Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Majid Mazhar, Majid Abdouss, Farhad Zarifi and Mojdeh Zargaran

The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of eight perylene diimide pigments as a hypothetical building facades using EnergyPlus.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of eight perylene diimide pigments as a hypothetical building facades using EnergyPlus.

Design/methodology/approach

A hypothetical building located in Tehran is modeled using EnergyPlus, and the effectiveness of the pigments was examined. Furthermore, the performance of the pigments was compared with those of common commercial black (carbon black) and red (iron oxide) pigments.

Findings

The results show that the studied black pigments reduce the cooling energy demand up to 37 per cent in comparison with carbon black paint and the red ones, which reduce the value by as much as 32 per cent in comparison to iron oxide.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that the application of cool paints rather than common paints will significantly reduce the cooling energy demand and subsequent costs.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

R. Aghababzadeh, A.R. Mirhabibi, H. Bastami, E.T. Taheri‐Nassaj and L. Lin

To investigate the effects of the temperature of synthesis and of the thermal treatment of zinc chromate on the properties of the zinc chromate pigments.

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the effects of the temperature of synthesis and of the thermal treatment of zinc chromate on the properties of the zinc chromate pigments.

Design/methodology/approach

Zinc chromate pigments was prepared using zinc salt solution, sodium hydroxide and potassium dichromate solutions. The reaction temperature was varied in order to evaluate the effect of the reaction temperature on the properties of the pigment synthesised. The pigment obtained was heated to 10°C above the critical temperature in order to investigate the effect of thermal treatment on the pigment properties. SEM, XRD, XFR and STA were employed for the characterisation of the pigments synthesised.

Findings

Reaction temperature had a significant effect on the properties of the resulting pigment. Thermal treatment of the pigment caused the decomposition of the zinc chromate phase to ZnO, ZnCr2O4 and K2CrO4 phases. The glaze containing zinc chromate had satisfactory colour characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on the preparation and evaluation of zinc chromate as a substitute for praseodymium zircon in glaze. The study could be extended to investigation of similar inorganic pigment for similar purposes.

Practical implications

The information on the effects of the reaction temperature of pigment synthesis and of thermal treatment of the pigment is useful for industrial production of the pigment of satisfactory properties.

Originality/value

Novel use of zinc chromate as a lower‐cost substitute for praseodymium zircon in glaze and understanding of the effects of the production conditions on the properties of the resulting pigment and the glaze.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

L Armanini

The effects which are produced by pearlescent pigments are intimately connected to optics and the interaction of light with matter. Pearlescent pigments are optical…

Abstract

The effects which are produced by pearlescent pigments are intimately connected to optics and the interaction of light with matter. Pearlescent pigments are optical filters which reflect and transmit light which falls upon them. In order to understand pearlescent pigments, therefore it is first necessary to understand some of the basic laws of optics. I would like to review some of these laws to talk about light and its interaction with matter, how it can be separated into its components, the laws of reflection and refraction and how all of these laws apply to pearlescent pigments.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 17 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

C.A. Smith

In part one the various properties of this important metallic pigment are considered.

Abstract

In part one the various properties of this important metallic pigment are considered.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 8 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

M.A. Abou‐Khalil, S.M. El‐Saawy and N.A. Ghanem

Different methods have been carried out to prepare barium metaborate pigments and to find out the suitable method of preparation taking into account ease of industrial…

Abstract

Different methods have been carried out to prepare barium metaborate pigments and to find out the suitable method of preparation taking into account ease of industrial application and the yield of the product. The properties of the prepared pigments were tested and compared with those of the commercial pigment. The solubility of the prepared pigment was found to be high and needed to be decreased. Many different methods of treatment were used and six grades of barium metaborate pigment were obtained. It was found that the addition of silicate to the prepared pigments has decreased their solubilities.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Nivin M. Ahmed, Hassan S. Emira and Mohamed M. Selim

Organic coatings remain the most widely used way of protecting steel structures from corrosion. Traditional anticorrosive paints contain lead or hexavalent chromium…

Abstract

Purpose

Organic coatings remain the most widely used way of protecting steel structures from corrosion. Traditional anticorrosive paints contain lead or hexavalent chromium compounds as active pigments. The use of these classical chromates is nowadays restricted by increasing environmental awareness and stringent national and international regulations. An alternative is the use of ion‐exchangeable pigments. The purpose of this paper is to show that cation‐exchanged zeolites can be considered as a safe and efficient alternative to traditional hazardous pigments in protecting steel surfaces.

Design/methodology/approach

The new pigments were characterised using different analytical and spectro‐photometric techniques. Characterisation of these pigments using X‐ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were done. X‐ray fluorescence was employed to elucidate the concentration of different elements in the prepared pigments. Evaluation of the ion‐exchanged and initial zeolite pigments using international standard testing methods (ASTM) was estimated. Testing the anticorrosive protection of cation‐exchanged zeolites in alkyd paints formulated based on their pigment volume concentration/critical pigment volume concentration was studied, and then these new pigments were applied on cold‐rolled steel panels. The physico‐mechanical properties of dry films and their corrosion properties using accelerated laboratory test in 3.5 per cent NaCl for 28 days were tested.

