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Article

Richard Walker and Philip Morgan

The pace of the development within the NHS initiated both by recent government reforms aimed at introducing a more businesslike attitude to health care, coupled with…

Abstract

The pace of the development within the NHS initiated both by recent government reforms aimed at introducing a more businesslike attitude to health care, coupled with advances in clinical medicine has necessitated a management response from the medial profession. To date, however, the management training of doctors remains sparse, and is almost non‐existent at medical undergraduate level due to the long demands of the clinical specialties. While the need for management development of doctors is recognised at postgraduate (Senior Registrar) level both access to and content of the training are strongly variable throughout the NHS in Wales. As Hadley and Forster (1993) note:—

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Management Research News, vol. 19 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article

Christopher Potter and Philip Morgan

The many changes in the NHS resulting from recent legislation, including allowing hospitals to “opt out” and become NHS trusts, coupled with a new culture of…

Abstract

The many changes in the NHS resulting from recent legislation, including allowing hospitals to “opt out” and become NHS trusts, coupled with a new culture of managerialism, emphasising service quality, employee commitment and value for money has led to an increase in service monitoring and inspection. It has also led to an increasing emphasis on quality and indirectly has brought professionalism and managerialism into direct conflict with each other (The Griffiths Report, 193 and Working for Patients, 1989).

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Management Research News, vol. 17 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article

Philip J. Morgan and Neil Nick Robson

The purpose of this paper is to explain UK Financial Services Authority (FSA) Policy Statement 09/15, Reforming Remuneration Practices in Financial Services, (the “Code”…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain UK Financial Services Authority (FSA) Policy Statement 09/15, Reforming Remuneration Practices in Financial Services, (the “Code”) which requires certain large banks, building societies and broker‐dealers in the UK to establish, implement and maintain remuneration policies that are consistent with and promote effective risk management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explains the background to the Code, including the FSA's views on bonuses and remuneration; describes the characteristics of the approximately 26 large firms to which the Code will apply; discusses the Code's principles concerning remuneration; details the timing of the key steps for implementation of the Code; explains information on remuneration firms must provide to the FSA; and discusses the FSA's plans for follow‐up.

Practical implications

The FSA is likely to publish similar remuneration guidelines that will extend to all FSA‐authorized firms.

Originality/value

The paper provides practical guidance from experienced financial services lawyers; a possible bellwether of future similar policies from financial regulators in other countries.

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Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Article

Through a survey of 200 employees working in five of the thirty establishments analysed in previous research about the microeconomic effects of reducing the working time…

Abstract

Through a survey of 200 employees working in five of the thirty establishments analysed in previous research about the microeconomic effects of reducing the working time (Cahier 25), the consequences on employees of such a reduction can be assessed; and relevant attitudes and aspirations better known.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Society and Business Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article

Philip Morgan and Jackie Lawson

Since 2010, Dorset HealthCare University NHS Trust has been running a Hidden Talents project seeking to better understand how mental health services can value the lived…

Abstract

Purpose

Since 2010, Dorset HealthCare University NHS Trust has been running a Hidden Talents project seeking to better understand how mental health services can value the lived experience of their staff. The purpose of this paper is to inform discussions on how clinicians and other staff can share their lived experience of mental health problems to improve the experience of people who access services, their carers and supporters and promote the wellbeing of all staff.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion paper was developed through the use of qualitative data collected through three focus groups. One of the focus groups represented people who are part of the Hidden Talents Project, one focus group had representatives of the different professional bodies and the third represented people who access services.

Findings

It was identified that there were two differing considerations between sharing personal experience one was sharing with people who access services, the other was sharing with colleagues and managers. It was identified that in order to safely share personal experience it needed to happen in an supportive organisational culture. A number of suggestions were made as to considered why, when, how and what to share with people who access services.

Research limitations/implications

This is not a formal piece of research, rather it is an exploration of a range of views and set out into a discussion document. Further action and research is required to explore this topic area in more detail.

Originality/value

At present a number of mental health services are beginning to address the value of lived experience in the workforce. Very little has been published exploring how people can share their live experience. This paper provides a starting point for these discussions.

