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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Li Tang and Philip Shapira

Recent studies report that China is becoming a leading nation in the quantity of scientific output, including in the emerging field of nanotechnology. In nanotechnology…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent studies report that China is becoming a leading nation in the quantity of scientific output, including in the emerging field of nanotechnology. In nanotechnology, bibliometric measures based on citations also indicate improvements in the research impacts of Chinese scientific papers. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of international collaboration, including the role of knowledge moderation through Chinese researchers who collaborate in both domestic and international scientific cooperation, on the impacts of Chinese nanotechnology research publications.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a nanotechnology publication dataset, bibliometric analysis and statistical testing are adopted to explore the issues raised in the study.

Findings

International collaboration, through direct collaboration and indirectly through Chinese knowledge moderators, has a positive impact on the quality of Chinese research, controlling for language, discipline, research capacity, and other factors.

Originality/value

The concept of a Chinese knowledge moderator is introduced to identify Chinese researchers who bridge scientific worlds by publishing scientific papers with both domestic and international colleagues. This concept is operationalized to capture the indirect impacts in China of international knowledge linkages and spillovers including those associated with overseas Chinese researchers and with overseas returnees.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Li Tang, Philip Shapira and Yu Meng

This paper aims to explore pathways and issues of small business technological commercialization in China, probing the particular characteristics of the Chinese context…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore pathways and issues of small business technological commercialization in China, probing the particular characteristics of the Chinese context and the ways in which innovation frameworks, institutions and business strategies are embedded.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine in detail the case of an innovative Chinese indigenous small firm engaged in innovative nanotechnology materials development. The strategies and push- and pull factors underlying the company’s innovation practices were investigated. The proposition that the institutional relationships formed to secure access to research expertise and aid business survival also influence the ways in which technology is commercialized was explored.

Findings

It was found that while technological development is company-driven, it is also highly connected to regional innovation structures and networks. This stimulates a “spin-in” rather than a university-led model of development, as this small firm embeds its technology and business development strategies in conjunction with partner organizations. Broader management and policy implications are discussed.

Originality/value

While China has rapidly expanded scientific research in emerging technologies such as nanotechnology, commercialization through the development of entrepreneurial technology-oriented small companies faces a series of challenges. New enterprises in the emerging area of nanotechnology encounter problems of technology transfer and intellectual property management, capital acquisition, market uncertainty and constrained access to global markets.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Philip Bromiley and Mark Washburn

This study aims to compare alternative search behaviors managers enact with regard to firm aspirations.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to compare alternative search behaviors managers enact with regard to firm aspirations.

Design/methodology/approach

The behavioral theory of the firm predicts that poor performance relative to aspiration levels leads to search for ways to raise performance over aspirations. Most researchers have assumed search leads to risk‐taking or innovation. However, firms might search for ways to raise performance without incurring additional risk, such as reducing expenses. This paper compares the two models of search using data on research and development (R&D) spending.

Findings

The results generally support the cost cutting argument; R&D spending increases monotonically with performance relative to social aspirations.

Research limitations/implications

These results suggest researchers need to consider searches that emphasize cost reduction, as well as searches that emphasize innovation.

Originality/value

Overall, this paper extends behavioral work on risk‐taking and R&D to provide a more complex view of the interactions between kinds of aspiration levels and both innovation and search behavior.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Yong Qiang Chen, Su Juan Zhang, Li Sha Liu and Jia Hu

Making the right bid/no-bid decision is critical to the success and development of construction contracting enterprises. Decision makers’ personal characteristics, such as…

Abstract

Purpose

Making the right bid/no-bid decision is critical to the success and development of construction contracting enterprises. Decision makers’ personal characteristics, such as risk perception and propensity, have great impact on bid/no-bid decisions, which is the major concern of this research. The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship among decision makers’ risk perception, risk propensity, and their bid/no-bid decision making of construction projects, as well as the factors influencing the risk perception and propensity.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, four hypotheses were proposed based on an extensive literature review. Experimental questionnaires were distributed to employees working in Chinese construction contracting enterprises with knowledge of construction bidding, and 134 valid questionnaires were obtained. Multivariate statistical analysis through SPSS 19.0 was used to analyze the acquired data.

Findings

Data analysis shows that in the context of international construction contracting: risk perception has a negative influence on bid/no-bid decision making; while risk propensity produces a positive influence and the probability and magnitude of potential gain or loss both have significant impacts on risk perception, and the probability plays a more important role.

