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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Linda J. Searby

The purpose of this paper is to define and describe the mentoring mindset in a protégé. The central research question was: What constitutes a mentoring mindset in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define and describe the mentoring mindset in a protégé. The central research question was: What constitutes a mentoring mindset in a protégé who is poised to receive maximum benefits from a mentoring relationship, as described by the mentor?

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological approach was used to conduct this study. Interviews were conducted with veteran school principals who were trained mentors, assigned and paired with newly appointed principals for a year of mentoring. The identification of the phenomenon of the mentoring mindset of the protégé was derived from the mentors’ perspectives of their protégés’ behaviors, dispositions, attitudes, and competencies, as they were conveyed in the research interviews.

Findings

A definition of the protégé's mentoring mindset was created after analysis of the interview data, and indicators of the presence and absence of the mindset were formulated into a Protégé Mentoring Mindset Framework that provides information on protégé competencies. The protégé with a mentoring mindset takes initiative, possesses a learning orientation, has a goal orientation, is relational and reflective. Conversely, the protégé who does not have a mentoring mindset lacks initiative, lacks a learning orientation, a goal orientation, and is not relational or reflective.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of the study is that it only gathered the perceptions of the mentor, but the protégé is the one being described. This, however, is consistent with other studies of protégé competencies. The study was conducted with a specific population (school principals) in a southern state of the USA. Hence, it cannot be assumed to be generalizable to other populations or fields of study. Replication of this research in other settings is suggested, so that the Framework can be further affirmed, disconfirmed, or augmented. Implications of this research could be that the Mentoring Mindset Framework can be used for considering the varied competencies of the protégé, and can be used in both mentor and protégé training.

Originality/value

To this researcher's knowledge, there has not been a Protégé Mentoring Mindset Framework of competencies created in mentoring research.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Vasudev Das

The purpose of this paper is to diagnostically explore the phenomenon of judicial corruption in Nigeria, its causative factors and generate strategies such as sonic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to diagnostically explore the phenomenon of judicial corruption in Nigeria, its causative factors and generate strategies such as sonic therapeutic intervention, among others, that would facilitate an amelioration of the situation. The judiciary which is supposed to be last hope of justice for the Nigerian citizenry has been proven beyond reasonable doubt to have been infected with the virus of corruption, and therefore, an urgent call for action to rectify the situation is imperative.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a qualitative approach rooted in case study tradition.

Findings

The findings showed that power and testosterone, cheating proclivity, family pressure, qualitative passion and ignorance, low self-control, inordinate kleptocratic desire, unrestrained mind and sensory modalities, phenomenological mindset and identity crisis as endogenous contributive factors of judicial corruption in Nigeria.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of the study stemmed from the fact that inasmuch as a perception of corruption and corruption are cultural phenomena, the study results cannot be generalizable.

Practical implications

The practical implication of the research is rooted in the fact that the Nigerian judiciary can gain from the study results and recommendation(s) if implemented without fear or favor for the overall renewal of the judiciary and the nation at large.

Social implications

The study is geared toward ameliorating the Nigerian corrupt judiciary or repositioning the judiciary on its pivotal dignity, and hence, its social implication cannot be overemphasized inasmuch as a positive social change would prevail if the study results and recommendation(s) are aligned with and implemented.

Originality/value

Inquiry on judicial corruption through the lens of qualitative research with Nigeria as a case study is highly understudied, and hence, this research fills the gap in the financial crime literature.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Robert Steven Terrell and Katherine Rosenbusch

Globalization is driving an increased need for leaders who possess global leadership competencies that enable them to lead effectively. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Globalization is driving an increased need for leaders who possess global leadership competencies that enable them to lead effectively. The purpose of this paper is to explore the developmental experiences of global leaders in order to understand the experiences that they report to be developmental, to understand what they learned from their experiences, and to explore how the leaders learned and developed from the experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

For this study, the researcher used Moustakas's phenomenological research method.

Findings

Conclusions indicate that global leaders: develop through first-hand global leadership experience; learn the importance of cultural sensitivity, relationships and networks, and curiosity or desire to learn; require a unique set of global leadership competencies; are driven by curiosity, openness, and a desire to learn; and develop and learn intuitively.

