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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Phillip W. Bowen

Discusses training, development and quality cultures in organizations. Contends that deskilling the workforce in order to improve efficiency and productivity is at odds…

Abstract

Discusses training, development and quality cultures in organizations. Contends that deskilling the workforce in order to improve efficiency and productivity is at odds with creating a quality culture. Explains why a quality culture is important and how one may be achieved.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Phillip Bowen

Raises the question why society relies on ranking and grading fromthe first day of school, through the educational system, into theworking environment. Goes on to discuss…

Abstract

Raises the question why society relies on ranking and grading from the first day of school, through the educational system, into the working environment. Goes on to discuss the effects of extrinsic forces on intrinsic attributes and describes and assesses the concerns/views of theorists such as Deming, Latzko and Bramham. Ranking affects us all throughout the whole western world. Indeed it is pervasive throughout the world. Ranking is a fundamental cornerstone of the present education system and is being further developed within organizations by means such as performance appraisal, target setting, merit system, etc. Suggests that ranking should be replaced by co‐operation and that recognition of the need to change is required. This may require government legislation. It also has to be encouraged by those who develop education and training policies.

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Training for Quality, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Book part
Publication date: 20 March 2007

James Barrese

The insurance industry often experiences criticism for unethical and frequently illegal activities. This document suggests that insurers operate in an uncompetitive…

Abstract

The insurance industry often experiences criticism for unethical and frequently illegal activities. This document suggests that insurers operate in an uncompetitive environment and that the nature of insurer operations leads otherwise ethical individuals in the direction of questionable ethical decisions throughout the operations of an insurance company.

Details

Insurance Ethics for a More Ethical World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-431-7

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Sameera Mubarak

This paper aims to identify organizations’ information security issues and to explore dynamic, organizational culture and contingency theories to develop an implementable…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify organizations’ information security issues and to explore dynamic, organizational culture and contingency theories to develop an implementable framework for information security systems in human service organizations (HSOs) based soundly in theory and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper includes a critical review of global information security management issues for HSOs and relevant multi-disciplinary organizational theories to address them.

Findings

Effective information security management can be particularly challenging to HSO because of their use of volunteer staff in a borderless electronic environment. Organizations’ lack of recognition of the need for staff awareness of information security threats and for training in secure work practices, particularly in terms of maintaining clients’ privacy and confidentiality, is a major issue. The dynamic theory of organizational knowledge creation, organizational culture theory and contingency theory were identified as the most suitable theoretical perspectives to address this issue and underpin an effective information security management framework for HSOs.

Research limitations/implications

The theory-based framework presented here has not been tested in practice. Such testing will be carried out in further research.

Originality/value

Currently, there is no framework for information security systems in HSOs. The framework developed here provides a foundation on which HSO can build information security systems specific to their needs.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Book part
Publication date: 23 May 2017

Andrew C. Wicks and Jeffrey S. Harrison

This chapter highlights some of the tensions and most promising points of convergence between the strategic management and stakeholder theory literatures. We briefly…

Abstract

This chapter highlights some of the tensions and most promising points of convergence between the strategic management and stakeholder theory literatures. We briefly examine the early development of both areas, identifying some of the background assumptions and choices that informed how the fields evolved, and how these factors led the two fields to engage in scholarly pursuits that seldom intersected for a period of years, followed by a renewal of interest among strategists in themes that are central to stakeholder theory. From this discussion, we develop a larger agenda with specific topics as examples of areas that offer promise for integrative research that can advance knowledge in both fields. Our vision of the future is one in which the larger aspirations of scholars in strategy and stakeholder theory are more fully realized with human purposes, broadly defined, as the focal point.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Duane Windsor

Corporate social responsibility is one of the earliest and key conceptions in the academic study of business and society relations. This article examines the future of…

