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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Peggy Ng, Daisy Lee, Phoebe Wong and Regan Lam

Little research has been done on how university information sources influence advice-seeking attitude, intention, and behavior between students with high and low…

Abstract

Purpose

Little research has been done on how university information sources influence advice-seeking attitude, intention, and behavior between students with high and low susceptibility to online information. Our study addressed this gap by empirically demonstrating the role that students’ susceptibility to online information plays in terms of the effect of attitude, social norm and perceived behavioral control on their advice-seeking intention and behavior using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). The purpose of this study is to examine differences in the susceptibility to online sources on students’ advice-seeking behavior when making an institution choice.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey was involved, and this empirical study was performed on the basis of a sample of 621 students from publicly-funded high schools in Hong Kong. Multigroup analysis (MGA) was conducted to (i.e. students with high susceptibility to online sources/ students with low susceptibility to online sources) to examine students’ behavioral intention regarding advice seeking about institution choice. 10;

Findings

The results of the study revealed that students with high susceptibility to online information were likely to be influenced by the social norm in applying the TPB model. Conversely, students with low susceptibility to online information had low intention to seek advice from others as they are independent and noninformation seekers. Implications for higher education institutions are discussed.

Originality/value

This study provides a modified version of the TPB model while also demonstrating how students with high/low susceptibility to online sources affect their behavioral intention to seek advice from others about making a university choice. Also, this study provides insights into institutions regarding the promotion of marketing information via online and offline sources.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Phoebe Wong, Daisy Lee and Peggy M.L. Ng

A fuller understanding of the information search behaviour of prospective students in the digital era is one of the keys to success in university recruitment. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

A fuller understanding of the information search behaviour of prospective students in the digital era is one of the keys to success in university recruitment. The purpose of this paper is to investigate students’ university choice factors in relation to the online environment.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 637 samples from 11 private higher education institutions were collected and tested against assumptions before performing statistical analysis including exploratory factor analysis and mean comparison.

Findings

The findings revealed that there are some significant differences in gender and academic discipline in the use of the internet to search for university information. In addition, four constructs of university information were identified that are perceived as important by students in their search behaviour: “university reputation”, “eligibility and affordability”, “teaching and learning” and “university tangibility”. The outcomes of this research provide some noteworthy insights which have numerous strategic digital marketing implications.

Originality/value

While most existing studies have explored types of social media apps or online channels that prospective students use, little research has touched on students’ university choice factors in relation to the online environment. Responding to Constantinides and Zinck Stagno (2011) and Hemsley-Brown et al.’s (2016) call, this paper aims to address this research gap by investigating students’ university information search in relation to the online environment.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 23 December 2019

Phoebe Wong, Peggy M.L. Ng, Daisy Lee and Regan Lam

Understanding the influences in the decision-making process of prospective students when choosing a university is crucial in student recruitment. The purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding the influences in the decision-making process of prospective students when choosing a university is crucial in student recruitment. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of perceived source credibility on attitudes and intentions towards taking advice from significant others (e.g. parents, peers and teachers) on university choice.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 626 samples from eight government-subsidised secondary schools were collected and tested using the component-based structural equation modelling of partial least squares.

Findings

The findings verified factors of source credibility that determine prospective students’ attitudes towards taking advice from others. Attitudes and subjective norms explained 49 per cent of the variance in intention to take advice from others on university choice. The findings of the present study provide practical marketing insights for enrolment and recruitment managers.

Originality/value

While most studies focus on students’ university choice in the recruitment process, studies on perceived source credibility of significant others in the university choice decision-making process are limited.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2018

Jacqueline Cumming, Phoebe Dunn, Lesley Middleton and Claire O’Loughlin

The purpose of this paper is to report on the origins, development and early impacts of a Health Care Home (HCH) model of care being rolled out around New Zealand (NZ).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the origins, development and early impacts of a Health Care Home (HCH) model of care being rolled out around New Zealand (NZ).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on a literature review on HCHs and related developments in primary health care, background discussions with key players, and a review of significant HCH implementation documents.

Findings

The HCH model of care is emerging from the sector itself and is being tailored to local needs and to meet the needs of local practices. A key focus in NZ seems to be on business efficiency and ensuring sustainability of general practice – with the assumption that freeing up general practitioner time for complex patients will mean better care for those populations. HCH models of care differ around the world and NZ needs its own evidence to show the model’s effectiveness in achieving its goals.

Research limitations/implications

It is still early days for the HCH model of care in NZ and the findings in this paper are based on limited evidence. Further evidence is needed to identify the model’s full impact over the next few years.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to explore the HCH model of care in NZ.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Melissa Rikiatou Kana Kenfack and Ali Öztüren

It is salient to be acquainted with the key elements that determine educational tourists’ decision in selecting an overseas destination while considering the rise of…