Originality/value

Utilizing a phenomenological research approach yielded new insight, from the perspective of the global leader, into how global leaders learn and develop the knowledge, skills, attitudes, motives or values, and mindsets that are important to their role, and suggested areas for further research. The findings of the study are useful in identifying implications for improving or adding to the methods, approaches, and tools organizations use to develop global leadership competencies.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Bradley Edward Roberts

Phenomenology is widely recognised for its power to generate nuanced understanding of lived experience and human existence. However, phenomenology is often made…

Abstract

Purpose

Phenomenology is widely recognised for its power to generate nuanced understanding of lived experience and human existence. However, phenomenology is often made inaccessible to prospective researchers due to its specialised nomenclature and dense philosophical underpinnings. This paper explores the value of the researcher’s lived experience as a pathway into phenomenological inquiry. The purpose of this paper is to improve the accessibility of phenomenology as a method for qualitative analysis. It achieves this by aligning Husserl’s concept of phenomenological epoche, or bracketing of preconceptions, and the author’s lived experience as a practitioner of kendo, or Japanese fencing.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs the narrative vignette as a means of illuminating the intersections between kendo practice and the application of phenomenological epoche as it applies to the understanding of embodied sensemaking. Reflections on the narrative vignette identified a suite of techniques from kendo practice that were applied to a phenomenological approach for critical incident interviews. These techniques were then applied to 30 critical incident, semi-structured interviews as part of a PhD research project into embodied sensemaking.

Findings

The results from these interviews suggest that the kendo-derived techniques were effective in generating thick narratives from participants during semi-structured interviews. Examination of the results provided insights into the linkage between phenomenology as a continental philosophy and eastern perspectives such as those found within the Zen traditions and other aesthetic practices.

Originality/value

This research suggests that lived experience such as kendo practice can provide a ready-to-hand pathway to phenomenological inquiry.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Gayathri Wijesinghe

This chapter examines how hospitality and tourism researchers can use ‘expressive text’ (or writing) to express the lived quality of an experience in order to ‘show what…

Abstract

This chapter examines how hospitality and tourism researchers can use ‘expressive text’ (or writing) to express the lived quality of an experience in order to ‘show what an experience is really like’ rather than ‘tell what it is like’. Expressive text refers to written language forms such as narrative, poetry and metaphor that can be used as tools in research to vividly represent the meaning and feeling conveyed in an experience. The expressive text-based approach to researching lived experience provides a textual link between experience and its expression. For this reason, it is especially useful when working with lived experience accounts of phenomenological and hermeneutic research.

The expressive text-based approach suggested here is still a relatively under explored arena within hospitality and tourism research. As a relatively under explored arena, the rich insightful knowledge that can be gained from understanding practitioner experience is rarely a central focus of scholarly writings about the workplace in hospitality and tourism contexts. However, in order to be fully appreciated as a discipline in its own right and to advance knowledge of the field, understanding the typical and significant attributes of hospitality and tourism work will be decidedly helpful.

One of the difficulties of working with lived experience accounts is finding a suitable research approach that helps to both retain the lived elements of the experience and ensure the rigour of the inquiry. An expressive text-based methodological framework that has a phenomenological and hermeneutic philosophical underpinning is argued to be suitable for this purpose. Therefore, the focus of this study is to discuss such a methodology and explain the reasons for its content, style and structure in researching lived experience. The approach that is proposed here consists of a five-tiered textually expressive methodology that is employed to contextualise, portray and interpret the lived experience meanings in order to understand the significance of the experience in relation to relevant discourses in hospitality and tourism studies, and to consider implications for policy and professional practice. The guiding questions of the five-tiered framework cover the following issues: (1) What is the context of the lived experience? (2) What is the lived experience of this practice like? (3) What is the meaning of this experience for the practitioner? (4) What is the significance of the experience in contributing to the advancement of knowledge within the field? (5) What are the implications for practice and professional development?

To illustrate uses of this methodology in research, the study here includes an example showing portrayals and interpretations of the typical and significant lived nature of hospitality reception work. This shows and communicates the full meaning of the episode, circumstances or situation. The chapter then concludes with some reflections on benefits as well as tensions in working within an expressive text-based phenomenological and hermeneutic framework.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-742-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Joan F. Marques

To describe ways in which non‐managerial workers could contribute toward establishing spirituality at work.

Abstract

Purpose

To describe ways in which non‐managerial workers could contribute toward establishing spirituality at work.

Design/methodology/approach

The subject scope is spirituality at work. The methods are literature review, and two qualitative (phenomenological) studies. The approach to the topic is defining the phenomenon; examining internal, integrated and external drivers; presentation of the ripple effect.

Findings

Finds that spirituality at work is an inside‐out approach; workers at different levels can help establish spirit at work. Some workplaces are just not susceptible toward a spiritual mindset.

Research limitations/implications

The studies reviewed, although in‐depth, applied to a small sample, which makes generalization riskier. Although interrater reliability was successfully applied in the first phenomenological study, there may be some bias in this approach, because the researcher is the instrument. Suggestions for future research: applying a quantitative study on a broader sample of workers in diverse work environments to detect their opinion about how they could establish spirit at work; elaborating on possible linkages between workers' emotional intelligence and the establishment of spirituality at work.

