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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Mark Stubbs and Phil Range

The need to establish more flexible and adaptable university curricula has been recognised as a strategic priority in recent years and has been supported by a number of…

Abstract

Purpose

The need to establish more flexible and adaptable university curricula has been recognised as a strategic priority in recent years and has been supported by a number of initiatives including the Curriculum Design and Delivery programme funded by the Joint Information System Committee (JISC) in the UK. The challenges of addressing flexibility of curriculum design are both technical and pedagogical. Manchester Metropolitan University has been developing an integrated, institution‐wide virtual learning environment (VLE) since 2006 and this paper seeks to consider the impact of this system.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study is used to illustrate how one institution has developed and integrated a curriculum design system.

Findings

By adopting a streamlined technology strategy the university can provide learners with personalized and flexible access to the university's resources from the range of different devices and contexts (whether mobile, VLE, or social software) in which learners may find themselves as they engage with their education.

Originality/value

A need to establish more flexible and adaptable university curricula is a strategic priority for academic institutions. This case study provides an insight into how one institution is achieving this.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Phil Lambert, Warren Marks, Virginia Elliott and Natalie Johnston-Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study examining the existence and perceived influence of “generational collide” for teachers and leaders across three…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a study examining the existence and perceived influence of “generational collide” for teachers and leaders across three generations – Baby Boomers, Generation X (Gen X) and Generation Y (Gen Y). The study sought to further determine if a teacher’s generation, gender, school level or position influenced their beliefs about generational leadership change.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a cross-sectional survey using an explanatory sequential mixed methods design. A random sample of teachers and leaders from schools in the Sydney metropolitan area participated in a questionnaire (n=244) and a purposive sample of eight participants from each of the three generational groups (n=24) participated in a follow up interview.

Findings

The data revealed that teachers and leaders across all three generations agreed that “generational collide” is real and is currently happening in some schools. Each generation has their own perceptions about the “collide” and often do not recognise that this may differ for other generations. In relation to the key variables, this study demonstrated that primary teachers were significantly more likely to believe that generational leadership change was happening than secondary teachers and that Baby Boomers were significantly more likely to view their staying on past retirement age as positive compared to both Gen X and Gen Y.

Practical implications

The findings from this study have practical implications for system leaders charged with the responsibility of providing the supply of quality leadership for schools through effective succession planning programmes and policies.

Social implications

The findings from this study have social implications for principals’ (and deputy principals’) professional associations who have the responsibility for the personal, professional and career welfare of principals and aspiring principals.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the growing body of evidence around generational collide in schools by providing an Australian perspective on the phenomenon. Moreover, this paper raises important concerns for school leaders and administrators involved in leadership development initiatives at the micro, meso and macro levels. Teachers in each generation have specific beliefs around promotion, career pathways, knowledge transfer and talent retention that need to be recognised and considered in future succession planning.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2022

André Spicer, Pınar Cankurtaran and Michael B. Beverland

Consecration is the process by which producers in creative fields become canonized as “greats.” However, is this the end of the story? Research on consecration focuses on…

Abstract

Consecration is the process by which producers in creative fields become canonized as “greats.” However, is this the end of the story? Research on consecration focuses on the drivers of consecration but pays little attention to the post-consecration period. Furthermore, the research ignores the dynamics of consecration. To address these gaps, we examine the changing fortunes of a consecrated artist – the musician Phil Collins. We identify the ways in which three actors (fans, critics, and peers) assemble for consecration, disassemble for deconsecration, and reassemble for reconsecration. Examining the changing public image and commercial fortunes of Collins as a solo artist between 1980 and 2020, we identify an N-shaped process of rise-fall-rise that we call the Phil Collins Effect. This effect offers a new way of thinking about how cultural producers gain, lose and regain status in their fields.

Details

The Generation, Recognition and Legitimation of Novelty
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-998-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Wim Wester man and Henk von Eije

Liberalisation and deregulation of financial markets, lower currency volatility and the introduction of the euro have reduced transaction and bankruptcy costs for…

1709

Abstract

Liberalisation and deregulation of financial markets, lower currency volatility and the introduction of the euro have reduced transaction and bankruptcy costs for multinationals in Europe. Internal European transfers of cash have become easier and cheaper. This has enabled the centralisation of cash management activities. The centralisation at headquarters of multinational enterprises has also opened the road to financial disintermediation. These trends may have helped to create conglomerate benefits in Europe. The case of the cash management at the Netherlands‐based Royal Philips Electronics is used to illustrate these tendencies.

