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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Edgar S. Lower

Guanidine stearate will function as a lubricant for melamine/formaldehyde resins (and guanamine/formaldehyde resins), and glyceryl monostearate can improve the mechanical…

Abstract

Guanidine stearate will function as a lubricant for melamine/formaldehyde resins (and guanamine/formaldehyde resins), and glyceryl monostearate can improve the mechanical properties of the former. Laurie acid can be applied to the production of high grade baking enemel resins in combination with melamine. Stearic acid can be used in the manufacture of melamine resins, e.g. by reaction with formaldehyde and butanol, to give resins for lacquers, and to yield moulding resins. Sodium myristate is usable as a chain transfer agent in the emulsion polymerisation of methyl methacrylate. Copolymerisation of methacrolein dibutyrate and methyl methacrylate has given resins that can be moulded or used in varnishes, and reaction products of stearic acid with methacrylic acid and neodymium oxide has given transparent optical resins. Cellulose laurate can produce extensibilities of nitrocellulose of the order of 100%, and cetyl acetate can act similarly in film, having little tendency to yellowing, but it has also little stability to exterior exposure. When ethylene glycol monmethyl ether acetyl ricinoleate is incorporated into nitrocellulose as a plasticizer, it gives films that are clear, tough and flexible. Stearic acid can act as a stabilizer for nitrocellulose. Lauryl phosphate has been applied as a catalyst in the modification of olefinic petroleum results, by reaction with acrylic resins, and distearyl pentaerythritol diphosphite can function as a heat stabilizer in petroleum resins.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1972

The most important component of a coating is the resin: all other components simply modify the resin. Solvents affect the flow, pigments give decorative effects and aid…

Abstract

The most important component of a coating is the resin: all other components simply modify the resin. Solvents affect the flow, pigments give decorative effects and aid economy; the physical and chemical properties of the resins used are the principal differences in various paint systems

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Appala Naidu Uttaravalli and Srikanta Dinda

The purpose of the present study is first to develop a hydroxyl-functionalized ketonic resin for coating applications and to establish a standard characterization…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is first to develop a hydroxyl-functionalized ketonic resin for coating applications and to establish a standard characterization protocol; second, to quantify the effects of various operating parameters on resin properties and to develop mathematical models to predict the product properties; and third, to carry out the compatibility study between the in-house developed resins and commercially available resins.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-polymerization reactions were conducted in a batch reactor. Effects of reaction time, temperature, catalyst concentration and reactor pressure on product properties have been studied. Hydroxyl value, iodine value, solubility, rheology, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were carried out to characterize the product properties. Mark–Houwink correlation was used to predict molecular weight of the resins.

Findings

The study shows that hydroxyl value and softening temperature (ST) of the product increased with the increase of reaction temperature, duration of reaction and alkali concentration. However, the solubility value of the resins decreased with the increase of temperature, time and alkali concentration. Regression models were developed to predict the optimum conditions for obtaining a desired quality of resin. The number-average molecular weight of the developed resins was in the range of 450-1150. The products are thermally stable up to around 200°C, and adequately soluble in many commercial solvents.

Research limitations/implications

The ketonic resin can be used as a substitute of phenolic resins which are prepared from more hazardous materials monomers such as phenolic and aldehyde compounds.

Practical implications

The resin can be used as a substitute of more hazardous materials such as phenolic and aldehyde compounds.

Originality/value

This paper details the synthesis of ketonic resin from cyclohexanone and its compatibility. It also investigates the optimization of operating parameters to obtain a desire product.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Ssuwei Chen, Jeremy Murphy, Jason Herlehy, David L. Bourell and Kristin L. Wood

This paper aims to present a new fabrication method for fuel cell current collectors. Demonstration of its usefulness and discussion of its impact on current collector…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a new fabrication method for fuel cell current collectors. Demonstration of its usefulness and discussion of its impact on current collector design and performance are also given.

Design/methodology/approach

The selective laser sintering (SLS) technique is used to create green parts followed by a high temperature curing process and pressureless infiltration treatment to meet basic part design requirements.

Findings

A material system and process satisfying both manufacturing constraints and product property requirements can be used for fabrication of current collectors via SLS. Relative particle size and composition of the constituents play an important role in successful manufacture of the plates. Strategies to improve electrical conductivity are also discussed.

