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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2019

Barbara Czarniawska

The purpose of this paper is to convince the readers that more complex images of working women are needed, and that fiction may provide them.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to convince the readers that more complex images of working women are needed, and that fiction may provide them.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, text analysis is done using a version of close reading.

Findings

Both media and research tend to simplify the images of working women, either in positive or negative way. Reality and some of its fictive representations offer more nuanced examples.

Research limitations/implications

Fiction can be treated as field material.

Practical implications

Women should dare more at workplaces.

Social implications

Researchers should join fiction writers in convincing society of the crucial role women play in contemporary organizations.

Originality/value

This paper belongs to the growing tradition of transdisciplinary organization studies.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Ona Vileikis, Giorgia Cesaro, Mario Santana Quintero, Koenraad van Balen, Anna Paolini and Azadeh Vafadari

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the application of documentation and recording techniques for World Heritage conservation using the case studies of the Petra

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the application of documentation and recording techniques for World Heritage conservation using the case studies of the Petra Archeological Park (PAP) in Jordan and the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Information System (CHRIS) in Central Asia. In the PAP case study, these techniques could aid in the assessment of risks faced by World Heritage properties and threats to the integrity of the Outstanding Universal Values (OUV). With respect to the Silk Roads CHRIS case study the Geospatial Content Management System (Geo‐CMS) proposed aims to improve information management and collaboration among all stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrated surveying techniques and information management systems together with active stakeholder participation can be used as conservation and management tools. In the case of PAP, using a systematic documentation tool (MEGA‐J) to conduct site condition and risk assessment of cultural heritage and combining photographs, maps and GPS measurements within a GIS platform allows for identifying the location and intensity of risks, and the degree of vulnerability within the PAP boundaries and buffer zone. In the Silk Roads CHRIS project the Geo‐CMS brings together data from different fields, e.g. geography, geology, history, conservation, to allow for a holistic approach towards documentation, protection and management of a number of diverse sites to be combined in serial transnational World Heritage.

Findings

The study provides insight into how digital technologies can aid in heritage documentation and conservation, including stakeholder involvement and training. Moreover, by means of the two case studies it can be shown that a combination of digital technologies allows for an efficient mapping of buffer zones and risks and how a Geo‐CMS can form a common platform to manage large quantities of information of different origin and make it accessible to stakeholders in transnational projects.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the use of digital technology and the participation of stakeholders in heritage conservation and documentation when dealing with complex World Heritage properties, e.g. serial transnational and archaeological ensembles at high risk.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2014

Toong Tjiek Liauw (Aditya Nugraha)

A community outreach program called Surabaya Memory (SM) initiated by Petra Christian University’s Library in Indonesia is described in this chapter. It is dedicated to…

Abstract

A community outreach program called Surabaya Memory (SM) initiated by Petra Christian University’s Library in Indonesia is described in this chapter. It is dedicated to the preservation of Surabaya city’s historical and cultural heritage, and provides a case study of academic library leadership both in its campus setting and in society in general. The initiative started in 2001 as a heritage project dedicated to preserving resources digitally, but since then evolved into much broader initiatives involving various community outreach programs. These programs and activities have been held in the city’s malls in an effort to reach everyone, not just the learned and cultured groups of society. In organizing all those programs and activities, the Library found itself assuming expanding roles and functions. It has also found itself exercising leadership roles in facilitating various university academic departments and administrative units to reach out to the community at large. SM also served as a forum wherein academic departments could showcase the Surabaya-related work of faculties and students to the general public. In some cases SM’s programs and activities which could be integrated into academic courses in several academic departments. The chapter discusses a model for academic libraries to assume leadership roles on campus, and for redefining their roles and activities well beyond their campuses. Such newly redefined roles will, in the end, raise not only the public profile of academic libraries on campus but also of the entire university.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-469-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2018

Serli Wijaya, Wahyuniwati Wahyudi, Claudia Benita Kusuma and Evelyn Sugianto

This study focuses on the Indonesian seniors’ motivation in terms of travelling to a destination abroad. Using the push–pull motivation constructs and recognising the role…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study focuses on the Indonesian seniors’ motivation in terms of travelling to a destination abroad. Using the push–pull motivation constructs and recognising the role of culture in influencing travel behaviour, the purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of the underlying factors that explain why Indonesian seniors travel to and select an international destination.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire-based survey was completed to collect data from 246 Indonesian seniors aged 55 years and over who had travelled overseas. Factor analysis was applied to reduce the total of 34 push and pull travel motivation items into new underlying factors. Informal interviews were also undertaken to support the analysis.

Findings

Personal development, relaxation and relationship enhancement appeared to be the three factors that internally pushed the seniors to travel abroad. Meanwhile, facilities and hygiene, destination familiarity, value for money and destination proximity, local attractions and supporting travel facilities were found to be the factors that pulled the seniors to select an international destination they would like to visit. The emergence of relationship enhancement, destination familiarity and value for money and destination proximity factors were evident that the unique aspect of Indonesian cultural values could shape the motivation of Indonesian seniors to go travelling.

