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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Anita Walsh and Philip Powell

The purpose of this paper is to explore how students, full-time and part-time, may be supported in becoming ambidextrous – developing “intrapreneurial” skills and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how students, full-time and part-time, may be supported in becoming ambidextrous – developing “intrapreneurial” skills and capabilities, as well as being introduced to more typical “entrepreneurial” activities. It is proposed that both perspectives will be necessary for future graduates.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper highlights the fast-changing nature of the economic and employment context and the future requirements for graduate skills. It analyses and evaluates a framework of curricular and extra-curricular activities which has been developed to address future skills needs. The paper uses a case study to illustrate the issue.

Findings

The paper concludes that with increasingly flexible career paths, there is a need for graduates to be prepared for portfolio careers in which they move between employment and self-employment. The development of an independent mindset which can identify and exploit innovation is therefore important.

Practical implications

The paper outlines an approach that has been implemented in a UK higher education institution to the development of innovation skills which is responsive to a wider range of students than the conventional cohort of young, full-time students.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of designing educational experiences which directly address students’ situations and experiences. It also identifies the role of work-based research in the development of an innovative mindset.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 4 August 2020

Adrian David Saville, Philip Powell, Tashmia Ismail-Saville and Morris Mthombeni

For discussion of social entrepreneurship in middle-income economies, emerging markets generally and Africa, specifically, Quali Health presents interesting questions…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

For discussion of social entrepreneurship in middle-income economies, emerging markets generally and Africa, specifically, Quali Health presents interesting questions about entrepreneurial funding, scaling and the interplay between social entrepreneurial activities and the informal sector.

Case overview/synopsis

South Africa’s primary health outcomes do not correspond to the country’s spending on public health, with South Africa ranking among the worst globally in the incidence of tuberculosis, HIV prevalence, infant mortality and life expectancy. In part, this poor outcome can be explained by high inequality in access to healthcare, which reflects South Africa’s grossly skewed income and wealth distributions, with the bulk of the country’s population reliant upon an underfunded, inefficient and poorly managed public health system. This substandard service for the working poor in South Africa’s townships with high population densities offered a profitable entrepreneurial opportunity to provide affordable and effective primary care with vast gains in quality and outcomes improved dignity for patients. After receiving her MBA, physician and entrepreneur Dr Nthabiseng Legoete self-funded the launch of Quali Health in 2017. The business model set out to disrupt healthcare delivery for South Africa’s poorest citizens. Drawing patients from the working poor in Diepsloot, Quali Health’s inaugural site was cash flow positive within five months when the facility hit only 30% of installed service capacity. With quick success, Dr Legoete faced the strategic question of how fast to scale and finance the expansion. She also considered a new micro-insurance product for her clientele.

Complexity academic level

For discussion of social entrepreneurship in middle-income economies, emerging markets generally and Africa, specifically, Quali Health presents interesting questions about entrepreneurial funding, scaling and the interplay between social entrepreneurial activities and the informal sector.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS: 3 Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Paul Jones

2687

Abstract

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Margi Levy, Philip Powell and Philip Yetton

This paper seeks to understand how strategic information systems (IS) alignment takes place in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

1661

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to understand how strategic information systems (IS) alignment takes place in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a qualitative and quantitative analysis of data from 27 cases.

Findings

A contingent model allows re‐interpretation of earlier findings that appear to be inconsistent. First, benefit realisation depends on alignment between IS and business strategies. Second, IS investment is frequently limited to supporting operations and transactions. Third, organizations with more sophisticated IS tend to perform less successfully than those with less complex systems, the greatest alignment and highest performance are reported for systems to improve efficiency, and organizations that adopt a low‐cost approach are unlikely to use IS strategically.

Research limitations/implications

The paper extends understanding of the contingent nature of SMEs' investment in, and use of, IS, and of the effect of market position on IS management. It provides guidelines by describing the dominant paths to alignment. The limitations are that the SME sample is not random, the scoring protocols rely on author coding, whether the research identifies cycles of alignment, alternative interpretations of path hierarchy, and if an SME's location uniquely defines its alignment path.