Practical implications

That workers may reflect on the various aspects of the ripple effect and actually try with enhanced energy to apply this approach.

Originality/value

The viewpoint of spirituality at work, established by workers at non‐managerial levels is new. This paper is valuable for all members of the corporate world, particularly those who consider workplace spirituality only possible with management involvement.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2019

Shahzad Khurram, Anjeela Khurram and Nyela Ashraf

This study aims to adopt the institutional theory perspective to understand how institutional inconsistencies experienced by individuals translate into meaninglessness…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to adopt the institutional theory perspective to understand how institutional inconsistencies experienced by individuals translate into meaninglessness. Moreover, using the constructive development theory, it provides a plausible explanation to the enigma – why do some organizational members develop meaninglessness, while others do not?

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper is based on a critical evaluation of extant literature that helped to develop the empirically testable propositions.

Findings

Grounded in the three types of mindsets as proposed in the constructive development theory, this paper suggests that, for socialized knowers, the degree of meaninglessness is directly related to the extent to which valued others perceive meaninglessness with respect to the institutional prescription creating a certain degree of inconsistency. The self-authoring knowers experience a higher degree of meaninglessness, if the alternative institutional prescriptions challenge the ones attached to their desired identity. While, the self-transforming knowers feel a higher level of meaninglessness, when they realize that the institutional inconsistency is strongly related to the experiences of others impacted by it.

Originality/value

This study adds a significant value to the streams of institutional and constructive development theories literature. It theorizes the variations in organizational members’ feeling of meaninglessness in the face of institutional inconsistencies while considering the shaping effects of field pressure and disposition. These propositions integrate the institutional theory and constructive development theory and present more socially acceptable justifications of the organizational members’ reaction of meaninglessness to institutional inconsistencies.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2018

Emerald Jay D. Ilac

The purpose of this paper is to construct a theorized leadership development model for social enterprises based on the experiences of its current leaders, highlighting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to construct a theorized leadership development model for social enterprises based on the experiences of its current leaders, highlighting what are inherently imperative processes and competencies future leaders should hold.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the epistemological lens of phenomenological analysis, it focuses on the developmental process elements for the social enterprise leader, between the individual and the environment, and the individual and the community. To formulate the model, multiple data collection methods were utilized.

Findings

Analyzing multiple experiences of different social enterprise leaders formed a suggested processual leadership development model, which discovers fundamental elements and skills necessary in their development.

Research limitations/implications

Findings provide a foundational basis in the continued development of social entrepreneurs as rooted in the unique experiences of current social enterprise leaders. A limitation worth noting is the contextual distinctiveness of experiences that may shape the leadership experience.

Practical implications

Findings provide a baseline theorized framework on the critical facets of leadership development for social enterprise. Pragmatically, this functions as a competency framework that can be transformed into concrete learning activities and training sessions.

Originality/value

This paper provides perspective into social enterprise leadership emergence. It underscores the processes involved in comprehending how these leaders evolve through interpreting context, understanding their value and creating awareness with and through others.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2010

Stephen L. Vargo, Robert F. Lusch, Melissa Archpru Akaka and Yi He

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

Alain Guiette and Koen Vandenbempt

This article aims at reframing organizational change from a processual perspective to transcend the polarized tensions between planned and emergent approaches to change…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims at reframing organizational change from a processual perspective to transcend the polarized tensions between planned and emergent approaches to change and to better align with the lived reality of practitioners. It informs the field of learning and development with fresh insights on how to broaden sensemaking repertoires of managers and employees in realizing organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand how change agents conceptualize organizational change at a conceptual level, this article relies on Heidegger’s three modes of being-in-the-world to identify three dominant conceptualizations of organizational change and subsequently theorizes on corresponding phenomenological qualities of sensemaking.

Findings

This article develops a theoretical scaffolding that posits the emergence of organizational change as dialectic process of three different conceptualizations of change, i.e. wayfinding logic, managerialistic logic and reflexive logic, that translate into three different phenomenological qualities of sensemaking, i.e. absorbed sensemaking, detached sensemaking and mindful sensemaking, respectively.

Practical implications

A processual reframing of organizational change informs learning and development scholars and practitioners in at least three ways: raising awareness of and probing underlying managerial assumptions of what change is and how change should be managed, training managers and employees to deal with sensemaking processes to effectively realize organizational change, and actively assist in developing a broader sensemaking repertoire to deal with the equivocality associated organizational change.

Originality/value

This processual reframing contributes to the sensemaking literature on organizational change by reframing change as a dialectic process of different underlying assumptions of change agents, and different qualities of sensemaking of change. It pinpoints to concrete actions that learning and development professionals can initiate to contribute to more effective change management practices.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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