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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Philip A. Street and June M. Fernie

Very little research is available to help companies which are considering attaining BS 5750. The information that is available tends to be somewhat biased, either coming…

Abstract

Very little research is available to help companies which are considering attaining BS 5750. The information that is available tends to be somewhat biased, either coming from the auditing organization, such as BSI, or a consultancy that is in the business of helping companies to achieve this standard. Offers an analysis of both why companies decide to go for the standard in the first place as well as what they hope to achieve. Examines such thorny issues as audit frequency as well as the need to implement additional supporting programmes in order to cement the standard into the culture of the organization.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Philip A. Street and June M. Fernie

The number of companies becoming registered to BS5750, the UK national standard for quality systems, has grown dramatically, yet little formal research has been undertaken…

Abstract

The number of companies becoming registered to BS5750, the UK national standard for quality systems, has grown dramatically, yet little formal research has been undertaken in the area. The objective of the present study was to determine the view of Scottish manufacturing companies of BS 5750, its benefits and the problem areas associated with it. Questionnaires were sent to 80 companies currently registered to BS 5750 Part 1, 2 or 3. These were randomly selected from the 1990 Scottish Development Agency Register of Quality Assessed Companies, and covered a broad spectrum in terms of size and type of business. A 65 per cent response rate was achieved. Key findings were as follows. Not all of the benefits of BS5750 put forward by the British Standards Institution are being realized in practice, the principal ones are in relation to better company image and increased quality awareness among employees. Sixty‐two per cent of companies believed registration had resulted in significantly higher administration burdens and 70 per cent believed that these would act as a barrier for smaller companies wishing to register. Registration had not removed the need for additional audits by customers: furthermore, 49 per cent of companies were dissatisfied with the external auditing by accredited bodies.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Luchien Karsten, Sjoerd Keulen, Ronald Kroeze and Rik Peters

This paper aims to look at the role of the top and middle management of the Philips organization during the transition from one type of organizational change to another in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to look at the role of the top and middle management of the Philips organization during the transition from one type of organizational change to another in the 1990s and the role the history of the organisation played in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analysis is based on historical records, literature and interviews with former Philips top managers.

Findings

The paper shows that Philips' leaders used different styles of leadership to create a deliberate atmosphere and willingness to change. The final emergent transformation, however, could only sufficiently materialise while it rejuvenated existing management concepts like Quality Management. The success was partly based on the fact that these concepts played a historical role in the Philips organisation.

Originality/value

The paper adds the historical style approach to leadership research and pays attention to the important role of the organization's history during processes of organizational change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Derrick Lee and Philip Pearce

The purpose of this paper is to build on both the theoretical work concerning the co-creation of experiences, and the need for micro-businesses to adopt a

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build on both the theoretical work concerning the co-creation of experiences, and the need for micro-businesses to adopt a consumer-friendly orientation. The researchers examined the compatibility of vendors’ views of their visitors’ perspectives and the visitors’ own assessments of two Hong Kong night markets. Using a large sample survey with over 1,900 tourists and 120 vendors, and examining the data through mean difference testing and factor analysis, the comparability of the views was examined. Key findings were that vendors consistently overestimated the positivity of the visitors’ views. Value for money, trustworthiness of the vendors and product variety were items indicating strong differences where vendors assumed visitors perceived night markets more favorably than did the visitors themselves. The work challenges some assumptions of service design logic and speculates that the durability of night markets is at risk without better vendor understanding of the visitors’ perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The study builds on both the theoretical work concerning the co-creation of experiences, and the need for micro-businesses to adopt a consumer-friendly orientation. The researchers examined the compatibility of vendors’ views of their visitors’ perspectives and the visitors’ own assessments of two Hong Kong night markets. Using a large sample survey with over 1,900 tourists and 120 vendors and examining the data through mean difference testing and factor analysis, the comparability of the views was examined.

Findings

Key findings were that vendors consistently overestimated the positivity of the visitors’ views. Value for money, trustworthiness of the vendors and product variety were items indicating strong differences where vendors assumed visitors perceived night markets more favorably than did the visitors themselves. The work challenges some assumptions of service design logic and speculates that the durability of night markets is at risk without better vendor understanding of the visitors’ perspectives.

Research limitations/implications

For the present work, it would be desirable to ascertain that the figures reported apply to other night markets in Hong Kong and China. Further, the generalizability of the results for different market types, those that offer food or cater to specific interests needs examination. The possibility exists that the general night market will fold as specific tailored options, such as craft, art, flower and homewares themed spaces replace the basic all-purpose format.

Practical implications

The implications from this work are that vendors may have to form new group alliances to understand and then deliver the overall atmosphere, quality of goods and service interactions prized by tourists. Vendors need to sustain their appeal and sales through maintenance of these overall night market characteristics. The vendors may be able to escape individual censure and rejection for a while due to the transient customer base, but broader destination and attraction image concerns are likely to be a longer-term force requiring attention.