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Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article

Richard Walker and Philip Morgan

Reports the results of a survey of 209 senior registrars and 269 consultants throughout Wales to identify the management development needs of doctors and ascertain their…

Abstract

Reports the results of a survey of 209 senior registrars and 269 consultants throughout Wales to identify the management development needs of doctors and ascertain their views of the value and utility of current management development course offerings in Wales. Finds that, currently, management development for doctors in Wales is unstructured and unco‐ordinated but, despite this, many doctors, especially senior registrars, appeared keen to increase their future involvement in management and held positive views regarding management and management development. The questionnaire also required doctors to rank order six managerial topics and their elements: financial, human resource, strategic, operational, service quality and self‐management. Of these, self‐management issues were rated highest and there was some congruity in the rankings of the six topics by senior registrars and the other three consultant categories. Overall, managing a budget, medical and clinical audit, negotiating skills and leadership skills were ranked highest for inclusion in management development while project management, quality circles and equal opportunities received the lowest ratings.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article

Daniel F.C. Crowley, Bruce J. Heiman, R. Charles Miller, Philip J. Morgan, Mark D. Perlow, David K.Y. Tang and Karishma Shah Page

The purpose of this paper is to summarize the Group of Thirty's recommendations and explain how they relate to other concurrent financial market regulatory initiatives in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarize the Group of Thirty's recommendations and explain how they relate to other concurrent financial market regulatory initiatives in the USA, UK, and Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper summarizes the report's four core recommendations, describes how they relate to recent reports by the US Treasury Department, the US Chamber of Commerce, and Committee on Capital Markets Regulation, and discusses how they may signal the direction of forthcoming domestic and coordinated international regulation.

Findings

Momentum has been building for consolidation, increased oversight, and international coordination of the legal and regulatory framework that governs the financial industry. The report has an unabashedly pro‐regulatory agenda.

Originality/value

The paper provides helpful reference on the current direction of international financial institution regulation

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Corruption, Accountability and Discretion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-556-8

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Book part

Neale R. Chumbler, Smitha Ganashen, Colleen O’Brien Cherry, Dawn Garrett Wright and Jennifer J. Bute

The primary aim of this chapter is to explore stigmatization, stress, and coping among adolescent mothers and to identify positive coping mechanisms that not only resist…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary aim of this chapter is to explore stigmatization, stress, and coping among adolescent mothers and to identify positive coping mechanisms that not only resist stigmatization but also generate positive affect.

Methodology/approach

Fifty-two pregnant and parenting adolescents in an urban county in the Midwestern United States were recruited to participate. A journaling tool was developed and used to allow participants to express their thoughts and concerns in a real-time, reflexive manner. Data were coded at different “nodes” or themes. Concepts, such as stigma, stress, strength, and empowerment were operationalized into key words and “themes” based on previous published literature. Key phrases were used to code the journaling data.

Findings

Adolescent mothers used positive reappraisal of life circumstances to create a positive self-image and resist the stress of stigma and parenting. Overcoming stereotypes and success in parenting were reappraised as “strength,” which allowed the young women to feel empowered in their caregiving role.

Research implications/limitations

The chapter also contributes to the sociological literature on positive coping responses to stigma and stress. Indeed, very few studies have employed the sociological imagination of pregnant and parenting adolescents by describing not only their lives but also seeking their understanding and explaining their lives sociologically. This chapter also has direct implications for several health care providers, including nurses and social workers. For example, nurses and social workers are a vital part of the healthcare team for pregnant and parenting adolescents, and they often serve as the link between the adolescent, her family and significant others, and healthcare and social service agencies.

Originality/value

This chapter described the mechanisms that adolescent mothers use to cope with stress with a focus on how caregiving generates positive affect through the voices of these young mothers themselves. This chapter contributed to the sociological literature on stress and coping. In particular, our findings were also in line with the work of sociologist Antonovsky’s Sense of Coherence concept. SOC is a global measure that indicates the availability of, and willingness to use, adaptive coping resources as a key variable in maintaining health.

Details

Special Social Groups, Social Factors and Disparities in Health and Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-467-9

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