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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Tanmay De Sarkar

The study demonstrates how libraries are incorporating photo-sharing applications into the collection development and service provision to encourage improved user…

Abstract

Purpose

The study demonstrates how libraries are incorporating photo-sharing applications into the collection development and service provision to encourage improved user participation around digital inclusion. Investigating the steps to increase accessibility to photo-sharing sites and current photo-sharing practices, the paper seeks to highlight the extent of implementation across the world.

Design/methodology/approach

Stratified sampling method was used to select libraries from four continents. Content analysis was used to collect data from 160 libraries along the lines of evaluation models prepared for the purpose.

Findings

With the comparative account of implementation of photo-sharing apps, the study showcases the relevance of different approaches adopted by libraries and also presents an overview of the implementation with supportive examples.

Research limitations/implications

The present investigation is limited to selected libraries of four continents and restricted to English websites only. The study may further be extended to include other types of libraries in different areas, including libraries using non-English websites, to get a fuller picture of implementation.

Originality/value

The paper makes an attempt to improve the understanding of the budding library professionals toward the usage pattern of photo-sharing sites. The guidelines, based on a brief synthesis of the functions/purposes of photo-sharing sites, will make a stronger case for the implications of this research to future photo-sharing practices.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Aqdas Malik, Kari Hiekkanen, Amandeep Dhir and Marko Nieminen

The popularity of Facebook photo sharing has not only seen a surge in the number of photos shared but also has raised various issues concerning user privacy and…

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1802

Abstract

Purpose

The popularity of Facebook photo sharing has not only seen a surge in the number of photos shared but also has raised various issues concerning user privacy and self-disclosure. Recent literature has documented the increasing interest of the research community in understanding various privacy issues concerning self-disclosures on Facebook. However, little is known about how different privacy issues, trust and activity influence users’ intentions to share photos on Facebook. To bridge this gap, a research model was developed and tested to better understand the impact of privacy concerns, privacy awareness and privacy-seeking on trust and actual photo sharing activity and subsequently on photo sharing intentions. This study aims to examine the consequences of various facets of privacy associated with photo sharing activity on Facebook.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional data from 378 respondents were collected and analysed using partial least squares modelling.

Findings

The results revealed a significant relationship between various aspects of privacy, including awareness and protective behaviour, with trust and activity. Furthermore, trust and users’ photo sharing activity significantly impact photo sharing intentions on Facebook.

Originality/value

This study contributes new knowledge concerning various privacy issues and their impact on photo sharing activity and trust. The study also proposes implications that are highly relevant for social networking sites, media agencies and organisations involved in safeguarding the privacy of online users.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2016

Aqdas Malik, Kari Hiekkanen and Marko Nieminen

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender and age differences regarding various aspects of privacy, trust, and activity on one of the most popular Facebook activity …

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2223

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender and age differences regarding various aspects of privacy, trust, and activity on one of the most popular Facebook activity – “photo sharing.”

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected using an online survey hosted by a web-based survey service for three weeks during December 2014-January 2015. The target audience comprised of Facebook users over 18 years engaged in sharing their photos on the platform.

Findings

Women and young Facebook users are significantly more concerned about the privacy of their shared photos. Meanwhile, users from older age groups are less active in using the site, in sharing photos, and in taking privacy-related protective measures. Interestingly, despite having more privacy concerns, young Facebook users display higher trust levels toward the platform than older users. Overall, in the study, there was an extremely significant difference in privacy attitudes among people under and over 35 years of age.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study is new knowledge regarding the gender and age differences in various privacy-related aspects, trust, and activity. Findings from the study broadens the overall understanding of how these issues positively/negatively influence the photo-sharing activity on Facebook.

Details

Program, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Book part
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Angela Paradise

Digital cameras and social networking have made photo-taking and photo-sharing more ubiquitous than ever before. In recent years, scholars and the popular press have…

Abstract

Digital cameras and social networking have made photo-taking and photo-sharing more ubiquitous than ever before. In recent years, scholars and the popular press have raised concerns over the practice of posting photographs on social networking sites, especially when the images contain problematic or incriminating content. These concerns are often directed toward college students, who are among the most active users of social media. To that end, this chapter offers a comprehensive overview of the extent and emerging research pertaining to college students' photo-sharing habits on social networking sites. Much of our attention focuses on Facebook, which has emerged as the largest and fastest growing photo-sharing Web site in the world. While research on text-based disclosure will be addressed, a greater emphasis is placed on college students' photo-related behaviors, including uploading, viewing, tagging, and untagging photos. Further, this chapter discusses research on problematic or damaging content in college students' photos posted on Facebook, including depictions of alcohol use, drug use, and sexual promiscuity. This chapter provides a glimpse of some recent data (collected by the author) from a national sample of U.S. college students, which further shed light on their experiences and attitudes regarding their photo-related Facebook behaviors, the types of incriminating photos they report posting, and the consequences they have experienced due to visual images shared by themselves or others on Facebook. Finally, this chapter concludes with a discussion of the strategies utilized by college administrators, faculty, athletic coaches, and others within higher education to address the concerns and consequences often associated with college students and the photographs they share on Facebook and other social networking sites.

Details

Misbehavior Online in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-456-6

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Book part
Publication date: 31 August 2018

Elisa Serafinelli

Abstract

Details

Digital Life on Instagram
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-495-4

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Mike Thelwall and Farida Vis

Despite the on going shift from text-based to image-based communication in the social web, supported by the affordances of smartphones, little is known about the new image…

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4084

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the on going shift from text-based to image-based communication in the social web, supported by the affordances of smartphones, little is known about the new image sharing practices. Both gender and platform type seem likely to be important, but it is unclear how. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper surveys an age-balanced sample of UK Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat and WhatsApp image sharers with a range of exploratory questions about platform use, privacy, interactions, technology use and profile pictures.

