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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Weisheng Chiu, Shiheng Zeng and Philip Shao-Tung Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to explore both the cognitive and affective images and examine the effects of destination image through both aspects on satisfaction levels…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore both the cognitive and affective images and examine the effects of destination image through both aspects on satisfaction levels and tourist loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was conducted using the convenience sampling method. The on-site survey was carried out with Chinese tourists at the popular tourist sites in Seoul City.

Findings

The results showed that the cognitive image had a direct influence on the affective image and confirmed the formation process of the destination image. Both cognitive and affective images had positive influences on satisfaction, and in turn, satisfaction predicted tourist loyalty. Moreover, the relationship between destination image and loyalty revealed that the affective image had a direct influence on tourist loyalty. Although the cognitive image showed no direct linkage to tourist loyalty, the authors found that it had an indirect influence on tourist loyalty through affective image and satisfaction.

Originality/value

The findings of this study provide a better understanding of the process that determines Chinese tourists’ destination choices and loyalty. Moreover, it provides insightful implications for the Korean Government, the Korea Tourism Organization and tourism operators.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2013

Philip Cheng-Fei Tsai and Chih-Ting Shih

A subject of continuous debate in the field of organizational change research and management practices is on whether downsizing strategies result in improved firm…

Abstract

Purpose

A subject of continuous debate in the field of organizational change research and management practices is on whether downsizing strategies result in improved firm performance. The purpose of this paper is to propose and empirically examine dynamic firm capabilities as a major missing mechanism of firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the data of 154 Taiwanese firms that employed an organizational downsizing strategy as the sample for testing the research question.

Findings

The results indicate that a responsible downsizing strategy can result in greater firm performance for the development and enhancement of dynamic firm capabilities.

Originality value

This research introduces dynamic capabilities into the downsizing context, and the empirical results provide new theoretical insight into downsizing and dynamic capabilities research, suggesting that downsizing should be regarded by management as resource management rather than a cost-cutting action.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Philip Cheng, Chong Ju Choi, Stephen Chen, Tarek Ibrahim Eldomiaty and Carla C.J.M. Millar

Suggests another dimension of research in, and application of, knowledge management. This theoretical paper adopts a conceptual, multi‐disciplinary approach. First…

Abstract

Suggests another dimension of research in, and application of, knowledge management. This theoretical paper adopts a conceptual, multi‐disciplinary approach. First, knowledge can be stored and transmitted via institutions. Second, knowledge “subnetworks” or smaller groupings within larger networks can become key repositories of knowledge. The concept of knowledge “subnetworks” needs to be tested against empirical evidence, which should include a cross‐national comparison of knowledge‐based cities. The paper provides some insights to policy makers in designing or developing global cities. It is one of the few papers that discusses the connection between knowledge management and growth of global cities.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Philip Cheng, Carla C.J.M. Millar and Chong Ju Choi

The purpose of this paper is threefold: to contribute to the increasing global debate in organization theory about corporate ethics; to focus on the importance of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: to contribute to the increasing global debate in organization theory about corporate ethics; to focus on the importance of measurement costs and its influence on organizational change in stakeholder systems; and to provide a framework for overcoming the inherent ambiguity and increased measurement costs associated with stakeholder business systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is to analyze the importance of institutional certification and indirect measurement indicators, which are defined as indices to develop a dynamic framework capable of evaluating change in stakeholder business systems.

Findings

The stakeholder business system, a dominant system in continental European countries, as well as various countries in Asia, requires involvement by multiple actors, including financial markets, banks, employees, government.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is necessary to analyze in more depth the way organization value can be measured and how stakeholders can interact with the organizations involved in external certification, in facilitating organizational change. There is also a need to further research the dynamics of the relationship between market, institutions and social structure in organizational change.

Originality/value

A general contribution of the paper is that it illustrates that all industries have “indices”, which are more tacit, implicit than the traditional, transparent market indicators and signals.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Chong Ju Choi, Philip Cheng, Brian Hilton and Edward Russell

To provide a typology of governance mechanisms for the analysis of knowledge exchange.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a typology of governance mechanisms for the analysis of knowledge exchange.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is to integrate various research in the social sciences and knowledge management and to provide a coherent and generic framework for the better understanding of knowledge transfer and exchange.

Findings

The existing literature on knowledge management could benefit more from incorporating more of the research methodologies of social anthropology.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to undertake empirical work and in‐depth case studies of the typology of knowledge exchange frameworks.