Social implications

The implications from this work are that vendors may have to form new group alliances to understand and then deliver the overall atmosphere, quality of goods and service interactions prized by tourists. Vendors need to sustain their appeal and sales through maintenance of these overall night market characteristics. The vendors may be able to escape individual censure and rejection for a while due to the transient customer base, but broader destination and attraction image concerns are likely to be a longer-term force requiring attention.

Originality/value

The broad aim of the study can be identified as the desire to examine the compatibility of vendor and tourists’ views, and the more specific aims of this broad agenda will be articulated after reviewing the core conceptual ideas driving the work.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

George K. Stylios

Examines the tenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects…

Abstract

Examines the tenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Philip G. Skinner, J. Schear and Seth S. Katz

The tragic events of 11 September 2001 have caused people in all walks of life around the world to pause and reflect about what is important to them. With the World Trade…

Abstract

The tragic events of 11 September 2001 have caused people in all walks of life around the world to pause and reflect about what is important to them. With the World Trade Center, one of the icons of global capitalism and New York’s skyline, reduced to a heap of burned and twisted rubble at ‘Ground Zero’ in lower Manhattan, the world of commercial real estate is undergoing a time of reflection in the wake of these unbelievable events. While the catalyst for this time of reflective analysis was at the same time both horrific and compelling, the careful consideration of relevant lease issues and of the need for disaster recovery planning that has resulted will help everyone to be better prepared for unexpected events of any kind in the future. The purpose of this paper is to identify three standard lease provisions that have always been important, but now bear even closer scrutiny in the aftermath of the catastrophic losses of 11 September. These provisions are: Casualty; Interruption or Unavailability of Services; and Insurance. Most form leases contain provisions that address these subjects and raise various issues that are ripe for re‐examination. This paper discusses how such issues might be analysed (or re‐analysed) in the aftermath of this senseless tragedy. Please note that the legal conclusions, practices and norms outlined in this paper are generalised from a United States perspective and, as such, the norms and potential solutions may vary in other countries and on a case‐by‐case basis within a country. Further, the starting point and, often, the ending point in the analysis of any leasing issue is the specific language of the lease, which itself is subject to any applicable laws of the relevant legal jurisdiction. It is important to consider the issues and analysis discussed in this paper in light of the specific market norms and laws of the jurisdiction which are applicable.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Philip G. Skinner, Abe J. Schear and Seth S. Katz

From time to time, clients ask counsel and brokers about the pros and cons of using an assignment versus a sublease to effect a transfer of possession and a transfer of…

Abstract

From time to time, clients ask counsel and brokers about the pros and cons of using an assignment versus a sublease to effect a transfer of possession and a transfer of obligations with respect to leased premises. With about equal frequency, questions come up regarding the differences between assignments and subleases, and ‘whether those differences really make a difference’ after all is said and done. While assignments and subleases are both means to achieve substantially similar ends, they do yield different legal and business results. The purpose of this paper is to explain and discuss some of the similarities and some of the distinctions between assignments and subleases, both from a legal perspective and from business and practical perspectives, and to discuss some of the reasons that the different parties involved in such transactions may prefer, or wish to select one of these transaction forms over the other.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Ann Heylighen, Caroline Van Doren and Peter-Willem Vermeersch

The relationship between the built environment and the human body is rarely considered explicitly in contemporary architecture. In case architects do take the body into…

Abstract

The relationship between the built environment and the human body is rarely considered explicitly in contemporary architecture. In case architects do take the body into account, they tend to derive mathematical proportions or functional dimensions from it, without explicit attention for the bodily experience of a building. In this article, we analyse the built environment in a way less common in architecture, by attending to how a particular person experiences it. Instead of relating the human body to architecture in a mathematical way, we establish a new relationship between architecture and the body—or a body—by demonstrating that our bodies are more involved in the experience of the built environment than we presume. The article focuses on persons with a sensory or physical impairment as they are able to detect building qualities architects may not be attuned to. By accompanying them during a visit to a museum building, we examine how their experiences relate to the architect's intentions. In attending to the bodily experiences of these disabled persons, we provide evidence that architecture is not only seen, but experienced by all senses, and that aesthetics may acquire a broader meaning. Senses can be disconnected or reinforced by nature. Sensory experiences can be consciously or unconsciously eliminated or emphasized by the museum design and use. Architects can have specific intentions in mind, but users (with an impairment) may not experience them. Attending to the experiences of disabled persons, and combining these with the architect's objectives, provides an interesting view of a building. Our analysis does not intend to criticize the one using the other; rather the combination of both views, each present in the building, makes for a richer understanding of what architecture is.

Details

Open House International, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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