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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Philip Davis and Fiona Magee

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Zsuzsa Koltay, Ben Trelease and Philip M. Davis

Cornell University's Albert R. Mann Library was featured in a 1994 Library Hi Tech issue as a prototype of the electronic library. Mann Library, the winner of the American…

Abstract

Cornell University's Albert R. Mann Library was featured in a 1994 Library Hi Tech issue as a prototype of the electronic library. Mann Library, the winner of the American Library Association's first Library of the Future award, presented its systematic approach to creating a new digital research library, an approach that employs modern methods rooted in classic principles to form a vibrant, organic whole by integrating the print and the digital library. Mann's approach is based on having a clear understanding of what our mission is and constantly rethinking what we are doing to achieve it. Consequently, a lot has happened at Mann since 1994. This article describes the library's new program of instructional technology support, while a series of short reports focus on some of the other Mann Library projects.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Philip Davis and Fiona Magee

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Philip Davis and Fiona Magee

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Philip Davis and Fiona Magee

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Philip Davis and Fiona Magee

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Philip Davis and Fiona Magee

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Philip Davis and Fiona Magee

Abstract

Details

Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-308-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Eleanor Longden, Philip Davis, Janine Carroll, Josie Billington and Peter Kinderman

Although there is a growing evidence base for the value of psychosocial and arts-based strategies for enhancing well-being amongst adults living with dementia, relatively…

Abstract

Purpose

Although there is a growing evidence base for the value of psychosocial and arts-based strategies for enhancing well-being amongst adults living with dementia, relatively little attention has been paid to literature-based interventions. The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of shared reading (SR) groups, a programme developed and implemented by The Reader Organisation, on quality of life for care home residents with mild/moderate dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 31 individuals were recruited from four care homes, which were randomly assigned to either reading-waiting groups (three months reading, followed by three months no reading) or waiting-reading groups (three months no reading, followed by three months reading). Quality of life was assessed by the DEMQOL-Proxy and psychopathological symptoms were assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire.

Findings

Compared to the waiting condition, the positive effects of SR on quality of life were demonstrated at the commencement of the reading groups and were maintained once the activity ended. Low levels of baseline symptoms prevented analyses on whether the intervention impacted on the clinical signs of dementia.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations included the small sample and lack of control for confounding variables.

Originality/value

The therapeutic potential of reading groups is discussed as a positive and practical intervention for older adults living with dementia.

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