Practical implications

The intangibility of knowledge as a resource and asset requires the use of multiple frameworks of knowledge transfer and exchange in organizations as part of a knowledge management strategy.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is to knowledge management researchers on how to broaden the scope of existing knowledge management research through a greater integration with social science methodologies, especially social anthropology.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Belverd E. Needles

This paper provides, first, a historical perspective of accounting research relating to Asian/Pacific countries as seen from the vantage of the leading international…

Abstract

This paper provides, first, a historical perspective of accounting research relating to Asian/Pacific countries as seen from the vantage of the leading international journal in the United States and, second, a bibliographical data base and index of twenty‐six years of articles on this region of the world. It accomplishes the first objective by presenting a tabular profile of research in international accounting as it pertains to countries in the Asian/Pacific Rim region as shown in articles published in the International Journal of Accounting (formerly, the International Journal of Accounting, Education and Research) and related publications which appeared from 1965 to 1990. The articles are classified according to country, research methodology, subject, and five‐year time periods. The paper accomplishes the second objective by providing an annotated bibliography of 125 articles on Asian/Pacific Rim countries and indices by country and methodology, and subject.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

David C. Chou, David C. Yen, Binshan Lin and Philip Hong‐Lam Cheng

Through the tremendous growth of Internet users during the last few years, organizations now realize the potential market of the information highway. However, these…

Abstract

Through the tremendous growth of Internet users during the last few years, organizations now realize the potential market of the information highway. However, these organizations now face the problem of Internet security. The open environment of the Internet contributes greatly to its success, but also plants inherent security problems. Discusses the security frameworks implemented in the cyberspace environment and the current developments and future trends involving this issue.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 99 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2005

Abstract

Details

Corporate Governance: Does Any Size Fit?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-342-6

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Elson Szeto, Theodore Tai Hoi Lee and Philip Hallinger

The purpose of this paper is to provide a research synthesis of substantive findings drawn from studies of educational leadership and management in Hong Kong between 1995…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a research synthesis of substantive findings drawn from studies of educational leadership and management in Hong Kong between 1995 and 2014. The goal of the research synthesis was to identify and elaborate on key trends identified by scholars who studied educational leadership in Hong Kong over the past two decades. The synthesis drew upon on relevant articles published in eight “core international journals” specializing in educational leadership and management.

Design/methodology/approach

The study first identifies a clearly delimited body of relevant literature comprised of empirical, non-empirical and review/synthesis types of studies in a total of 161 published research articles from the eight journals. Information concerning the nature of the studies as well as substantive findings was extracted from each of the articles. The findings were then initially coded in preparation for data analysis. Synthesis of substantive findings was accomplished by cross-article comparative mapping aimed at identifying key themes in the literature. Findings within four of the most robust themes were then synthesized and reported.

Findings

The synthesis highlights the challenges faced in Hong Kong’s efforts to reshape its education in a multi-faceted quest for quality education in the twenty-first century. A variety of inter-related issues emerged as policymakers and education administrators sought to implement a full plate of imported globally recognized education reforms. Analysis of the research from this period yielded four robust themes: “leadership development,” “leadership for learning,” “organizational change,” “multi-level performance focus.” The findings also further highlight the impact of “education policy borrowing” on system-level efforts to revamp the structural conditions in which school leaders operate and reshape managerial, as well as teaching and learning processes in schools.

Research limitations/implications

Although the scope of the sources included in the review are highly representative of the “Hong Kong literature” of the past two decades, the authors note that it was not an “exhaustive” review of all potential sources.

Originality/value

Prior research by Hallinger and Bryant (2013b) had identified Hong Kong as having produced the largest volume of literature in educational leadership and management in Asia. This paper represents the first systematic review of research findings that emerged in the recent educational leadership literature produced in Hong Kong. Therefore, although the authors make no claims of generalizability to other parts of Asia or even to China as a whole, the paper offers insight into how global trends have reshaped the practice of educational leadership in one East Asian society.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Hsi‐An Shih, Yun‐Hwa Chiang and In‐Sook Kim

This study tries to explore through multiple case studies how expatriate performance management is conducted in multinational enterprises (MNEs) of different national origins.

Abstract

Purpose

This study tries to explore through multiple case studies how expatriate performance management is conducted in multinational enterprises (MNEs) of different national origins.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple interviews were conducted with expatriate employees and human resource managers of five MNE subsidiaries operating in the information technology industry, namely, Applied Material (American), Philips (Dutch), Hitachi (Japanese), Samsung (Korean), and Winbond (Taiwan).

Findings

The findings show that all of the firms surveyed use standardized performance forms set by headquarters, which are not tailored to local operating environments. Also, lack of on‐the‐job training for expatriates was found to be prevalent among the five MNE subsidiaries. Divergent practices in goal setting, performance appraisal, and performance‐related pay were largely attributed to the parent company's culture. The nature of the expatriate mission was another reason for different arrangements in expatriate performance management.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to explore expatriate performance management practices of multinational firms. There does not seem to exist a prevalent form of expatriate performance management and such a practice is to some extent more strongly subjected to the influence of the parent company's culture.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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