Originality/value

Performance is a function of the alignment between IS strategy and other business domains. However, prior research has focused on outcomes, rather than the processes by which alignment is developed. Using multiple case data, this paper investigates alignment in SMEs, explaining why different SMEs follow different paths to alignment. Four paths are identified, with the path chosen contingent on an SME's market position.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

William Golden and Philip Powell

This paper explores the use of inter‐organisational systems (IOS) and the impact they have on flexibility. The experiences of ten organisations that constitute two value…

Abstract

This paper explores the use of inter‐organisational systems (IOS) and the impact they have on flexibility. The experiences of ten organisations that constitute two value chains enrich and extend previous survey findings. The paper first defines flexibility, arguing that it has four dimensions: temporal, range, intention and focus. It then investigates inter‐organisational systems, assessing how they impact on organisational flexibility. The paper also demonstrates how the case firms perceive flexibility. Next the types of IOS used are outlined, followed by a discussion on how IOS technology affects flexibility. An analysis of the impact of IOS on the flexibility of the complete value chain is presented and conclusions drawn.

Details

International Journal of Agile Management Systems, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1465-4652

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Richard Vidgen, Diane Francis, Philip Powell and Maria Woerndl

Web‐based technologies are becoming an important way for small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) to acquire information systems capabilities to support business…

3372

Abstract

Web‐based technologies are becoming an important way for small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) to acquire information systems capabilities to support business transformation. This paper investigates the business, technology, and IS drivers for component‐based applications. Web service technology is identified as a key driver for SMEs to gain operational and strategic benefit from net‐sourced information systems. The role of Web services in SMEs is explored through application of Venkatraman's business transformation model. The Web‐service transformation model is applied to a case study of a SME that is adopting Web service technology. The case identifies the potential benefits for SMEs of Web service technology and considers the factors that enable successful Web service adoption.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Martin Hughes, William Golden and Philip Powell

This paper investigates the reasons underpinning the diverging adoption rates of different types of inter‐organisational systems (IOS) amongst small‐ to medium‐sized…

1909

Abstract

This paper investigates the reasons underpinning the diverging adoption rates of different types of inter‐organisational systems (IOS) amongst small‐ to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). It explores the evolution of IOS from traditional proprietary and closed systems to Internet‐based open, flexible systems. It illustrates, through the study of 25 SMEs, that the emergence of new Internet‐based IOS provides SMEs with a rich set of technologies that may fundamentally change the technological perspective of SMEs from reluctant, reactive, slow implementers of technology to enthusiastic, proactive, rapid innovators of technology. The paper suggests that positive experiences by SMEs of Web‐based electronic commerce and the continued desire of larger firms to achieve full compliance with their IOS will dramatically increase the adoption rate of Web‐enabled IOS.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Philip Powell

136

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Philip Powell

186

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Nigel Caldwell, Christine Harland, Philip Powell and Jurong Zheng

– The purpose of this paper is to understand the risks managers and individual supply chains perceive from e-business.

3453

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the risks managers and individual supply chains perceive from e-business.

Design/methodology/approach

This research takes a long-term, staged view of the risks managers and individual supply chains perceive from e-business. By taking a two-stage approach, investigating four supply chains at a three year interval, the research considers perceived risks from e-business and the extent to which these risks obtained.

Findings

E-business has the potential to deliver substantial benefits, but it also involves new and different risks. This research finds that small firms (SMEs) adopted a “watching brief” rather than implemented e-business. Between the two studies it emerges that e-business can support rather than detract from inter-organisational relationships. Global forces are in evidence in terms of low cost competition, but low cost competitors are not e-enabled.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations, pragmatism and opportunism in the sampling is acknowledged. For example, the work and concepts that led to the expectation of e-business dominating and decimating industrial supply chains may have been based in chains more open to external forces than the ones examined here. Further research is required that identifies the minimum critical mass necessary to retain national manufacturing capacity at a chain or sector level, and empirical work is needed on the suggested link between supply chain stability and certainty of payment. The cases here are based on four UK supply chains, so various chain forms are likely to have been excluded.

Originality/value

This research, by taking a staged approach and going back to the same chain and reviewing perceived risks, identifies how the build up of numerous – but small – events, for example factory closures, can aggregate over time to be just as significant as high profile, headline-worthy risks. Methods that produce a snapshot such as a one-off survey may be inadequate for fully exploring an area such as risk. Especially if the risks are hard to assess and are biased toward high profile events – catastrophic risks rather than accumulations of smaller, less noticeable risks.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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