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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Philip Ryley and John Virgo

This paper is based on a talk given by Philip Ryley and John Virgo to the Association of Pension Lawyers at their annual conference in Bournemouth in November 1998. In it…

Abstract

This paper is based on a talk given by Philip Ryley and John Virgo to the Association of Pension Lawyers at their annual conference in Bournemouth in November 1998. In it the authors provide an outline of some of the key legal issues that have arisen out of the pensions mis‐selling litigation.

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Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Philip Ryley and John Virgo

This paper is confined to an overview on the disciplinary and appeal procedures contained in the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000. The paper will not deal with…

Abstract

This paper is confined to an overview on the disciplinary and appeal procedures contained in the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000. The paper will not deal with market abuse, civil remedies, intervention or criminal prosecutions. It will, however, deal with discipline procedure and the appeal process. It is important to remember, when reading this paper, that the financial services industry still awaits the publication of the draft Enforcement, draft Supervision and draft Authorisation Manuals. The current expected publication date is August 2000. In addition, it is necesssary to distinguish between disciplinary measures affecting individuals and measures affecting businesses. This paper adopts the definitions in the Act and so the use of ‘authorised person’ refers to a business entity, and the use of ‘approved person’ refers to an individual. [Editor's note: A few days after this paper was written the draft Enforcement manual was published. The manual can be viewed at www.fsa.gov.uk.]

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Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

John Virgo and Philip Ryley

In this brief paper the authors consider the duties owed by professional indemnity insurance brokers to their insured clients. Given the prevalence of claims for financial…

Abstract

In this brief paper the authors consider the duties owed by professional indemnity insurance brokers to their insured clients. Given the prevalence of claims for financial mis‐selling this is an important issue of concern to all authorised advisers. Any failure to obtain or maintain cover leading to uninsured loss will naturally attract the potential attention of the broker’s own insurers. The authors summarise what the law expects of brokers in standard situations.

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Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

John Virgo and Philip Ryley

Section 1(1) of the Financial Services and Markets Act (the Act) provides: ‘the body corporate known as the Financial Services Authority (“the Authority” [the FSA]) is to…

Abstract

Section 1(1) of the Financial Services and Markets Act (the Act) provides: ‘the body corporate known as the Financial Services Authority (“the Authority” [the FSA]) is to have the functions conferred on it by or under this Act’.

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Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Philip Ryley and John Virgo

The Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (the Act) establishes extensive investigative powers and disciplinary powers that may be exercised by the Financial Services…

Abstract

The Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (the Act) establishes extensive investigative powers and disciplinary powers that may be exercised by the Financial Services Authority (FSA) in certain circumstances. The Act further empowers the FSA to take disciplinary action against approved persons, as well as authorised firms. This paper examines the circumstances in which senior managers may find themselves personally culpable for regulatory breaches and become the subject of disciplinary proceedings.

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Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Abstract

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Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

John Virgo and Philip Ryley

‘Fitness and propriety’ is a key qualifying condition of authorisation under the Financial Services and Markets Bill. Blandly stated, it is probably uncontroversial as a…

Abstract

‘Fitness and propriety’ is a key qualifying condition of authorisation under the Financial Services and Markets Bill. Blandly stated, it is probably uncontroversial as a condition of authorisation. How, in practice, fitness and propriety should be demonstrated to, inquired into and verified by the Financial Services Authority raise more difficult issues. This paper looks at the way in which these practical issues have been addressed by the courts and other regulatory regimes in the past. While past experience does not form a model for future guidance on these topics, it is a useful starting point from which to consider the draft Bill's approach to such matters. Since this paper was written, the Financial Services and Marketing Bill has been amended. The current version can be viewed at: www.parliament.the‐stationery‐office.co.uk

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2021

Lisa Barao, Anthony A. Braga, Brandon Turchan and Philip J. Cook

Clearance rates for nonfatal shootings, especially cases involving gang- and drug-related violence, are disturbingly low in many US cities. Using data from a previously…

Abstract

Purpose

Clearance rates for nonfatal shootings, especially cases involving gang- and drug-related violence, are disturbingly low in many US cities. Using data from a previously completed project in Boston, we explore the prospects for improving gang/drug nonfatal shooting cases by investing the same investigative effort found in similar gang/drug gun murder cases.

Design/methodology/approach

Our analyses primarily focus on a sample of 231 nonfatal shootings that occurred in Boston from 2010 to 2014. Logistic regressions are first used to analyze differences in the likelihood of case clearance for gang/drug nonfatal shooting cases relative to other nonfatal shooting cases. Independent samples t-tests are then used to compare the investigative characteristics of these two different kinds of nonfatal shootings. Next, independent samples t-tests are used to compare the investigation of gang/drug gun assaults relative to the investigation of very similar gang/drug gun homicides.

