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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2009

Catherine Pope

This article summarises the recently published mental health physiotherapy strategy, Recovering Mind and Body: A framework for physiotherapy in mental health and wellbeing…

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Abstract

This article summarises the recently published mental health physiotherapy strategy, Recovering Mind and Body: A framework for physiotherapy in mental health and wellbeing (Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, 2008a) and its companion document Commissioning Mental Health Services: The contribution of physiotherapy to integrated services for health and wellbeing (Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, 2008b), and discusses how the documents can be used to ensure that more mental health service users and carers can benefit from the skills of physiotherapists.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2022

Cristina Bravo, Liv Helvik Skjaerven, Luisa Guitard, Francesc Rubí-Carnacea and Daniel Catalan-Matamoros

The aim of this study was directed toward how a group of fourth year bachelor physiotherapy students describes their experiences, attitudes and beliefs from participating…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was directed toward how a group of fourth year bachelor physiotherapy students describes their experiences, attitudes and beliefs from participating in a course of 40 h lasting three months in basic body awareness therapy (BBAT).

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study using phenomenological exploratory design was conducted. A total of 125 physiotherapy students within the subject of mental health physiotherapy, in the fourth year’s study course belonging participated. The BBAT introduction course consisted of 20 h theory and 20 h practical implementation with a particular focus on promoting movement quality through a movement awareness learning strategy. The course was carried out through three consecutive years. Data were collected through using focus group interview at the end of each movement session and qualitative face-to-face research interview at the end of the whole course.

Findings

The data-analysis revealed 16 emerging themes grouped into four categories: physical perceptions, body awareness characteristics, self-awareness and body awareness professional development.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights key experiences after attending a course on BBAT. In addition, it points out that to achieve movement quality awareness among the students, there is a need to include more self-training in the curriculum.

Practical implications

The movement quality learning process is necessary to develop the mental health physiotherapy program. The experiences of students while body awareness learning process included physical perceptions, body awareness characteristics, self-awareness and professional development.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to describe the experiences of students when a movement awareness learning methodology is applied. In physiotherapy in mental health, this learning process is relevant for the application of BBAT.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Waheed Akbar Bhatti, Mario Glowik and Ahmad Arslan

This study aims to investigate the role of consumers’ (patients) motives in knowledge sharing and value co-creation with the service provider in the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the role of consumers’ (patients) motives in knowledge sharing and value co-creation with the service provider in the context of physiotherapy services.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used partial least squares structural equation modeling for the analysis of the physiotherapy services users’ data from Germany and Pakistan.

Findings

The results show that in both consumer groups, individualizing, empowering and development motives are common influences on the willingness to share knowledge leading to value co-creation. However, the relating, ethical and concerted motives show varying influences in the data set.

Research limitations/implications

A key research implication relates to specifying the link between consumer knowledge sharing and value creation and the role of cultural factors in this context. It is one of the first studies to undertake a comparative analysis in this specific context by highlighting the changing role of consumers from collective and individualistic societies, in influencing service provision through participation in the service exchange.

Practical implications

For the managerial audience, this paper highlights the importance of being sensitive to cultural elements as they tend to influence personal knowledge sharing by the consumer, especially in the well-being sector, which ultimately influences the value co-creation.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the current paper is one of the first studies focusing on the knowledge sharing motives of consumers in the specific context of physiotherapy services leading to value co-creation. Moreover, specific focus on individual consumer’s motives and their role in comparative, cross-cultural settings, adds further value to the contribution of this study.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Neha Sawant, Meruna Bose and Shrutika Parab

Hand impairment post-stroke is a very common and important rehabilitation goal for functional independence. Advanced therapy options such as an app. therapy provides…

Abstract

Purpose

Hand impairment post-stroke is a very common and important rehabilitation goal for functional independence. Advanced therapy options such as an app. therapy provides repetitive training, which may be beneficial for improving fine motor function. This study aims to evaluate the effect of app-based therapy compared to conventional hand therapy in improving dexterity in individuals with stroke.

