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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Cesar Revoredo-Giha, Faical Akaichi and Philip Leat

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the overall effect of promotions on consumers’ food purchases in Scotland and to consider the implications of the findings for food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the overall effect of promotions on consumers’ food purchases in Scotland and to consider the implications of the findings for food and health policy.

Design/methodology/approach

This is achieved by analysing a representative scanner panel data set for the period 2006-2013. The methodology consists of exploring the impact of promotions on food expenditure and allocation within households’ food purchases, using expenditure regressions and estimations of the linear version the Almost Ideal Demand System.

Findings

The results indicate that whilst promotions have differentiated effects by category, they have similar results by SIMD. The effect of the promotions on the total expenditure is positive for all the quintiles. However, the effect of promotions on each food category is complex because of the cross-effects between categories. As regards the effect of prices, the results provide a picture that seems to indicate that typical economic measures such as specific taxes applied to substances which, e.g., encourage obesity, might have limited impact on the diet given the inelasticity of the demand to changes in prices.

Originality/value

A contribution of this paper has been to focus on the effect of promotions on all the food products consumed by Scottish households, instead of analysing promotional influences on a single or reduced number of products within a category.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Philip Leat, Pamela Marr and Ceri Ritchie

This paper summarises how the Scottish agri‐food industry has been developing farm and quality assurance activities since the early 1990s as it seeks to strengthen its…

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2505

Abstract

This paper summarises how the Scottish agri‐food industry has been developing farm and quality assurance activities since the early 1990s as it seeks to strengthen its competitive position. It also outlines the European system of third party certification for quality assurance schemes. The paper is an introduction to a number of “insights from industry” presented to a conference on “Food Traceability ‐ What? Why? How?” which was held in Edinburgh in February 1998.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Brian Simpson, Adam Muggoch and Philip Leat

This paper outlines the Scotch Quality Beef and Lamb Association (SQBLA) approach to quality assurance and product traceability in the beef and lamb sectors. The schemes…

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927

Abstract

This paper outlines the Scotch Quality Beef and Lamb Association (SQBLA) approach to quality assurance and product traceability in the beef and lamb sectors. The schemes employed provide assurance that set quality standards have been maintained throughout the production and marketing chain from farmer through to retailer and caterer. They were set up in response to a growing awareness, especially by the primary producer, of the need to be able to “guarantee” to the consumer the conditions under which an animal was reared and sold on. The schemes have been extended to include other sectors in the meat supply chain. There are complementary but separate schemes which are run by some processor/retailer partnerships and the paper outlines the operation of one of the most advanced ‐ Scotbeef’s Beeftrack system.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Philip M.K. Leat and Cesar Revoredo-Giha

The purpose of this paper is to analyse different aspects of the concept of value and to provide examples of value creation, identifying the conditions necessary for their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse different aspects of the concept of value and to provide examples of value creation, identifying the conditions necessary for their production within a case study of a Scottish pig supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study involved in-depth, recorded interviews of between 60 and 75 minutes (undertaken between June and August 2010) with seven people involved in the chain and its management.

Findings

Value within the supply chain (i.e. value in exchange) was created through farmers engaging in horizontal and vertical collaboration. For farmers this value arises from efficient pig collection and transport, improved market and price security, and information on improving pig performance. For the processor and retailer, value is generated in terms of improved security of supply of an assured quality and the ability to communicate with their pigmeat supply base. For consumers, value (i.e. value in use) comes through market development associated with a label that communicates clear provenance, high animal welfare practices and consistent product quality.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the research is that the findings are based on the analysis of a particular supply chain. However, the pig cooperative involved currently produces over half of Scotland's weekly pig production.

Practical implications

The lessons of the case study are highly transferable to other agri-food supply chains. It shows producers' successful efforts to reflect attributes that are important for different stakeholders (e.g. retailers, consumers). It also illustrates the importance of shared goals, information exchange and collaborative interaction between supply chain stakeholders in value creation.

Originality /value

The paper's contribution derives from showing the creation of value at different stages of a supply chain.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2013

Philip Leat and Cesar Revoredo‐Giha

The paper examines one of Scotland's major pork supply chains and seeks to identify the key risks and challenges involved in developing a resilient agri‐food supply…

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9331

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examines one of Scotland's major pork supply chains and seeks to identify the key risks and challenges involved in developing a resilient agri‐food supply system, particularly with regard to primary product supply, and to show how risk management and collaboration amongst stakeholders can increase chain resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study involved in‐depth interviews with seven people involved in the chain and its management.

