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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1992

Phyllis Hope and J. Fred Rayworth

Reports on the Canadian public service sector, which has led theway in providing employer‐sponsored on‐site child care for employees.Suggests that such child care may be…

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Abstract

Reports on the Canadian public service sector, which has led the way in providing employer‐sponsored on‐site child care for employees. Suggests that such child care may be one way to recruit and retain staff, reduce staff turnover and absenteeism and increase staff morale in hospitals particularly, where irregular hours make the problem of child care especially acute.

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Health Manpower Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Quebec was the first Canadian jurisdiction to legislate on pay equality. It did so through the adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedom, in 1976, a passive…

Abstract

Quebec was the first Canadian jurisdiction to legislate on pay equality. It did so through the adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedom, in 1976, a passive legislation since it is based on complaints. It seems to be a matter of time before the Quebec Government passes a pro‐active legislation on pay equity and, in doing so, it will likely draw its inspiration from the Pay Equity Act (PEA) passed by the Ontario Government in 1987. One of PEAs important features is the emphasis on institutional structures and practices in determining the appropriate unit for the purpose of achieving pay equity. In practice, such units will often match up with the usual job families (e.g. clerical or office vs production jobs). However, the historical development of jobs families is intertwined with the evolution of occupational segregation between men and women in the labour markets.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Nancy Nelson Hodges and Holly M. Lentz

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of displaced female textile sector workers.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of displaced female textile sector workers.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach to data collection and interpretation forms the methodological basis of the study. In‐depth interviews were conducted with 14 female employees who were laid off from a large textile manufacturing facility in a southeastern state. Participants were selected through the local community college where they returned to school after losing their jobs.

Findings

A phenomenological interpretation of the responses led to the development of three emergent thematic areas connecting similarities and differences that surfaced across the participants' narratives. Key issues within the thematic areas point to the need for each participant to come to terms with the job loss, both emotionally and financially, and to decide where she would go from there.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on women employed at a single manufacturing facility and within a single state in the southeastern USA. Implications of the meanings of participants' experiences for their community and for the future of employment in the US textile sector are considered.

Practical implications

The study provides an interpretation of the impact of textile sector dynamics on the lives of displaced workers and the local community.

Originality/value

The paper offers insight into the human side of industry dynamics and declining manufacturing employment figures. It also sheds light on the extent to which some displaced textile sector workers have pursued the educational options made available through government programs designed to provide assistance with education and retraining.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1926

THIS number will appear at the beginning of the Leeds Conference. Although there is no evidence that the attendance will surpass the record attendance registered at the…

Abstract

THIS number will appear at the beginning of the Leeds Conference. Although there is no evidence that the attendance will surpass the record attendance registered at the Birmingham Conference, there is every reason to believe that the attendance at Leeds will be very large. The year is one of importance in the history of the city, for it has marked the 300th anniversary of its charter. We hope that some of the festival spirit will survive into the week of the Conference. As a contributor has suggested on another page, we hope that all librarians who attend will do so with the determination to make the Conference one of the friendliest possible character. It has occasionally been pointed out that as the Association grows older it is liable to become more stilted and formal; that institutions and people become standardized and less dynamic. This, if it were true, would be a great pity.

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New Library World, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1925

We issue a double Souvenir number of The Library World in connection with the Library Association Conference at Birmingham, in which we have pleasure in including a…

Abstract

We issue a double Souvenir number of The Library World in connection with the Library Association Conference at Birmingham, in which we have pleasure in including a special article, “Libraries in Birmingham,” by Mr. Walter Powell, Chief Librarian of Birmingham Public Libraries. He has endeavoured to combine in it the subject of Special Library collections, and libraries other than the Municipal Libraries in the City. Another article entitled “Some Memories of Birmingham” is by Mr. Richard W. Mould, Chief Librarian and Curator of Southwark Public Libraries and Cuming Museum. We understand that a very full programme has been arranged for the Conference, and we have already published such details as are now available in our July number.

Details

New Library World, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Lindsay Jones and Phyllis Annesley

An innovative training approach was developed to enable staff working with complex cases, including personality disorder, to reflect on and work with the interpersonal…

Abstract

Purpose

An innovative training approach was developed to enable staff working with complex cases, including personality disorder, to reflect on and work with the interpersonal dynamics of their interactions with service users. The aim of this approach is to support effective, compassionate and boundaried care. An overview of the model and development of the training is provided along with presentation and discussion of outcome data. Implications for future practice are also considered.

