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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Philip C. Howze and Dana E. Smith

The purpose of this study was to investigate student propensity to learn library use skills independently, as well as to determine whether learning was enhanced through…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate student propensity to learn library use skills independently, as well as to determine whether learning was enhanced through the use of culturally oriented materials. Seventy‐nine participants of color were studied to measure the impact of such variables as independence, culturally centered exercises, and pass rates when using an independent study bibliographic instruction (BI) packet. All packets included the same library use concepts, half expressed as culturally centered, half as classical exercises. Of this number, 40 participants were given multicultural exercises; the other 39 were given classical examples. Within these two groups, 20 from each group were invited to use the services of a peer counselor for help with questions related to the exercises; the others were not offered this option (in order to test for independence). The opportunity to conduct this study resulted from the library's participation in the Summer Enrichment Program (SEP).

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Philip C. Howze

The purpose of this article is to describe a method for activating the contact‐contract‐action model, and to present findings based on its adaptation and integration into…

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to describe a method for activating the contact‐contract‐action model, and to present findings based on its adaptation and integration into a formal library instruction course. Contact‐contract‐action, borrowed from social work practice, is used to promote strategic behavior change or “intervention” resulting from careful assessment of what the user needs (contact), what the user is willing to do to meet his or her information need (contract). After completing the contact and contract phases, the user engages in behavior to actually meet the need (action). Its theoretical bases are client self‐determination and problem solving.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Philip C. Howze and Connie Dalrymple

Encourages the use of Delphi for librarians in search of a research methodology. Describes one of many applications of the method, as an example of how the method can be…

Abstract

Encourages the use of Delphi for librarians in search of a research methodology. Describes one of many applications of the method, as an example of how the method can be employed in a library‐related problem solving process. The Delphi method is an effective means of consensus building, without all the meetings. Includes a description of one such consensus building process, used at an academic library a number of years ago, to determine standardized course content for a formal course in library instruction, a component of the university's general education initiative. A 134‐item checklist of learning objectives was distributed to participants, with the aim of refining the list based on an environmental scan of faculty librarians as experts. High consensus learning objectives were included in the manual, and low consensus objectives were not used. Discusses the viability of applying the Delphi technique to library science and librarianship.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

C. Edward Wall, Timothy W. Cole and Michelle M. Kazmer

During 1994, Pierian Press began experimenting with the integration of the concepts and respective strengths of both Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) and MARC…

Abstract

During 1994, Pierian Press began experimenting with the integration of the concepts and respective strengths of both Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) and MARC. These experiments were driven by pragmatism and self‐interest. Pierian Press publishes classified, analytical bibliographies—classical knowledge constructs—which the press and its authors would like to make available for loading on local library systems so that they can function as “maps” unto that subset of literature the respective bibliographies encompass.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Hannelore B. Rader

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with information literacy including instruction in the use of information resources, research, and computer skills…

Abstract

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with information literacy including instruction in the use of information resources, research, and computer skills related to retrieving, using, and evaluating information. This review, the twenty‐second to be published in Reference Services Review, includes items in English published in 1995. After 21 years, the title of this review of the literature has been changed from “Library Orientation and Instruction” to “Library Instruction and Information Literacy,” to indicate the growing trend of moving to information skills instruction.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Megan Hodge and Nicole Spoor

Although the job market remains extremely competitive for entry‐level librarian positions, only individual, anecdotal stories of what hiring committees are looking for in…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the job market remains extremely competitive for entry‐level librarian positions, only individual, anecdotal stories of what hiring committees are looking for in the candidates they invite to interview currently exist; no formal studies have been conducted since the recession began in early 2008. This survey was created with the aim of allowing those with recent experience on hiring committees to provide advice to those on the market for entry‐level public and academic librarian positions and to answer what are, for many job‐seekers, burning questions.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an exploratory study designed to give librarians with hiring committee experience an opportunity to speak honestly about their preferences, explain how the interview process works at their institutions, and provide advice to job‐seekers.

Findings

The results of this survey provide guidance on what candidates can do to make the most of their abilities, knowledge and skills during the interview process.

Originality/value

Can a new library school graduate compete with those who have so much more experience? What traits are hiring committees looking for in an entry‐level librarian? While the literature does give some indication of best practices for hiring committees in libraries, the researchers of this study wanted to delve into what hiring committees really seek in entry‐level librarians now that the competition is more intense.

Details

New Library World, vol. 113 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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