Originality/value

A new manufacturing method has been developed for the construction of fuel cell current collectors that could generate opportunities for performance enhancement and fuel cell application by eliminating the constraints imposed by traditional fabrication processes.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1956

Bernard Mohr

This article deals with corrosion‐resisting floor surfaces, provided over suitable load‐bearing bases, to withstand the corrosive action of chemicals to which they will be…

Abstract

This article deals with corrosion‐resisting floor surfaces, provided over suitable load‐bearing bases, to withstand the corrosive action of chemicals to which they will be subjected. When considering suitable acid‐ and chemical‐resistant floors, apart from corrosion, the type of traffic, maintenance, ease of renewal, amount of solution present on the floor and personnel reactions should be taken into account also. When designing new floors, attention must be paid to possible vibrations resulting from traffic or nearby machinery, possible settling of the floor, and the live and dead loads it will be subject to.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 3 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Kaushik Alayavalli and David L. Bourell

The purpose of this paper is to produce electrically conductive, fluid impermeable graphite bipolar plates for a direct methanol fuel cell, using indirect selective laser…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to produce electrically conductive, fluid impermeable graphite bipolar plates for a direct methanol fuel cell, using indirect selective laser sintering (SLS) and suitable post processing techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

Bipolar plates are made by the indirect SLS of graphite powder and phenolic resin mixture. The phenolic resin binder is then burnt off at a high temperature in a vacuum furnace to produce a 100 per cent carbon part. This brown part is then infiltrated using a low‐viscosity (∼5‐10  cps) cyanoacrylate to seal up the open pores, rendering the plates fluid impermeable.

Findings

It has been found that the electrical conductivity increases significantly (> 220 S/cm) with a corresponding increase in pyrolyzing temperature which correlates well with literature on the carbonization of phenol formaldehyde resins. The cyanoacrylate infiltrated parts tested under fluid pressure demonstrated no leakage through the plate, indicating full closure of open porosity.

Originality/value

This work demonstrates the capability of the SLS process to produce working bipolar plates with complex flow field designs that can be tested to verify its efficacy in a working fuel cell, thereby saving time and cost in machining natural graphite.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1986

Polyvinyl acetal resins have grown in use steadily over the past two decades. Pioneered by Monsanto under the trademarks Butvar® (polyvinyl butyral) and Formvar…

Abstract

Polyvinyl acetal resins have grown in use steadily over the past two decades. Pioneered by Monsanto under the trademarks Butvar® (polyvinyl butyral) and Formvar® (polyvinyl formal), the resins have a combination of properties making them ideal for applications in many different fields.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 15 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2018

Harun Yanar, Hasan Huseyin Ayar, Muhammet Demirtas and Gencaga Purcek

This paper aims to investigate the effect of straight phenolic resin content on the fade behavior, frictions and wear characteristics of pre-determined brake pad composite…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of straight phenolic resin content on the fade behavior, frictions and wear characteristics of pre-determined brake pad composite matrix having specific amount of barite (BaSO4), rock wool, Kevlar, graphite and magnetite.

Design/methodology/approach

Different amount of resin ranging between 16 and 20 wt. per cent were added by changing only the filler (barite) content of composite matrix. Subsequently, friction and wear behavior of the composite samples were analyzed using a special pin-on-disc type test system developed for brake pad sample. The worn surfaces were investigated by SEM and three-dimensional (3D) surface profilometer.

Findings

The average coefficient of friction (CoF) of composite samples and temperature of the disc surface showed a linear increase with decreasing the resin content. The sample having 20 wt. per cent resin showed the minimum wear rate with smooth worn surface. But the amount of fade is quite high in that sample. Decreasing resin content decreased the fade formation, and the composite with 16 per cent resin brought about the minimum fade formation. As the fade formation is unwanted in brake pad applications, the composite with 16 wt. per cent resin was proposed as the most appropriate one considering the performance parameters related to friction and wear.

Originality/value

This paper optimizes the resin content of composite brake pad materials to achieve the best combination of its tribo-performance and mechanical properties and provides valuable information for scientists and engineers working in that area.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 72 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1947

G. Fitzgerald‐Lee

ALL ‘plastics’ are generally divided into two groups: the ‘thermoplastics’, which are formed by heating, can be re‐heated after forming, and re‐formed almost ad lib, such…

Abstract

ALL ‘plastics’ are generally divided into two groups: the ‘thermoplastics’, which are formed by heating, can be re‐heated after forming, and re‐formed almost ad lib, such as celluloid, xylonite, rhodoid, cellophane, and perspex; and the ‘thermosetting plastics’, which are also formed by heating but cannot yet be re‐formed by the application of heat or any other means, probably the best‐known example of which is the thermosetting variety of bakelite.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

S.M. El‐Sawy, M.A. Abou‐Khalil, N.A. Ghanem and A.A. Ismail

Summary The present work aims to study the inhibition mechanism of barium metaborate pigments. Six grades of barium metaborate pigments were prepared in the Laboratory of…

Abstract

Summary The present work aims to study the inhibition mechanism of barium metaborate pigments. Six grades of barium metaborate pigments were prepared in the Laboratory of Polymers and Pigments, National Research Centre of Cairo, Egypt. The methods of preparation modification and evaluation is the main subject of a recent article. The pigments were incorporated, with other ingredients, into formulations, and the electrode potential, electrical resistance, water uptake and weight loss measurements were taken. Formulations based on a commercial pigment supplied by an international company were prepared and used as blanks.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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