Methodology

In total, 39 individuals within the first year of stroke with Brunnstrom stage of hand recovery IV to VI were randomly divided into three groups. All three groups received 60 min of therapy for 21 sessions over a period of 30 days. Group A received conventional hand therapy; Group B received app. therapy, while Group C received conventional therapy along with the app. therapy. All participants were assessed on the Nine-Hole Peg Test and Jebsen–Taylor Hand Function Test at the beginning and after completion of 21 sessions of intervention. Kruskal–Wallis (H) test and Wilcoxon test were used for statistical analysis.

Results

All three groups improved on hand function post-treatment. However, Group C demonstrated significant improvement with 16%–58% increase in hand function performance on outcome measures (p < 0.05).

Findings

Findings of the present study demonstrate improvement in dexterity with the app. therapy and combination therapy, in comparison to conventional therapy alone in individuals with stroke.

Originality

This experimental study focuses the first time on a structured protocol using an enabling technology adjunct to conventional physical therapy to improve hand function in individuals with stroke, which opens up the further scope in Neurorehabilitation.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/ILT-04-2020-0144/

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 January 2021

Daha Garba Muhammad and Jamila Suleiman Musa

This study aimed to explain the impact of the corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on physiotherapy services in Nigeria.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to explain the impact of the corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on physiotherapy services in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a commentary piece.

Findings

The pandemic has potential of reducing efficacy of physiotherapy services. It also showed that the mental health of local physiotherapists was badly affected. On the other hand, the pandemic allowed physiotherapists to support infectious disease prevention and control and as well as providing awareness of the role of physiotherapy in the management of respiratory diseases.

Originality/value

It shows the effect of COVID-19 on physiotherapy care.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Tom Sanders, Bie Nio Ong, Gail Sowden and Nadine Foster

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from qualitative interviews with physiotherapists to demonstrate why even minor changes to clinical work resulting from the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from qualitative interviews with physiotherapists to demonstrate why even minor changes to clinical work resulting from the introduction of new interventions, are often difficult to implement. The paper seeks to illustrate how some of the obstacles to implementing change were managed by physiotherapists.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 32 qualitative interviews with participating physiotherapists were conducted, 12 interviews prior to the introduction of the new system, and 20 afterwards. The interviews were coded and analysed thematically.

Findings

The findings reveal a number of perceived limitations of current management of low back pain and identify key themes around convergence with the new approach, such as willingness by physiotherapists to adopt the new approach, the perception of benefits to adopting the new approach, as well as some difficulty in adjusting to it. The authors refer to the positive and negative elements as “soft” and “hard” disruption. The adoption of the new approach is explored with reference to the “situated” dimensions of physiotherapy practice and normalisation process theory.

Research limitations/implications

The study raises the need to conduct future observational research to support the interview findings.

Originality/value

The study describes the “situated” components of physiotherapy work, which have received limited research attention. The value of the study lies less in its ability to explain specifically why physiotherapists adopted or rejected the new system, but in describing the conditions and consequences of change that might be translated to other professions, contexts and interventions.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Pam Enderby, Alexandra John, Anthony Hughes and Brian Petheram

This report presents outcome data from 3,176 consecutive prospective patients referred to physiotherapy for the treatment of soft tissue injuries. The results detailed…

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Abstract

This report presents outcome data from 3,176 consecutive prospective patients referred to physiotherapy for the treatment of soft tissue injuries. The results detailed here are part of a larger study collecting data from different NHS trusts in a benchmarking study. The Therapy Outcome Measure was used to collect data on each patient in four domains: Impairment, Disability/activity, Handicap/participation, and Distress/wellbeing on the entry and the exit from physiotherapy. The study concludes that patients do not have equal opportunity of accessing therapy for their specific condition according to their abilities and needs. Therapy provided in the Trusts did not produce similar changes in the patients’ abilities and some dimensions appeared to improve more significantly in some locations. Furthermore this study would suggest that there are no common criteria for discharge of patients with similar conditions from physiotherapy across the Trusts as measured by the Therapy Outcome Measure.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 September 2021