Findings

Results demonstrate that the odds of clearing gang/drug nonfatal shootings are 77.2% less likely relative to the odds of clearing nonfatal shootings resulting from other circumstances. This stark difference in clearance rates is not driven by diminished investigative effort, but investigative effort does matter. Relative to gang/drug gun assaults, gang/drug gun homicides have much higher clearance rates that are the result of greater investigative resources and effort that produces significantly more witnesses and evidence, and generate more forensic tests and follow-up investigative actions.

Originality/value

Gang- and drug-related violence generates a bulk of urban nonfatal shootings. Low clearance rates for nonfatal shootings undermine police efforts to hold offenders accountable, disrupt cycles of gun violence, and provide justice to victims. Police should make investments to improve investigative effort such as handling these cases with the same vigor as homicide cases.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Abigail L. Bristow and Alberto M. Zanni

Purpose – To examine the cost-effectiveness of UK government policy with respect to the mitigation of carbon emissions from the transport sector.Methodology/approach …

Abstract

Purpose – To examine the cost-effectiveness of UK government policy with respect to the mitigation of carbon emissions from the transport sector.

Methodology/approach – Existing policy as set out by the Department for Transport in Low Carbon Transport: A Greener Future is examined. This document elaborates a Low Carbon Transport Strategy intended to achieve annual emissions savings of 17.7 MtCO2 by 2020. A wide range of policy areas where further action could be taken to reduce carbon emissions are examined and their cost-effectiveness considered.

Findings – Measures that influence behaviour including smarter choices, eco-driving across modes, freight best practice and modest price increases are highly cost-effective. More cost-effective routes to saving 17.7 MtCO2 are identified, as are further cost-effective savings.

Originality/value – It appears that government targets could be delivered and indeed exceeded at lower cost than the Low Carbon Transport Strategy. However, policy development is influenced by a wide range of factors which help to explain why cost-effective measures are not always fully exploited.

Details

Transport and Climate Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-440-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Majid Al Sarrah, Mian M. Ajmal and Charilaos Mertzanis

The civil aviation sector in Dubai has been contributing to its economic development by enhancing transportation services, allowing for the establishment of trade links…

Abstract

Purpose

The civil aviation sector in Dubai has been contributing to its economic development by enhancing transportation services, allowing for the establishment of trade links, promoting tourism and providing job opportunities. Despite being a thriving sector of economic activity (Dubai was the third busiest airport in the world in 2018), a common understanding among the stakeholders on the sector’s long-term sustainability strategy is missing. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the identification of important sustainability indicators in the civil aviation sector in Dubai.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the stakeholder theory to identify sustainability indicators. It deploys a qualitative research design that collects data through multiple focus groups, and it accounts for the stakeholders’ views toward key sustainability indicators. This research classified stakeholders completely in a separate matrix preventing their integration and therefore the confounding of their views. The study addresses the complexity of sustainability in the sector and identifies key indicators based on comprehensive and valid data from different stakeholders. The study focuses separately on the three pillars of sustainability: social, economic and environmental sustainability and identifies sustainability indicators for each pillar from the views of stakeholders. The study uses thematic analysis to produce results by identifying themes according to the collected data.

Findings

The study finds that there is a lack of sustainability knowledge and awareness in the civil aviation sector in Dubai despite its buoyant growth and expansion. The results show that stakeholders highlight the importance of social sustainability indicators that value equitable development in the pursuit of business goals. They also value economic sustainability indicators that focus on changing consumption patterns and increasing preservation. They finally focus on environmental sustainability indicators that promote eco-efficiency and renewable energy. However, considerable differences exist among stakeholders regarding the importance and priority of their suggested indicators.

Practical implications

The implications of the study are theoretical and practical. In the case of the former, it would contribute toward the reduction of uncertainty in the civil aviation sector in Dubai regarding the policy actions required to improve the sector’s sustainability. It is done by identifying the stakeholders’ views on the key sustainability indicators for each pillar of sustainability. In the case of practical implications, the outcomes of the study highlight specific directions that policy actions should take. Although the results are local, they can have tentative global policy implications. Finally, the results of the study are instrumental in addressing the sustainability debate within the civil aviation sector not only in Dubai but also globally.

Originality/value

The study extends existing research efforts to identify sustainability indicators in the civil aviation sector by considering the three different pillars of sustainability and by accounting for the diverse stakeholders’ views on the identification of key sustainability indicators. The study should be extended to account for the role of technological readiness in the region of other innovative approaches in the current civil aviation sectors.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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