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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2013

Jeremy Doucet, Xiang Zhang and Philip Irving

This paper aims to present the implementation of a finite element (FE) model used to establish crack and delamination development in a Glare reinforced aluminium plate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the implementation of a finite element (FE) model used to establish crack and delamination development in a Glare reinforced aluminium plate under fatigue loading. This model predicts the behaviour of bonded GLARE straps used as crack retarders for life extension of aircraft structures. In particular, it takes into account the interaction that exists between the substrate crack and the delamination crack at the interface with the reinforcement.

Design/methodology/approach

In this work, a 3D FE model with three-layer continuum shell elements has been developed to calculate changes in substrate stress intensity and in fatigue crack growth (FCG) rate produced by bonded strap reinforcement. Both circular and elliptical strap delamination geometries were incorporated into the model. Calculated stress intensity factors (SIFs) were used together with measured FCG data for substrate material to predict FCG rates for the strapped condition.

Findings

The model predicted a decrease in the SIF and a retardation of FCG rates. The SIF was predicted to vary through the thickness of the substrate due to the phenomenon of secondary bending and also the bridging effect caused by the presence of the strap. The influence of delamination shape and size on substrate crack stress intensity and delamination strain energy release rate has been calculated.

Originality/value

This research aims at developing modelling techniques that could be used when studying larger reinforced structures found in aircraft.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

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Abstract

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International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Book part
Publication date: 15 May 2018

Crystal Abidin

Abstract

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Internet Celebrity: Understanding Fame Online
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-079-6

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2003

Timothy J Dowd

The study of markets encompasses a number of disciplines – including anthropology, economics, history, and sociology – and a larger number of theoretical frameworks (see…

Abstract

The study of markets encompasses a number of disciplines – including anthropology, economics, history, and sociology – and a larger number of theoretical frameworks (see Plattner, 1989; Reddy, 1984; Smelser & Swedberg, 1994). Despite this disciplinary and theoretical diversity, scholarship on markets tends toward either realist or constructionist accounts (Dobbin, 1994; Dowd & Dobbin, forthcoming).1 Realist accounts treat markets as extant arenas that mostly (or should) conform to a singular ideal-type. Realists thus take the existence of markets as given and examine factors that supposedly shape all markets in a similar fashion. When explaining market outcomes, they tout such factors as competition, demand, and technology; moreover, they can treat the impact of these factors as little influenced by context. Constructionist accounts treat markets as emergent arenas that result in a remarkable variety of types. They problematize the existence of markets and examine how contextual factors contribute to this variety. When explaining market outcomes, some show that social relations and/or cultural assumptions found in a particular setting can qualify the impact of competition (Uzzi, 1997), demand (Peiss, 1998), and technology (Fischer, 1992). Constructionists thus stress the contingent, rather than universal, processes that shape markets.

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Comparative Studies of Culture and Power
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-885-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Tanja Mihalic

This is a report on a research project on the development of a model for tourist development of abandoned rural settlements and estates. In the project we used the Visitor…

Abstract

This is a report on a research project on the development of a model for tourist development of abandoned rural settlements and estates. In the project we used the Visitor Friendly Test, known as Kotler's test, taking into consideration basic questions for testing place friendliness suggested by Philip Kotier, Donald Haider and Irving Rein (1993). The Kotier — Haider — Rein test attracted our attention because of a great interest in it among the tourism experts. As the test had never been carried out before, we developed it in such a way that it could be used in practice. The pilot project was carried out on an example of a (lesser developed) tourist community Tr□iè. Test evaluation was made on the basis of experiences gained through development and implementation of the test. This article explains the developmental process of the test, weights, problems and some results. The basic aim of the pilot project was to evaluate the test potential for further use in testing visitor friendliness of places and its usefulness in the tourism development model for abandoned estates where the possibility of measuring the actual customer expectations and perceptions do not yet exist.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2020

Rachel Lopes Morrison and Philip Stahlmann-Brown

to evaluate the experiences of knowledge workers who work in shared workspaces and those who moved from single-cell offices to shared workspaces.

Abstract

Purpose

to evaluate the experiences of knowledge workers who work in shared workspaces and those who moved from single-cell offices to shared workspaces.

Design/methodology/approach

Knowledge workers were surveyed before and after 34% moved from single-cell offices to shared workspaces. The authors exploit this panel design in the analysis.

Findings

Shared offices were rated as providing more distraction, less privacy and worsened indoor environment quality (IEQ) (p < 0.05). Perceptions of collaboration and networking also declined in shared workspaces. Distraction and a lack of privacy were negatively associated with self-reported productivity (p < 0.10). Neither IEQ nor collaboration nor networking was significantly associated with productivity. The perceptions of those who moved to shared workspaces and those who had worked in shared workspaces all along were statistically indistinguishable.

