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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Karamarie Fecho, Charity G. Moore, Anne T. Lunney, Peter Rock, Edward A. Norfleet and Philip G. Boysen

This paper aims to determine the one‐year incidence of, and risk factors for, perioperative adverse events during in‐patient and out‐patient anesthesia‐assisted procedures.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the one‐year incidence of, and risk factors for, perioperative adverse events during in‐patient and out‐patient anesthesia‐assisted procedures.

Design/methodology/approach

A quality assurance database was the primary data source. Outcome variables were death and the occurrence of any adverse event. Risk factors were ASA physical status (PS), age, duration and type of anesthesia care, number of operating rooms running, concurrency level and medical staff. Data were stratified by in‐patient or out‐patient, surgical (e.g. thoracotomy) or non‐surgical (e.g. electroconvulsive therapy), and were analyzed using Chi square, Fisher's exact test and generalized estimating equations.

Findings

Of 27,970 procedures, 49.8 percent were out‐patient and greater than 80 percent were surgical. For surgical procedures, adverse event rates were higher for in‐patient than out‐patient procedures (2.11 percent vs. 1.45 percent; p<0.001). For non‐surgical procedures, adverse event rates were similar for in‐patients and out‐patients (0.54 percent vs. 0.36 percent). The types of adverse events differed for in‐patient and out‐patient surgical procedures (p<0.001), but not for non‐surgical procedures. ASA PS, age, duration of anesthesia care, anesthesia type and medical staff assigned to the case were each associated with adverse event rates, but the association depended on the type of procedure.

Practical implications

In‐patient and out‐patient surgical procedures differ in the incidence of perioperative adverse events, and in risk factors, suggesting a need to develop separate monitoring strategies.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to assess perioperative adverse events amongst in‐patient and out‐patient procedures.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Gustav Medberg and Christian Grönroos

The definition of value adopted by the current service perspective on marketing theory is value as value-in-use. Surprisingly, however, little attention has been given to…

Abstract

Purpose

The definition of value adopted by the current service perspective on marketing theory is value as value-in-use. Surprisingly, however, little attention has been given to the question of what constitutes value-in-use for customers in service contexts? Therefore, the aim of this study is to provide an empirical account of value-in-use from service customers' point of view.

Design/methodology/approach

To capture and analyze customers' experiences of value-in-use in the typical service context of retail banking, this study employed a narrative-based critical incident technique (CIT) and a graphical tool called the value chart.

Findings

The study identified seven empirical dimensions of positive and negative value-in-use: solution, attitude, convenience, expertise, speed of service, flexibility and monetary costs. Interestingly, these value-in-use dimensions overlap considerably with previously identified dimensions of service quality.

Research limitations/implications

The concepts of service quality and value-in-use in service contexts seem to represent the same empirical phenomenon despite their different theoretical traditions. Measuring customer-perceived service quality might therefore be a good proxy for assessing value-in-use in service contexts.

Practical implications

As the findings indicate that service quality is the way in which service customers experience value-in-use, service managers are recommended to focus on continuous quality management to facilitate the creation of value-in-use.

Originality/value

This study is the first to explicitly raise the notion that in the minds of service customers, value defined as value-in-use and service quality may represent the same empirical phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Tanja Rabl

The aim of this paper is to challenge the person‐related aspect of the stereotype that older employees are unmotivated. In an overall model, it seeks to examine how age…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to challenge the person‐related aspect of the stereotype that older employees are unmotivated. In an overall model, it seeks to examine how age, perceived age discrimination, and perceived organizational support relate to each other and how they affect the achievement motives' hope of success and fear of failure.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in six large German enterprises using a standardized questionnaire. The sample included 631 older employees aged 50 to 64 and 624 younger employees aged 30 to 40. For the data analysis, PLS structural equation modeling was used.

Findings

The results showed that older employees were more strongly affected by age discrimination than their younger colleagues. Perceived age discrimination, in turn, led to less perceived organizational support and a higher fear of failure. Age, in contrast, was not substantially related to achievement motives. Thus, the stereotype of unmotivated older employees is not justified.

Practical implications

The findings outline the central role of perceived age discrimination. Thus, with an increasingly aging workforce, organizations have to amplify their anti‐discrimination efforts by applying suitable human resource management and leadership practices.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by challenging a stereotype common in Western societies and examining the achievement motives of older employees. Moreover, it tries to shed light on the organization's role regarding the perception of discriminating and non‐supporting environments.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2018

Frederik Plewnia and Edeltraud Guenther

In order to guide sustainability research on the sharing economy, the purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive framework that captures the wide range of…

Abstract

Purpose

In order to guide sustainability research on the sharing economy, the purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive framework that captures the wide range of activities and business models that are considered to be part of the sharing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a systematic literature review and a content analysis, existing typologies are identified and analyzed for their conceptual intersections. Finally, categorizations from 43 documents are integrated into one framework.

Findings

Four main dimensions are identified as being used in different contexts to characterize sharing systems and were combined to form one comprehensive typology: shared good or service, market structure, market orientation, and industry sector.

Originality/value

The proposed typology is able to distinguish sharing activities based on their similarities and differences. Social, economic, and communicational avenues for the term “sharing” are merged into a conceptual foundation of the sharing economy. This enables researchers, practitioners, and policy makers to position their projects in the broad field of sharing. By discussing inherent tensions with regard to sustainability of the sharing economy, the offered categorizations can help to guide future research and policy intervention. Last but not least, professional managers should find valuable ideas for new business models.

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