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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Hayley Weddle, Marie Lockton and Amanda Datnow

While the benefits of teacher collaboration are well documented, less is known about how emotions intersect with teachers’ collective work. Educational change is an…

Abstract

Purpose

While the benefits of teacher collaboration are well documented, less is known about how emotions intersect with teachers’ collective work. Educational change is an emotional process, as reform efforts often involve shifts in teachers’ daily routines and professional identities. To better understand these complexities, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the emotional dimensions of teachers’ collaborative efforts to improve instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on qualitative data, this longitudinal case study of one teacher team explores how teacher collaboration for instructional improvement intersects with emotional geographies. Data analyzed include three years of meeting observations and annual interviews with teachers and school leaders.

Findings

An analysis of data reveals how emotions both shaped and were shaped by teachers’ collaboration experiences. Varying beliefs about practice, expectations about collective work and identity (in this case, gender) impacted collaboration and subsequently opportunities for instructional improvement.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates how attending to the emotional aspects of teacher collaboration could serve as an effective strategy for bolstering capacity-building efforts. Findings highlight the interplay between emotional geographies, suggesting that common ground across one geography could potentially be built upon to close gaps across others.

Originality/value

This study provides a unique longitudinal exploration of the emotional dimensions of teachers’ collective work. The study also contributes to new knowledge about the ways in which teachers’ emotions and collaborative experiences intersect, including the interplay between emotional geographies.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2013

C. Michael Hall

Depending on the research approach one uses, the development of particular bodies of knowledge over time is the result of a combination of agency, chance, opportunity…

Abstract

Depending on the research approach one uses, the development of particular bodies of knowledge over time is the result of a combination of agency, chance, opportunity, patronage, power, or structure. This particular account of the development of geographies of tourism stresses its place as understood within the context of different approaches, different research behaviors and foci, and its location within the wider research community and society. The chapter charts the development of different epistemological, methodological, and theoretical traditions over time, their rise and fall, and, in some cases, rediscovery. The chapter concludes that the marketization of academic production will have an increasingly important influence on the nature and direction of tourism geographies.

Details

Geographies of Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-212-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Norman Jackson, Geoff Parks, Margaret Harrison and Chantal Stebbings

The article introduces the concept of benchmarking as a referencing process to support self‐regulation of quality and outcome standards in higher education programmes. It…

Abstract

The article introduces the concept of benchmarking as a referencing process to support self‐regulation of quality and outcome standards in higher education programmes. It examines the potential for exploiting the product of programme specification to explain which institutional and external reference points or benchmarks have been used to inform the design of programmes. It provides practitioner commentary on the process of benchmarking based on the worked examples provided in the Quality Assurance Agency guidelines for preparing programme specifications and offers an emergent practice model. It concludes by identifying key development issues that will need to be addressed.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Victoria Lynn Packard

Abstract

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Reference Reviews, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Bradon Ellem

Despite being increasingly touted as the kind of fundamental transformation needed for union survival, “community unionism” is typically ill‐defined and poorly explained…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite being increasingly touted as the kind of fundamental transformation needed for union survival, “community unionism” is typically ill‐defined and poorly explained. This paper seeks to provide greater precision of terminology and context through a series of geographically‐informed historical studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Through explaining and synthesising the work of a number of scholars from different disciplines, the paper develops a framework for a “geo‐historical” analysis. It begins not with community unionism as such but with a more open exploration of the relationship between unions and social formations at, for the most part, the local scale. Empirical material, based on original qualitative studies, is presented for one industry, Australian mining, across different places and time periods but concentrating most upon the iron ore regions in Western Australia where recent struggles over union renewal and form have been particularly intense.

Findings

This paper argues two things about community unionism: that this union form is not without historical antecedents and, more importantly, that its structure, nature and prospects can be better understood if analysed through a number of concepts which geographers have recently developed to explore the intersections between work, community and employment relations. More needs to be done to explain not only the nature and emergence of community unionism but also the very real problems it faces in sustaining itself, let alone transforming union movements overall. The findings point to the varied forms which so‐called community unionism may take as well as to the challenges to its current forms, including from within the labour movement itself.

Originality/value

The value of the paper lies in its theoretical innovation, drawing on a range of disciplines, and its attempt to situate community unionism precisely – conceptually, historically and geographically.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1958

B.C. VICKERY

In preceding papers in this series, it has been shown that the symbols used in classificatory notation are of several kinds. They serve different functions—some represent…

Abstract

In preceding papers in this series, it has been shown that the symbols used in classificatory notation are of several kinds. They serve different functions—some represent scheduled classificatory terms, some are ‘signposts’ specifying the nature of the symbols which follow them, others are simply ‘fences’ separating consecutive term symbols, and yet others are relational particles. Again, symbols serving the same function may have different structures—they may be flexions or isolates, so that the notation for scheduled terms may be ‘hierarchical’ or ‘ordinal’.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Margaret Harrison

This article takes as its starting point the notion that information has to be customised for different user groups and shows how different types of programme…

Abstract

This article takes as its starting point the notion that information has to be customised for different user groups and shows how different types of programme specification might be created for different audiences. It describes three types of programme specification: a template version written for an academic audience; free format version written for a student audience; and a summary statement written for an employer audience. It also examines the potential for linking programme specification details to online course admission profiles. It concludes that programme specification has the potential to be a valuable aid to communication between academics, students and employers.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

K.C. Fraser

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Reference Reviews, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Shahid Siddiqi

This paper examines the issue of core competency from the perspective of economic regionalization. It utilizes the concept of strategic geography and the studies focusing…

Abstract

This paper examines the issue of core competency from the perspective of economic regionalization. It utilizes the concept of strategic geography and the studies focusing on regional integration in order to interlink with the concept of corporate regiocentric orientation. It is within this framework that the concept of core competency is discussed. Of particular concern is the question as to how the regional element creates opportunities and imposes challenges on the ability to extend, renew and customize core competencies.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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