Abstract

Corporate social responsibility is one of the earliest and key conceptions in the academic study of business and society relations. This article examines the future of corporate social responsibility. Bowen's (1953) key question concerned whether the interests of business and society merge in the long ran. That question is assessed in the present and future contexts. There seem to be distinctly anti‐responsibility trends in recent academic literature and managerial views concerning best practices. These trends raise significant doubts about the future status of corporate social responsibility theory and practice. The vital change is that a leitmotif of wealth creation progressively dominates the managerial conception of responsibility. The article provides a developmental history of the corporate social responsibility notion from the Progressive Era forward to the corporate social performance framework and Carroll's pyramid of corporate social responsibilities. There are three emerging alternatives or competitors to responsibility: (1) an economic conception of responsibility; (2) global corporate citizenship; and (3) stakeholder management practices. The article examines and assesses each alternative. The article then assesses the prospects for business responsibility in a global context. Two fundamentals of social responsibility remain: (1) the prevailing psychology of the manager; and (2) the normative framework for addressing how that psychology should be shaped. Implications for practice and scholarship are considered.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Nicholas Hoover Wilson

This paper considers the East India Company’s emergence as a territorial power from the 1760s until the revocation of most of its commercial functions in 1834. While this…

Abstract

This paper considers the East India Company’s emergence as a territorial power from the 1760s until the revocation of most of its commercial functions in 1834. While this period has been a key episode for historians of the British Empire and of South Asia, social scientists have struggled with the Company’s ambiguous nature. In this paper, I propose that a profitable way to grasp the Company’s transformation is to consider it as a global strategic action field. This perspective clarifies two key processes in the Company’s transition: the enlargement of its territorial possessions; and the increased exposure of its patrimonial network to intervention from British metropolitan politics. To further suggest the utility of this analytic perspective, I synthesize evidence from various sources, including data concerning the East India Court of Directors and the career histories of Company servants in two of its key administrative regions, Bengal and Madras, during this period of transition.

Details

Chartering Capitalism: Organizing Markets, States, and Publics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-093-7

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Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2016

Amy M. Hageman and Dann G. Fisher

Tax professionals in public accounting firms must meet professional standards in working with their clients, but may also face pressure from both their clients and firms…

Abstract

Tax professionals in public accounting firms must meet professional standards in working with their clients, but may also face pressure from both their clients and firms when making ethical decisions. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of client factors on tax professionals’ ethical decision-making. Furthermore, we also investigate how client service climate and different ethical climate types affect these ethical decisions. Based on an experimental design with 149 practicing tax professionals, results indicate that tax professionals are not swayed by client importance or social interaction with the client when making ethical decisions. However, tax professionals are more likely to engage in ethical behavior when their own accounting firm monitors and tracks the quality of client service, whereas unethical behavior is more common when public accounting firms emphasize using personal ethical beliefs in decision-making. The results of the study suggest the importance of strong policies and procedures to promote ethical decision-making in firms.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-973-2

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Emily Erikson and Sampsa Samila

This paper uses the case of the English East India Company to consider the impact of colonialization on patterns of trade. The East India Company went through a commercial…

Abstract

This paper uses the case of the English East India Company to consider the impact of colonialization on patterns of trade. The East India Company went through a commercial and a colonial period in Asia and therefore provides a rare case in which fixed national effects are held constant while the degree of colonialism varies. We use this variation to consider the impact of colonial institutions on the degree of concentration in overseas trade. We find that the onset of colonialism is linked to increasing inequality in the distribution of traffic across ports. This finding is significant because of the relationship between overseas trade and the potential for long-term economic development: the development trajectories of the individual ports were likely to have been affected by these different rates of trade. Our findings also highlight how the negotiation between political and commercial goals in early modern trade and imperialism produced different macro-structural outcomes for global trade patterns.

Details

Chartering Capitalism: Organizing Markets, States, and Publics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-093-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2014

Joey Gormly

It is unclear as to what extent sustainable procurement is being practised in Ireland and what barriers there are to implementing it in organisations. This study provides…

Abstract

It is unclear as to what extent sustainable procurement is being practised in Ireland and what barriers there are to implementing it in organisations. This study provides the first complete insight into the use of sustainable procurement in Irish commercial semi-state bodies. It explores the extent and type of use of sustainable procurement plus identifies and examines the challenges to its use. A deductive approach is utilised to determine the barriers. Eleven participants, nine from the commercial semistate bodies and two experts with knowledge of this subject, are interviewed using semi-structured questions. The research findings show that sustainable procurement is being practised in the majority of the commercial semi-state bodies. Definition of sustainable procurement, the absence of mandatory guidelines, cost, time and a dearth of sustainable procurement knowledge by suppliers are some of the main barriers put forward by participants.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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