Findings

The results of this work revealed that paint films containing initial Na‐zeolite performed the least protection behaviour, while films including Zn, Ca and Mg‐zeolites were better in their corrosion protection performance, and they can be arranged as Zn‐zeolite>Ca‐zeolite>Mg‐zeolite.

Practical implications

These pigments can be applied in other polymer composites, e.g. rubber and plastics as reinforcing agent and fillers.

Originality/value

The paper shows that these prepared pigments are environmentally friendly pigments which impart high anticorrosive behaviour to paint films with great economic savings.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

G. Blustein, B. del Amo and R. Romagnoli

The objective of this work was to study the anticorrosive behaviour of three commercial pigments containing micronized zinc phosphate. The chemical analyses of the pigments

Abstract

The objective of this work was to study the anticorrosive behaviour of three commercial pigments containing micronized zinc phosphate. The chemical analyses of the pigments were carried out in the laboratory to characterise them with respect to their composition and soluble matter. It was proposed to check pigments’ efficiency in solvent‐borne paints with 30 per cent v/v of the pigment by volume and a pigment volume concentration/critical pigment volume concentration ratio (PVC/CPVC) equal to 0.8. The behaviour of paints formulated with two binders (alkyd and epoxy) was assessed by accelerated (salt spray cabinet, humidity chamber and accelerated weathering) and electrochemical (corrosion potential, ionic resistance and polarisation resistance) tests. It was demonstrated that pigment performance is highly influenced by their solubility which, in turn, could influence the formation of the protective layer on the metal substrate. Good correlation was obtained between salt spray and electrochemical tests.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Nivin M. Ahmed and Mohamed M. Selim

The purpose of this paper is to determine a new easy route to obtain high performance and economic anticorrosive hybrid pigments based on kaolin and ferrite. The new route…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine a new easy route to obtain high performance and economic anticorrosive hybrid pigments based on kaolin and ferrite. The new route is based on depositing a surface layer of an expensive efficient anticorrosive pigment (ferrite) on a bulk of cheap extender pigment (kaolin). The combination of these pigments can add improved properties to the new pigment different from each of its individual components. These improved properties lead to imparting new properties to paint films containing these prepared pigments.

Design/methodology/approach

The new prepared hybrid pigments contain different concentrations of deposited ferrite on kaolin surface, are determined using X‐ray fluorescence analysis to estimate the concentration of each element in the pigments. The pigments are characterised using different spectro‐photometric and analytical methods to prove the deposition of the shell layer and elucidate the structure of their particles. Then, they are incorporated in anticorrosive paint formulations, where their presence in these formulations is between 50 and 75 per cent of the total pigments in the paint formula. A model of the mechanism of protection to the metal substrate is presented.

Findings

The results show that the presence of these hybrid pigments imparts excellent corrosion protection to steel substrates, in spite of their different concentrations and loadings in the paint films.

Practical implications

These pigments can be applied in other polymer composites, e.g. rubber and plastics as filler and reinforcing agent.

Originality/value

Prepared pigments are eco‐friendly and can replace other hazardous pigments (e.g. chromates) – also it can replace original ferrite pigments. These pigments can compensate for the presence of other known pigments in markets successfully. The main advantage of these pigments is that they combine both the properties of their counter‐parts, and they are of lower cost than the original inhibitive pigment (ferrite). Also, they can be applied in other industries other than paints, e.g. paper, rubber and plastics composites.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Y.M. Abu Ayana, S.M. El‐Sawy and S.H. Salah

Zinc‐ferrite pigment was prepared by solid‐state reaction. A mixture of α‐Fe2O3 and ZnO in a molar ratio of 1:1 was fired at 1,200°C. X‐ray diffraction measurements proved…

Abstract

Zinc‐ferrite pigment was prepared by solid‐state reaction. A mixture of α‐Fe2O3 and ZnO in a molar ratio of 1:1 was fired at 1,200°C. X‐ray diffraction measurements proved that the reacted material crystallized into a spinal structure. Measurement of the pigment specification and properties were carried out according to standard international methods. The pigment extract and the extract of the pigment‐linseed oil mixture were examined for use in protecting steel panels against rust. The prepared pigment was incorporated in some paint formulations. Physical, chemical and mechanical properties of the formulated paint films were studied and also tested for corrosion resistance. Finds that zinc ferrite is a basic pigment and can be recommended for use in anti‐corrosive paints. High corrosion‐resistant coatings can be obtained by incorporating zinc‐ferrite pigment in organic coating systems that cannot saponify; protection increases as the pigment‐binder ratio increases. Chemically follows up and physically emphasizes the mechanism of corrosion protection by the use of a Mossbauer spectroscope.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

P. Kresse

Because of rationalisation and demands for improved quality, the surface coatings industry makes ever‐increasing demands for micronised pigments. Micronised pigments

Abstract

Because of rationalisation and demands for improved quality, the surface coatings industry makes ever‐increasing demands for micronised pigments. Micronised pigments permit quicker dispersion and increased output, coincident with decreased production costs. Such factors as the superior dispersibility of micronised pigments have frequently been mentioned, and it is not easy to quote new aspects of this. Therefore, this article will primarily cover other technical advantages of micronised iron oxide pigments‐advantages hitherto neglected in favour of the main advantage, better dispersibility.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 2 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

1 – 10 of over 6000