Originality/value

Although studies on senior travel motivation are abundant, empirical research studies that focus on examining Indonesian senior travel behaviour are still rare. This study therefore serves as one of the first attempts to examine the behaviour of Indonesian seniors when undertaking outbound travel trip. Based on the study’s findings, practical recommendations were offered to tourism stakeholders involved in tailoring a specific tourism product and services for the Indonesian senior tourist market.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

Liauw Toong Tjiek

The purpose of this paper is to introduce Desa Informasi (Information Village), an institutional repository project carried out by Petra Christian University Library in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce Desa Informasi (Information Village), an institutional repository project carried out by Petra Christian University Library in Surabaya, Indonesia, and discuss its potential for enabling academic libraries to remain relevant in the digital era.

Design/methodology/approach

Definitions of an institutional repository are discussed and a short description of Desa Informasi and its digital contents are given. The potential of the digital contents in the repository as a “new species” of resource, as well as for a base for offering new services by academic libraries, is discussed. Lastly, the possibility of an institutional repository project being used by academic libraries to reach out to society is described, with relevant examples from the Desa Informasi project.

Findings

An institutional repository project can result in “new” resources and services for academic libraries, and has the potential to reach out to communities outside their traditional user base.

Originality/value

This paper identifies opportunities for academic libraries to remain relevant in the digital era.

Details

Program, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 November 2011

Geoff Morgan

This paper aims to show the particular difference Independent Mental Capacity Advocates (IMCA) can make towards specific decisions which some acquired brain injury…

257

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show the particular difference Independent Mental Capacity Advocates (IMCA) can make towards specific decisions which some acquired brain injury clients, who are eligible for the IMCA service, experience.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study is highlighted in which the role of the IMCA is described against the background of a selective literature review on the history of advocacy in relation to its emergence as a profession. This analysis references issues of spirituality and culture.

Findings

Themes raised in the case are discussed with reference to ongoing research and these are related to the best interests of clients, and to reflexivity as a basis for the professionalisation of advocacy.

Research limitations/implications

IMCA practitioners are instructed in well‐defined “best interests” situations, where an individual has no capacity, support or representation, or requires safeguarding measures in relation to certain decisions. In these cases, social, cultural, emotional, religious or spiritual factors can contribute to the decisions which need to be made.

Practical implications

The emerging role of the IMCA in the “best interests” process is outlined, including how health and social care professionals, or decision‐makers, may relate to, benefit from, or respond to challenges by the IMCA in supporting clients in decisions made on their behalf.

Originality/value

Healthcare professionals and those advocating, including IMCA, could more intentionally weigh up the values and beliefs of clients using, for example, the “best interests checklist” or by referring to “spiritual assessment”, as used increasingly by mental health ward staff and chaplains.

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Aldilla Dharmasasmita, Helen Puntha and Petra Molthan-Hill

The purpose of this paper is to present a food-themed project at Nottingham Trent University, the Sustainability in Practice (SiP) Certificate, which has adopted a…

583

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a food-themed project at Nottingham Trent University, the Sustainability in Practice (SiP) Certificate, which has adopted a supra-disciplinary approach involving a collaborative enquiry into food sustainability through a flexible online course open to all staff and students.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper will describe the pedagogical approach of the certificate’s online and offline components, the various activities undertaken by participants and the digital tools used to encourage collaboration and skills development. Reflection on participant feedback is incorporated, and special attention is given to how the design of SiP equips students with the skills needed to solve sustainable challenges.

Findings

Feedback from previous participants indicated that despite high engagement in the SiP online discussion forums, there was a desire to go beyond theoretical discussion; students wanted to get actively involved in some practical challenges. “Sustainability Challenge Days” are therefore now offered and comprise in-person discussion, volunteering and collaborative group learning to complement the online course. This practice element as well as the crowdsourcing of sustainable solutions within SiP are described in detail in this paper.

Research limitations/implications

Although estimately 1,000 students have taken the SiP to date, SiP Challenge Day was only piloted this year, following recommendations by student focus groups in 2014 and 2015. Focus groups have not yet been undertaken for the 2015/2016 cohort. The feedback included in this paper is based only on students who participated in the Challenge Days. Analysis of the feedback forms indicates that the 2015/2016 SiP Challenge Days have constituted a promising pilot project, and, therefore, organisation of Challenge Days for the next academic year is already in progress, with two additional themes already in placed.

Practical implications

The SiP Challenge Day events have provided the opportunities for students from across all disciplines to discuss, collaborate and thus find solutions to a contemporary sustainability topic: food scarcity and accessibility. Hence, it has facilitated inter and supradisciplinary learning, a skill that is seldom available in a conventional lecture and/or seminar teaching environment.

Social implications

Activities in the SiP Challenge Day events included group discussions, team working and presentations. Some of the feedback received from students have included how they have enjoyed exchanging ideas from colleagues in different schools and culture, as the exchange have had them to consider different opinions and perspectives from other disciplines, culturally.