Research limitations/implications

The quasi-experimental control provides evidence that it is the office type, not the experience of moving, that accounts for the evaluative changes. There are limitations inherent in using a self-rating performance measure.

Practical implications

Organisations should be aware that the positive outcomes ascribed to shared spaces may not be apparent and that demands may outweigh benefits.

Originality/value

Knowledge workers are particularly impacted by distraction and interruptions to concentrated work. The quasi-experimental design controlled for the Hawthorne effect, demonstrating that it is the office type, not the move, that accounts for differences in perceptions.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 March 2015

Martin Krygier

This paper seeks to identify in Philip Selznick’s earliest predominantly organizational writings the germs of a strong and unifying temper – or better perhaps, because the…

Abstract

This paper seeks to identify in Philip Selznick’s earliest predominantly organizational writings the germs of a strong and unifying temper – or better perhaps, because the concept plays a significant role in the works, a coherent intellectual and moral character. It infuses Selznick’s work in all the domains he entered. It was evident in his earliest political writings and contributions to organization theory, and remained so in his later contributions to the sociology of law and social and public philosophy.

At one level each of his works had a different subject, at another they all were pondered within a common frame of concerns, intellectual and moral, and approached with a distinctive manner and tone. At a general level, this involved a conception of social science as a “humanist science,” the central concern of which was the fate of values in the world. His specific posture in relation to this subject was underpinned by a commitment to moral realism, or what I call “Hobbesian idealism.”

Selznick began, like Thomas Hobbes as a threat expert, and never lost regard for that expertise. He is alert to fragility, vulnerability, and the need to guard against them. Moreover, his normative reflections are sustained and deepened by his understanding of social processes in general, and of the dangers to which organizations and institutions, but also human personalities and groups, are susceptible. He has a lot to tell us about ways in which those dangers might be avoided. However, Selznick resists stopping where Hobbes stops. Though he stresses the presence and resilience of evil and the need for strenuous efforts to contain it, he holds out for more. Indeed, though recognizing danger might be the beginning of wisdom, it is only half – over time less than half – of the story.

He emphasized the importance of attending both to Hobbesian insights and idealistic ambitions in relation to organizational leadership, to law, to justice, to human achievement of all kinds. To see him, as the earliest critics of his organizational theory did, as a voice of unadulterated melancholy, or as his later ones tended to, as altogether too programmatically sunny and full of hope, is to miss the real core of the intellectual and moral sensibility that pervaded his life of scholarship in the social sciences. The paper concludes by commending this uncommon sensibility, both at the general level of advocacy of “humanist science” and in its specific “Hobbesian idealist” posture.

Details

Institutions and Ideals: Philip Selznick’s Legacy for Organizational Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-726-0

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2014

Deborah Shepherd and Christine Woods

Interest in academic entrepreneurship is gaining attention as pressure on academic institutions to be more entrepreneurial increases. To date, emphasis has been on the…

Abstract

Interest in academic entrepreneurship is gaining attention as pressure on academic institutions to be more entrepreneurial increases. To date, emphasis has been on the transfer and commercialisation of research with little discussion focused on the entrepreneurial potential of university teaching. Drawing on Schumpeter’s theory of entrepreneurship, in particular the combining and recombining of resources and the concept of resistance, we provide an illustrative case study of one entrepreneurial academic venture that emerged from the teaching activities of a university. We examine how this venture, the ICEHOUSE, has evolved and been sustained despite pressure from competing logics from its partnering institutions. We argue that multiple and competing logics by various stakeholder groups led to ‘resistive tension’ which has supported the growth of the organisation.

Details

Academic Entrepreneurship: Creating an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-984-3

Keywords

Abstract

Details

A Developmental and Negotiated Approach to School Self-Evaluation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-704-7

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Book part
Publication date: 13 July 2011

Philip Kotler

The author describes how he entered the marketing field and describes his contributions in four sections: articles written, books published, students nurtured, and…

Abstract

The author describes how he entered the marketing field and describes his contributions in four sections: articles written, books published, students nurtured, and executives consulted and trained. He describes his contributions to the marketing field in nine areas: marketing theory and orientations, improving the role and practice of marketing, analytical marketing, the social and ethical side of marketing, globalization and international marketing competition, marketing in the new economy, creating and managing the product mix, strategic marketing, and broadening the concept and application of marketing.

Details

Review of Marketing Research: Special Issue – Marketing Legends
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-897-8

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