Originality/value

This research studied the bid/no-bid decision making of construction projects from the new perspectives of risk perception and risk propensity of the decision makers.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Barrie Gunter

Abstract

Details

Children and Mobile Phones: Adoption, Use, Impact, and Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-036-4

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Book part
Publication date: 7 March 2013

Perry den Brok, Anna van der Want, Douwe Beijaard and Theo Wubbels

In this chapter, a model to understand teachers’ professional identity, appraisals and behaviours in the classroom is presented and illustrated with empirical data. It is…

Abstract

In this chapter, a model to understand teachers’ professional identity, appraisals and behaviours in the classroom is presented and illustrated with empirical data. It is argued that the comparison between interpersonal identity standards and interpersonal appraisals of classroom situations results in two types of emotions experienced by teachers. One type of emotion is the direct result of teachers’ interpretations of, and coping with, specific classroom events whereby their emotions are part of the appraisal process of situations and evaluated in the light of their interpersonal role identity standards. The second type of emotion emerges as a result of tensions or dilemmas of prolonged differences between appraisals and identity standards. It is argued that the Teacher Interpersonal Identity Role and Appraisal model is helpful for both researchers and practitioners to better understand, recognise and support beginning (and experienced) teachers with emotions that occur in the classroom, and to help stimulate both their personal as well as professional development.

Details

Emotion and School: Understanding how the Hidden Curriculum Influences Relationships, Leadership, Teaching, and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-651-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2013

Philip Leat and Cesar Revoredo‐Giha

The paper examines one of Scotland's major pork supply chains and seeks to identify the key risks and challenges involved in developing a resilient agri‐food supply…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examines one of Scotland's major pork supply chains and seeks to identify the key risks and challenges involved in developing a resilient agri‐food supply system, particularly with regard to primary product supply, and to show how risk management and collaboration amongst stakeholders can increase chain resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study involved in‐depth interviews with seven people involved in the chain and its management.

Findings

Reduced supply chain vulnerability to risks arose through horizontal collaboration amongst producers, and vertical collaboration with the processor and retailer. Producers improved market and price security, and pig performance. For the processor and retailer the collaboration generated greater security of supply of an assured quality, improved communication with suppliers, and reduced demand risk as they could assure consumers on quality, animal welfare and product provenance.

Research limitations/implications

The study's findings are based on the analysis of a particular supply chain, but the cooperative concerned currently produces over half of Scotland's weekly pig production.

Practical implications

The findings are highly transferable to other agri‐food supply chains. Producers' successful efforts to deal with different risks and the role of collaboration in enhancing chain resilience are illustrated.

Originality/value

The case is interesting because pigmeat supply profitability has been under constant pressure. It discusses the risks faced by all chain participants and the collective development of a chain which is relatively resilient to variations in price, production and supply.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Jing Li and Philip Pearce

The purpose of this paper is to identify dominant scams against domestic tourists in popular tourism cities in China. There are two questions of concern: what types of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify dominant scams against domestic tourists in popular tourism cities in China. There are two questions of concern: what types of scams do domestic tourists experience and are the patterns of scams different between the capital and regional cities? The social situation framework was employed to interpret the outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis facilitated by Leximancer software was applied to 102 Chinese travel blogs reporting experiences of being scammed in Beijing, Hangzhou, Xi’an, Sanya and Guilin. Clear themes and concepts emerged from the analysis of these travel reviews and differences in scamming patterns between Beijing and regional cities were identified.

Findings

The most frequently reported scams in the capital Beijing were linked to the chaotic environment at tourist attractions and the misbehaviours of tour agents. By way of contrast scams involving manipulating the weight and quality of products purchased were more common in regional cities. The differences between Beijing and other locations may lie in the greater monitoring of fraudulent practices in the capital. Additionally, the role of shills (confederates of the scammer) was highlighted in many of the scams studied.

Originality/value

Scams include a slightly less serious but still troublesome set of problems accompanying major crimes and assaults. Rare research specifically focussed on tourist scams despite substantive work discussing crimes against tourists as general. Implications of the present study lie in enriching the literature on scams against tourists. The analysis of scams as a special type of social situation proved to be insightful in directing attention to facets of the interaction thus providing connections to previous work and directions for further study. It is also promising to be developed to inform strategic approaches to creating a safer tourism environment in cities.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Barrie Gunter

Abstract

Details

Children and Mobile Phones: Adoption, Use, Impact, and Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-036-4

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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