Findings

Reduced supply chain vulnerability to risks arose through horizontal collaboration amongst producers, and vertical collaboration with the processor and retailer. Producers improved market and price security, and pig performance. For the processor and retailer the collaboration generated greater security of supply of an assured quality, improved communication with suppliers, and reduced demand risk as they could assure consumers on quality, animal welfare and product provenance.

Research limitations/implications

The study's findings are based on the analysis of a particular supply chain, but the cooperative concerned currently produces over half of Scotland's weekly pig production.

Practical implications

The findings are highly transferable to other agri‐food supply chains. Producers' successful efforts to deal with different risks and the role of collaboration in enhancing chain resilience are illustrated.

Originality/value

The case is interesting because pigmeat supply profitability has been under constant pressure. It discusses the risks faced by all chain participants and the collective development of a chain which is relatively resilient to variations in price, production and supply.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Philip Leat and Cesar Revoredo‐Giha

The purpose of this paper is to identify the attitudes and experiences of Scottish farmers in marketing their beef and sheep, and the nature of their marketing…

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3293

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the attitudes and experiences of Scottish farmers in marketing their beef and sheep, and the nature of their marketing relationships. As such, it seeks to identify the challenges that the recently revised Forward Strategy for Scottish Agriculture may face with respect to the wider establishment of collaborative supply chains and the strengthening of links between beef and sheep farmers and other parts of the meat supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach involved a postal survey of beef and sheep producers throughout Scotland, with a sample which was representative in terms of regional and farm size distribution. In total 1,778 questionnaires were mailed, with a response rate of 34 per cent (n=611). In addition, interviews were held with major meat processors and retailers in order to provide a “reality check” for the information from the survey.

Findings

The results from the survey show that there are low levels of customer awareness amongst farmers in the red meat chain, and low levels of trust of other chain participants, particularly in relation to price.

Originality/value

The wisdom of developing collaborative supply chains is widely acknowledged throughout the European Union (EU), but such moves need an understanding of the attitudes and circumstances of the various supply chain participants. This paper is of value to practitioners (government, consultants and academia) as it highlights empirical issues that may hamper the development of collaborative supply chains.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Martin Hingley and Adam Lindgreen

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539

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

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27749

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Mehrdokht Pournader, Kristian Rotaru, Andrew Philip Kach and Seyed Hossein Razavi Hajiagha

Based on the emerging view of supply chains as complex adaptive systems, this paper aims to build and test an analytical model for resilience assessment surrounding supply…

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2531

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the emerging view of supply chains as complex adaptive systems, this paper aims to build and test an analytical model for resilience assessment surrounding supply chain risks at the level of the supply chain system and its individual tiers.

Design/methodology/approach

To address the purpose of this study, a multimethod research approach is adopted as follows: first, data envelopment analysis (DEA) modelling and fuzzy set theory are used to build a fuzzy network DEA model to assess risk resilience of the overall supply chains and their individual tiers; next, the proposed model is tested using a survey of 150 middle- and top-level managers representing nine industry sectors in Iran.

Findings

The survey results show a substantial variation in resilience ratings between the overall supply chains characterizing nine industry sectors in Iran and their individual tiers (upstream, downstream and organizational processes). The findings indicate that the system-wide characteristic of resilience of the overall supply chain is not necessarily indicative of the resilience of its individual tiers.

Practical implications

High efficiency scores of a number of tiers forming a supply chain are shown to have only a limited effect on the overall efficiency score of the resulting supply chain. Overall, our research findings confirm the necessity of adopting both the system-wide and tier-specific approach by analysts and decision makers when assessing supply chain resilience. Integrated as part of risk response and mitigation process, the information obtained through such analytical approach ensures timely identification and mitigation of major sources of risk in the supply chains.

Originality/value

Supply chain resilience assessment models rarely consider resilience to risks at the level of individual supply chain tiers, focusing instead on the system-wide characteristics of supply chain resilience. The proposed analytical model allows for the assessment of supply chain resilience among individual tiers for a wide range of supply chain risks categorized as upstream, downstream, organizational, network and external.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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