Findings

Females shared photos more often overall and shared images more frequently on Snapchat, but males shared more images on Twitter, particularly for hobbies. Females also tended to have more privacy-related concerns but were more willing, in principle, to share pictures of their children. Females also interacted more through others’ images by liking and commenting on them. Both genders used supporting apps but in different ways: females applied filters and posted to albums whereas males retouched photos and used photo organising apps. Finally, males were more likely to be alone in their profile pictures.

Practical implications

Those designing visual social web communication strategies to reach out to users should consider the different ways in which platforms are used by males and females to optimise their message for their target audience.

Social implications

There are clear gender and platform differences in visual communication strategies. Overall, males may tend to have more informational and females more relationship-based, skills or needs.

Originality/value

This is the first detailed survey of electronic image sharing practices and the first to systematically compare the current generation of platforms.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2013

Emma Stuart

The chapter aims to highlight developments in photography over the last two centuries, with an emphasis on the switch from analog to digital, and the emergence of Web 2.0…

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter aims to highlight developments in photography over the last two centuries, with an emphasis on the switch from analog to digital, and the emergence of Web 2.0 technologies, online photo management sites, and camera phones.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter is a culmination of some of the key literature and research papers on photography, Web 2.0, Flickr, camera phones, and tagging, and is based on the author’s opinion and interpretation.

Findings

The chapter reports on how the switch from analog to digital has changed the methods for capturing, organizing, and sharing photographs. In addition, the emergence of Web 2.0 technologies and camera phones have begun to fundamentally change the way that people think about images and the kinds of things that people take photographs of.

Originality/value

The originality of the chapter lies in its predictions about the future direction of photography. The chapter will be of value to those interested in photography, and also to those responsible for the future development of photographic technology.

Details

New Directions in Information Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-559-3

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2017

Sanja Božić and Tamara Jovanović

This study examines how travel-related patterns of behavior on Facebook (FB) differ among users of different gender, age, and education. The authors assumed that females…

Abstract

This study examines how travel-related patterns of behavior on Facebook (FB) differ among users of different gender, age, and education. The authors assumed that females, young, and more educated people are more active in using FB for travel-related purposes and that the results will show a significant difference in their travel-related behavior patterns. Data about respondent’s travel-related behavior on FB were collected through an online survey (Google Docs) through the FB page named “The research on behaviors of FB users.” The study applies the multivariate general linear model (GLM) on the data collected from the total of 793 respondents. The results show that travel-related statuses respondents post on FB are generally about their travel destination. The main findings indicate that women, more educated, and older people are the ones who are the most active in sharing their travel-related information and are therefore target groups for promoting travel destinations via electronic word of mouth (eWOM). The study suggests target groups for promoting travel destinations via eWOM and it is the first research of this type done on a Serbian sample.

Details

Consumer Behavior in Tourism and Hospitality Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-690-7

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2010

Sharifah Fatimah Syed-Ahmad, Dayangku Ida Nurul-Fitri Pengiran-Kahar, Ali Medabesh and Jamie Murphy

This chapter examines a popular online trend—photo-sharing—in an understudied region, the League of Arab States. In contrast to online information from official bodies…

Abstract

This chapter examines a popular online trend—photo-sharing—in an understudied region, the League of Arab States. In contrast to online information from official bodies, anyone with Internet access can view and create destination photos. This study first searched for destination photos on Flickr.com, a popular photo-sharing website, from 22 Arab countries, and then content analyzed 589 Muslim and travel photos. The key results included Egypt with the most destination photos and Saudi Arabia with the most Muslim images. Common Muslim images were mosques and women with headscarves. This chapter shows that Flickr photos represent Arab images and are possible destination recommendations.

Details

Tourism in the Muslim World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-920-6

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2013

Wendy Abbott, Jessie Donaghey, Joanna Hare and Peta Hopkins

The purpose of this paper is to describe the industry panel session hosted by Bond University Library at the Australian Library and Information Association's Information…

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12556

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the industry panel session hosted by Bond University Library at the Australian Library and Information Association's Information Online 2013 Conference. The panel was held to discuss the use and implications of professional Instagram profiles. The panel included a professional photographer, an internet marketing expert, a social media expert, a librarian and a social media‐savvy student. The inclusion of a range of perspectives from outside the library aimed to provide a holistic approach to the institutional use of Instagram and to provide inspiration. The panel took place on Wednesday 13 February 2013 in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The panel discussion covered three broad topic areas: the popularity of Instagram and listening to your audience. The risks, limitations and disadvantages of using Instagram. Engagement with followers and measuring the value of Instagram. Throughout the panel session live mobile polling was used to gather feedback and responses from the audience in regards to their photosharing practices. Real examples from Instagram profiles were shared to stimulate discussion. The session concluded with a Q&A session from the audience.

Findings

The session was attended by approximately 80 delegates. The results of the mobile polling will be included in the body of the article. Based on feedback from delegates on Twitter and Facebook (which was collated via Storify) the session was perceived as a useful introduction to a professional exploration of Instagram and photo sharing.

Practical implications

The session was an opportunity for conference delegates to hear about Instagram use from professionals in other fields. Each panel member contributed a unique perspective on the use of Instagram. In particular, the inclusion of a current Bond University student on the panel allowed for a customer's perspective on the library's use of Instagram. This discussion and the feedback gathered from the audience has formed the basis for further evidence‐based research.

Originality/value

To date, few libraries are using Instagram. This discussion on the professional use of Instagram contributes to the body of knowledge about library social media use. It also extends the conversation to include mobile photo sharing, an area which has not been well addressed in the literature. This panel was unique in that it brought together professionals from other environments to reflect on library use of Instagram.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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