Abstract

It is salient to be acquainted with the key elements that determine educational tourists’ decision in selecting an overseas destination while considering the rise of international competition amidst nations concerning international students. There has been a growth in the number of nations committed to attracting educational tourists. This issue is evident in countries involved in higher education (HE), such as Northern Cyprus, identified as an edu-tourism destination. Northern Cyprus can attract a whopping number of tourists, and the higher population is most likely to be made up of international students regardless of its interdiction on direct flights and political pressure. This chapter centres on analysing educational tourists’ motivators in selecting a tourism education destination abroad and on revealing effective recruitment and promotion plans towards attracting them. The chapter includes the descriptions and discussions of educational tourism, the HE industry over the years, globalisation and internationalisation of educational tourism, factors influencing educational tourists’ decision-making process and key elements influencing educational tourists’ decisions in HE institutions. At the end of the chapter, a case study is presented that reports the findings of interviews with educational tourists, overseas recruitment agents and Eastern Mediterranean University staff responsible for promoting the institution. The results identified eight factors affecting educational tourists’ decisions on study destination. Those factors comprise cost, ease of access, location, social factors, quality of education, instruction language, cultural environment and communication quality. The sub-factors of the main eight factors are scholarships, destination’s scenery, safety, friends’ and relatives’ influence and cultural differences. This chapter brings a significant knowledge about the motives that affect educational tourists in selecting at a particular HE destination. Based on the study’s findings, educational institutions may consider various recommendations to redesign their strategies towards attracting educational tourists more effectively. Generally, this study promotes an apprehension about the diverse elements that affect educational tourists’ selection of a destination study. An in-depth understanding of these factors will help education institutions’ decision-makers better develop plans of action to provide desired services to educational tourists, attract and keep them in return.

Details

Global Perspectives on Recruiting International Students: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-518-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Low Sui Pheng

China is among one of the oldest civilizations in the world. The massive land mass of China also means that the Chinese people are subject to weather extremes as well as…

Abstract

China is among one of the oldest civilizations in the world. The massive land mass of China also means that the Chinese people are subject to weather extremes as well as topographical variety in a country which cuts across alpine heights, treacherous deserts, lush valleys, dusty plains and lengthy rivers. With these weather extremes as the backdrop, it is crucial for the Chinese people to develop appropriate environmental control techniques for their dwellings as well as to ensure the structural integrity of their buildings. This paper discusses the protection, heating, anti‐seismic and dampness techniques developed and implemented in ancient China. It also documents the measures taken by the ancient Chinese to ensure the structural integrity of their buildings. The examples highlighted in this paper suggest that the building science principles adopted in ancient China remain relevant in the construction industry today.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Nadine Mellor, Phoebe Smith, Colin Mackay and David Palferman

In Great Britain, the ‘”Management Standards” were launched in 2004 and formally published in 2007 by the Health and Safety Executive to help organizations manage…

Abstract

Purpose

In Great Britain, the ‘”Management Standards” were launched in 2004 and formally published in 2007 by the Health and Safety Executive to help organizations manage work‐related stress. The purpose of this paper is to examine how these Standards are translated into organizational practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses case studies carried out in five large organizations drawn from the public and private sectors in Great Britain.

Findings

Senior management commitment and worker participation are key to managing work‐related stress and are commonly reported across organizations, although to variable form and depth. The solution chosen to identify stress issues is a short assessment of all staff via annual staff surveys, coupled with in‐depth assessments of groups at risk. Common practice also includes combining individual and organizational interventions. One significant challenge emerges as the translation from identified stress issues to focussed interventions and their evaluation.

Research limitations/implications

The implementation processes outlined in this study are by no means exhaustive due to the small sample size but are consistent with previous research.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that the HSE Management Standards approach for dealing with stress issues is do‐able. Refining the information in the HSE guidance on implementing and evaluating interventions and broadening the current focus on organization‐level interventions is needed.

Originality/value

Publication of case studies of the implementation of the Management Standards has been limited. This paper illustrates the efforts made by large organizations to integrate national guidance on stress and this could be used for guiding and improving stress management in similar work settings.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Robin M. Kowalski, Gary W. Giumetti, Amber N. Schroeder and Heather H. Reese

Although media and research accounts of cyber bullying suggest this misbehavior is localized primarily among middle school students, and that its frequency decreases with…

Abstract

Although media and research accounts of cyber bullying suggest this misbehavior is localized primarily among middle school students, and that its frequency decreases with age, this chapter presents empirical data showing that cyber bullying occurs with considerable frequency among college students across multiple domains of life, specifically school and work. In Study 1, 28 male and 82 female undergraduate students completed a survey examining their online activities as well as their experiences with cyber bullying. Over 30% of the participants indicated that their first experience with cyber bullying was in college. No gender differences were observed with regard to victimization or perpetration, except with online gaming where males reported a higher rate of victimization than females. With regard to personality differences among victims and perpetrators, victims were lower in agreeableness than non-victims. Study 2 examined the prevalence of cyber bullying among 107 college students at work, as well as the negative outcomes linked to the experience of workplace cyber bullying. Nearly a third of the college student sample reported having been the target of cyber bullying within the past six months. Individuals in jobs in which the Internet is essential and racial minorities reported higher rates of cyber bullying at work. Additionally, cyber bullying was positively linked to several negative emotions, as well as burnout and job search effort. These findings have important implications not only for potential negative outcomes that college students may be facing at school and at work but also for organizational justice issues, as differential treatment at work can lead to lawsuits and other negative work outcomes.

Details

Misbehavior Online in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-456-6

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Naresh K. Malhotra

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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