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

John L. Ward and Christina N. Goletz

Shows how a regional family company threatened by national competition must make changes to its structure and way of doing business or face extinction or sale.

Abstract

Shows how a regional family company threatened by national competition must make changes to its structure and way of doing business or face extinction or sale.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Paul Henry

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of self‐fulfillment motivation in shaping lifestyles. Gewirth's conceptualization is delineated in which self‐fulfillment…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of self‐fulfillment motivation in shaping lifestyles. Gewirth's conceptualization is delineated in which self‐fulfillment occurs when one's deepest aspirations and best capabilities are brought to fruition.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 21 depth interviews were conducted in informants' homes in Sydney, Australia. Informants consisted of males in the mature end of their working life. Age ranged from 49 to 60 years. The interview guide was designed to capture multiple aspects of self‐concept, lifestyle and activities. An interpretive analytic stance was adopted drawing on the transcriptions and in‐home observations to identify systematic patterns.

Findings

Aspects of lifestyle where self‐fulfillment is experienced form focal points for lifestyle adaptation. The experience is energizing and gives meaning to life. However, the choices and direction of fulfillment satisfaction is bounded by specific aspirations and capabilities of the individual. Informants typically found fulfillment from multiples spheres encompassing work and non‐work arenas. Each sphere represents a metaphoric “magnetic point” directed by the match between deepest aspirations and best capabilities of the individual.

Originality/value

The use of self‐fulfillment as a tool for lifestyle analysis is illustrated. The learnings contribute understanding of the motivations behind the choice of specific lifestyle activities that an individual pursues.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Abstract

Relatively limited attention has been paid to the academic needs of students with emotional and behavioral difficulties. Effective interventions are needed to support these students academically, behaviorally, and socially. The purpose of the concurrent studies reported here was to investigate the effectiveness of academic support in writing for fourth- and fifth-grade students (six boys, two girls) and second- and third-grade students (seven boys, one girl) with writing and behavioral difficulties. The Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) approach was implemented as a tier-2 intervention within a comprehensive, integrated three-tiered model of prevention including academic-, behavioral-, and social-skills components. Students learned an on-demand writing strategy for their state writing-competency test. Dependent measures included number of story writing elements, total number of words written, and writing quality. Fourth- and fifth-grade students who completed the intervention improved in total number of story elements. There were mixed results for the total number of words written and writing quality. Second- and third-grade students did not improve their total number of story elements, total words written, or writing quality. Students in both studies scored the intervention favorably, while there were mixed reactions from teachers. Findings, limitations, and suggestions for future research are discussed. Implications for the construct of evidence-based practice (EBP) are also explored, including concerns regarding frequent assessment of writing throughout intervention regardless of stage of instruction in the SRSD model.

Details

Assessment and Intervention
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-829-9

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Phil Clark

I recently developed a spreadsheet template that would summarize the year‐to‐date expenditures and encumbrances of a library and calculate the balance left in the budget…

Abstract

I recently developed a spreadsheet template that would summarize the year‐to‐date expenditures and encumbrances of a library and calculate the balance left in the budget. One of the design objectives was to minimize the number of instructions for clerical workers who would be using the template. Macros, or programmed sequences of key‐strokes, had to be developed—and when using macros, it is best to do a lot of range naming in order to keep things understandable.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Content available

Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Millicent Kennelly

This paper aims to examine participatory sport event organizers’ perspectives on potential connections between their events and tourism and destination marketing outcomes.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine participatory sport event organizers’ perspectives on potential connections between their events and tourism and destination marketing outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study entailed in-depth interviews with participatory sport event organizers in the United Kingdom, coupled with thematic analysis of event websites and social media. The paper uses Chalip’s (2004) model for host community event leveraging to interpret findings.

Findings

Event organizers focused on attracting participants and delivering positive experiences, rather than on stimulating tourism-related outcomes. However, organizers used a range of strategies to attract participants, such as emphasizing attractive and unique location features, which could also serve to entice active sport tourists and promote the event host destination.

Research limitations/implications

Participatory sport event organizers may not prioritize or even sufficiently understand the potential for their events to generate tourism outcomes. For organizers confronted with operating constraints and event delivery challenges, it may be difficult to find the time, and practical ways, to satisfy the needs of tourism stakeholders.

Originality/value

The unique contribution of this paper is its focus on supply-side perspectives on the role of participatory sport events as tourism catalysts, and its examination of the potential for such small-scale events to contribute to sustainable tourism development. This paper also considers the nature of event organizers’ role in implementation of Chalip’s (2004) model for host community event leveraging.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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