Design/methodology/approach

One-day workshops were provided within inpatient forensic women’s services. Nine workshops were delivered with 96 multidisciplinary staff having attended in total. Evaluation tools were developed to ascertain participants’ feedback regarding the training including its relevance and potential for impact on practice. Feedback was analysed using a mixture of quantitative and qualitative methods.

Findings

The evaluation demonstrated that the training was well received by a motivated group of participants and was felt to be relevant to their clinical practice.

Research limitations/implications

The evaluation is limited by the lack of a follow-up to assess the longer-term impacts of the training and whether the positive effects of the training were maintained.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate that the training can be delivered within a short time frame, which makes the training efficient and cost effective.

Social implications

The training can develop practitioners’ skills in delivering compassionate and boundaried care in line with key NHS drivers for staff working with complex service users.

Originality/value

The 4Ps model enables staff with little or no psychotherapy training to deliver psychologically informed care which takes account of interpersonal dynamics and positively contributes to relational security, with an emphasis on reflecting on self and others.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Robert J. Cramer and Phyllis Gerstenfeld

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Phyllis Annesley, Adedayo Alabi and Laura Longdon

The purpose of this paper is to describe the Eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) treatment of an adult female patient detained within a high secure…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the Eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) treatment of an adult female patient detained within a high secure hospital with complex mental health difficulties, including complex trauma, factitious disorder, self-injury and a history of offending. The EMDR treatment addressed the patient’s urges to engage in severe and sometimes life-threatening self-injury, a primary motive of which was to access physical healthcare interventions within a general hospital. The paper describes the wide-ranging benefits of the treatment and incorporates feedback from the patient and clinicians within her multi-disciplinary team (MDT).

Design/methodology/approach

Four triggers for self-injury were processed during the therapy using the DeTUR Protocol (Popky, 2005, 2009) and the Constant Installation of Present Orientation and Safety (CIPOS, Knipe, 2009a) method. In total, 18 one hour therapy sessions were delivered plus three follow-up sessions to continue to offer support and complete the post-treatment evaluation.

Findings

The level of urge for each trigger was reduced to 0 which the patient defined as “no urge to self-injure”. Benefits went well beyond self-injury with reported positive impacts on mood, thinking, sleep, concentration, memory and experience of flashbacks.

Practical implications

This case report demonstrates that the EMDR DeTUR Protocol together with the CIPOS method can be extremely valuable in the treatment of patients who self-injure.

Originality/value

The case report offers an important contribution to an area that requires much further research.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1940

THIS issue opens the new volume of THE LIBRARY WORLD and it is natural that we should pause to glance at the long road we have travelled. For over forty years our pages…

Abstract

THIS issue opens the new volume of THE LIBRARY WORLD and it is natural that we should pause to glance at the long road we have travelled. For over forty years our pages have been open to the most progressive and practical facts, theories and methods of librarianship; our contributors have included almost every librarian who has held an important office; and we have always welcomed the work of younger, untried men who seemed to have promise— many of whom have indeed fulfilled it. In the strain and stress of the First World War we maintained interest and forwarded the revisions in library methods which adapted them to the after‐war order. Today we have similar, even severer, problems before us, and we hope to repeat the service we were then able to give. In this we trust that librarians, who have always regarded THE LIBRARY WORLD with affection, will continue to support us and be not tempted because of temporary stringency, to make a victim of a journal which has given so long and so independent a service.

Details

New Library World, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Chris Sugnet

Companies that supply libraries with automation technology are part of the computer‐industry marketplace. However, vendors that serve the library component of this…

Abstract

Companies that supply libraries with automation technology are part of the computer‐industry marketplace. However, vendors that serve the library component of this marketplace face problems not typical of the industry as a whole. Significant and unique problems include the protracted selection processes employed by libraries, the very slow and drawn‐out payment cycles, the dependence of the libraries on vendors, and the adversarial relationships that frequently exist between the libraries and vendors. These, and related issues, are discussed by representatives of eight prominent automation firms: Joseph R. Matthews (INLEX), James J. Michael (Data Research Associates), Harry Porteous (Geac), Gene Robinson (CLSI), Stephen R. Salmon (Carlyle), Stephen Silberstein (Innovative Interfaces), Phyllis Bova Spies (OCLC Local Systems), and Harriet Valázques (Utlas).

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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