Originality/value

While a focus on sustainability within higher education curriculum is on the increase, it is still usual for universities to adopt a mono-disciplinary approach to addressing sustainability. This paper illustrates how using the digital world, higher education institutions can adopt a supra-disciplinary approach to facilitate students in addressing real-world sustainability problems. Additionally, how practical sessions can complement students’ digital learning in sustainability is also included in this paper.

Article
Publication date: 19 January 2022

Josua Tarigan, Jordan Cahya, Albert Valentine, Saarce Hatane and Ferry Jie

The study of monetary and non-monetary rewards from the human resource management (HRM) perspective has rarely been analyzed so far. There has been extensive study on HRM…

Abstract

Purpose

The study of monetary and non-monetary rewards from the human resource management (HRM) perspective has rarely been analyzed so far. There has been extensive study on HRM, yet only a few studies explicitly discuss the correlation between the adoption of a total reward system (TRS) and employee-related outcomes. This paper aims to analyze this important issue to provide inputs for organizations to design compensation strategies that will impact on company’s financial performance with employee productivity and job satisfaction as mediating variables specifically for Generation Z.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted on 40 companies operating in the service sector in Indonesia. The authors captured the overall TRS result on three outcome variables (i.e. job satisfaction, employee productivity and financial performance). Furthermore, the authors examine the impact of TRS (base pay, training and development and positive work environment) on Generation Z workers. Structural equation modeling analysis was conducted on 40 Indonesian, service industry, listed firms with an average of 6 representatives per firm.

Findings

The results validate that the adoption of a TRS exerts a positive influence on the aforementioned outcomes. However, the interesting fact about the finding is that Generation Z cannot be easily satisfied with only monetary incentives; their preference has shifted from monetary concerns to self-capability.

Practical implications

The empirical result suggests that TRS serves as a tool in encouraging employees and boosting productivity. Accordingly, firms should incorporate TRS practices to enhance job satisfaction and productivity, as well as sustain the relationship with stakeholders. Subsequently, management should also be concerned with maintaining good employee productivity to improve a company’s financial performance by supervising and monitoring company operations, as well as ensuring the fulfillment of the stakeholder’s interests.

Originality/value

This paper provides original insights into the complex relationship between TRS and the aforementioned outcomes, such as job satisfaction, employee productivity and financial performance.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

Tala Abuhussein, Husam Barham and Saheer Al-Jaghoub

The ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in sudden changes in the macro environment and market behaviour, making most enterprises urgently…

Abstract

Purpose

The ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in sudden changes in the macro environment and market behaviour, making most enterprises urgently reconfigure their business models to cope with changes following the COVID-19 outbreak. This paper aims to present empirical data on the effects of the COVID-19 crisis on small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), highlighting the initial conclusions regarding their crisis management. It presents factual data on how SMEs in Jordan can use entrepreneurship to combat uncertainty and promote new opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involves an exploratory qualitative research design, drawing from 32 semi-structured interviews of key informants from Jordanian SMEs in different stages of the crisis. The different coping strategies of the SMEs and their effectiveness in the first six months of the pandemic are then compared.

Findings

The findings show how Jordanian SMEs have adapted to cope with the changes in the business environment because of COVID-19. These strategies include modifying their operations that is moving from an ordinary business model to more tentative digitalisation, improving internal communication and restructuring ad hoc organisational culture.

Originality/value

The study presents important and timely implications for managers of Jordanian SMEs and policymakers by increasing the sensitisation and awareness of SMEs’ coping mechanisms. It is the first study in management that empirically analyses the impact of COVID-19 on Jordanian SMEs.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Hanna Astner and Johan Gaddefors

The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of identities in entrepreneurial processes during the development of a new market. Two research questions are used: How…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of identities in entrepreneurial processes during the development of a new market. Two research questions are used: How do the founder’s identity, corporate identity and market identity interact as a new market is developing, and what are the functions of identity in the entrepreneurial process?

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative research is grounded in a study of multiple cases, from which five Swedish start-ups have been selected. Interviews were conducted with the founders at several points in time and accompanied by observations of websites, media performance, policy documents and commercial material. Analysis was conducted in an iterative process between empirics and theory.

Findings

The findings show how identities develop in entrepreneurs, firms and the market and how the interactions between these three levels of identity affect the development of each. The authors recognize and discuss three functions of identity: a constructing function, in which identity is used to create a new firm and market; a guiding function, which navigates between identities by imposing identity work on founders, firms and markets; and a configuring function, which takes part in shaping contexts.

Research limitations/implications

This paper opens a space for future research on identities to advance understandings of how new firms and markets are developed. Investigating identity shows the importance of context to entrepreneurial processes. This points towards a need for researching different contexts, but also to the potential limited value of this study.

Practical implications

The paper offers guidance to founders and managers in understanding and navigating different identities. Founders and managers are provided with a set of critical questions, which aim to assist when managing identity-related concerns.

Originality/value

There is a vast amount of literature on the development of companies and markets, yet start-ups in new markets operate in different contexts and face different challenges that we know less about. This paper targets the latter and proposes identity as a useful lens for understanding the dynamics between entrepreneurs, start-ups and the new market.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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