM).

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Yoshida Yoshizaki Hugo Tsugunobu, da Cunha Cláudio Barbieri, Ribeiro Giacon Joice, Almeida Flavio Vaz, Kako Iara Sakitani, Laranjeiro de Andrade Patrícia Faias and Hino Celso Mitsuo

This chapter describes and discusses the main results of the successful off-hour delivery (OHD) pilot test in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, which took place between…

Abstract

This chapter describes and discusses the main results of the successful off-hour delivery (OHD) pilot test in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, which took place between October 2014 and March 2015. The pilot engaged major stakeholders in urban distribution, including local authorities, shippers, carriers, and receivers, with the aim to determine what are the main requirements, constraints, opportunities, and threats for establishing a public policy related to shifting deliveries to late night in order to mitigate traffic congestion.

Differently from the former City of New York OHD pilot, here all participant companies were volunteers, with no need for cash incentives. The primary focus in São Paulo was on the issues of safety and noise, besides productivity aspects of travel time, truck speed, and delivery time.

The pilot was very successful, with no registered complaints of noise or security incidents. Travel speeds were obtained from global positioning system (GPS) tracking data and internal delivery systems. The chapter compares daytime and night operations and shows that productivity in some chains would improve significantly, but noise and safety must be carefully controlled to guarantee the expansion of the concept.

Details

Supply Chain Management and Logistics in Latin America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-804-4

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Per Erik Eriksson

Improving construction supply chain collaboration and performance is central for achieving short‐term business objectives as well as long‐term competitive advantage. Lean…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving construction supply chain collaboration and performance is central for achieving short‐term business objectives as well as long‐term competitive advantage. Lean thinking is an approach that has been adopted in many different industrial settings as a means for improving supply chain performance. In the project‐based construction industry, lean thinking has, however, not yet been widely adopted. The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of how various aspects of lean thinking can be implemented in a construction project and how they affect supply chain actors and their performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Action research was performed in a case study of a lean construction pilot project. Empirical data were collected through three surveys and follow‐up workshops, document studies, and interviews of 12 project participants.

Findings

The findings show that many of the lean‐related aspects identified in the literature review were utilized in the pilot project. These aspects have mostly focused on increasing the cooperation among supply chain actors, for which reason the pilot project is very similar to a partnering project. Hence, much work remains in order to obtain full‐fledged lean construction, but the pilot project may serve as a starting point for continuous improvements and development of lean construction in future projects.

Research limitations/implications

The research results are based on one empirical case study for which reasonable generalisations could be made, albeit cautiously.

Practical implications

The frame of reference can serve as an illustration of important aspects and core elements of lean construction and the case study findings show how various lean related aspects can be implemented and how they affect supply chain actors and their performance in a construction project context.

Originality/value

The action research approach based on both qualitative and quantitative data collection in a lean construction pilot project provides a valuable opportunity to study both the process of implementing lean construction and its outcomes.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Jean Plaister

The European Commission has accepted a proposal for an Open Systems Inter‐Connection (OSI) pilot/demonstration project between library networks in Europe for interlending…

Abstract

The European Commission has accepted a proposal for an Open Systems Inter‐Connection (OSI) pilot/demonstration project between library networks in Europe for interlending services. The project arose from the Commission's call for ‘declaration of interest’ in pilot or demonstration projects designed to promote competitiveness and develop the information service market in Europe. It predates the ‘Plan of Action for Libraries in the European Community’, but subscribes to the objectives and action lines included in it.

Details

VINE, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Ingrid Verwey

This paper reviews how women help women in the South African Women in Construction (SAWIC) organization to effectively participate in projects. In a pilot project

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reviews how women help women in the South African Women in Construction (SAWIC) organization to effectively participate in projects. In a pilot project partnering with industry stakeholders, the Development Bank of Southern Africa as incubator of SAWIC, further explored what support women contractors required to succeed, tested mentoring and coaching as part of enterprise development.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant literature were studied and analysed, testing the views and measure of success of women contractors against existing models. A survey instrument was developed to test the constructs empirically.

Findings

The empirical testing of success as a construct indicated that women overwhelmingly view mentoring and coaching as key capacity building and growth strategies towards successful women‐owned construction enterprises, underpinned by preliminary indications of the almost complete pilot study.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation to the study is that it is based on preliminary findings and limited scope of the civil project.

Practical implications

Given the excellent results of the Cronbach α and factor analysis, the instrument developed proved to be reliable and valid and could be used for similar studies.

Originality/value

Knowledge sharing of lessons learnt in the joint initiative between government, the building industry, development finance institutions and women associations towards addressing critical skills shortages and gender equity.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Elise Barrella, Kelsey Lineburg and Peter Hurley

The purpose of this paper is to describe a pilot application of the Sustainable Transportation Analysis & Rating System (STARS), and highlight how a sustainability rating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a pilot application of the Sustainable Transportation Analysis & Rating System (STARS), and highlight how a sustainability rating system can be used to promote sustainable urban development through a university–city partnership. STARS is an example of a second-generation “green” rating system focused on transportation planning, design, operations and maintenance.

Design/methodology/approach

In Fall 2013, James Madison University (JMU) initiated a STARS pilot demonstration using a local corridor that connects the university and the city of Harrisonburg. The pilot’s purposes were to develop attainable transportation-development targets, evaluate infrastructure and programmatic options in the context of a credit-based system and demonstrate a decision-making framework centered on sustainability optimization. The paper provides an overview of the STARS framework and the pilot’s collaborations, analysis, findings and recommendations for credits across sustainability dimensions.

Findings

Upon applying the rating system, the research team found that STARS may initially be easier to integrate into a comprehensive transportation planning process than a corridor-level evaluation due to data needs, in-house expertise and planning timelines for campus and city developments. A campus-wide master plan based on STARS would enable a university and a city to apply sustainability principles to their physical and/or policy interfaces to systemically create change and achieve quantifiable targets.

Originality/value

The STARS framework provides a novel approach for integrating multiple stakeholders (faculty, the university and city staff, students and community members) in a process of capacity building, evaluating options, policy-making, implementation and performance monitoring. The JMU pilot is the first application of STARS at a university and the only US East Coast application to date.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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