Thérèse Eriksson, Lars-Åke Levin and Ann-Charlotte Nedlund

Using financial incentives has been criticised for putting too much focus on things that can be measured. Value-based reimbursement may better align professional values…

Abstract

Purpose

Using financial incentives has been criticised for putting too much focus on things that can be measured. Value-based reimbursement may better align professional values with financial incentives. However, professional values may differ between actor groups. In this article, the authors identify institutional logics within healthcare-providing organisations. Further, the authors analyse how the centrality and compatibility of the identified logics affect the institutionalisation of external demands.

Design/methodology/approach

41 semi-structured interviews were conducted with representatives from healthcare providers within spine surgery in Sweden, where a value-based reimbursement programme was introduced. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis with an abductive approach, and a conceptual framework based on neo-institutional theory.

Findings

After the introduction of the value-based reimbursement programme, the centrality and compatibility of the institutional logics within healthcare-providing organisations changed. The logic of spine surgeons was dominating whereas physiotherapists struggled to motivate a higher cost for high quality physiotherapy. The institutional logic of nurses was aligned with spine surgeons, however as a peripheral logic facilitating spine surgery. To attain holistic and interdisciplinary healthcare, dominating institutional logics within healthcare-providing organisations need to allow peripheral institutional logics to attain a higher centrality for higher compatibility. Thus, allowing other occupations to take responsibility for quality and attain the feeling of professional pride.

Originality/value

Interviewing spine surgeons, physiotherapists, nurses, managers and administrators allows us to deepen the understanding of micro-level behaviour as a reaction (or lack thereof) to macro-level decisions.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Maggie Ashcroft

Presents and discusses the findings of a study of the impact of the use of library services and information by physiotherapists on their decision making for patient care…

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Abstract

Presents and discusses the findings of a study of the impact of the use of library services and information by physiotherapists on their decision making for patient care. A postal questionnaire was distributed to the staff of each physiotherapy department in 37 National Health Service Trust hospitals in the Northern and Yorkshire region. The methodology for the study was that used in previous studies undertaken in the USA. The “critical incident” technique was used in order to pinpoint a particular situation when a need for information, connected with patient care, had caused the respondent to seek help. The respondent was asked to pose the enquiry at their hospital library and information service point and complete a questionnaire to record the success and speed of their enquiry, and to evaluate the impact of the information on their decisions relating to patient care.

Details

Library Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

E. Kelly, J. Campbell and P. Murray

The purpose of this paper is to assess patient satisfaction with their healthcare experience, total hip replacement outcome, compliance with post operative rehabilitation…

1204

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess patient satisfaction with their healthcare experience, total hip replacement outcome, compliance with post operative rehabilitation and consenting process effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A consecutive sample of patients between January 2007 and September 2008 was identified. A novel questionnaire was designed to assess outcomes and applied via phone interview by an independent assessor.

Findings

All patients recalled the consenting/education process with a high proportion recalling surgical risks/benefits. Overall satisfaction was good or better in 76 per cent of the cohort. Post‐operative compliance with the rehabilitation programme in 70 per cent of the cohort was achieved. Walking, as the surrogate functional marker, was deemed good or better in 76 per cent.

Practical implications

The education process and a purposefully designed booklet helped educate patients. Those dissatisfied with physiotherapy generally underwent surgery late in the week and were assessed/treated by the emergency physiotherapy service. Consequently, full‐time weekend physiotherapy for arthroplasty patients was implemented.

Originality/value

Results revealed a high‐volume treatment centre with outcomes comparable to international standards. A potential problem with physiotherapy cover was identified and the loop closed.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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