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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Kogila Vani Annammala, Anand Nainar, Abdul Rahim Mohd Yusoff, Zulkifli Yusop, Kawi Bidin, Rory Peter Dominic Walsh, William H. Blake, Faizuan Abdullah, Dhinesh Sugumaran and Khuneswari Gopal Pillay

Although there have been extensive studies on the hydrological and erosional impacts of logging, relatively little is known about the impacts of conversion into…

Abstract

Although there have been extensive studies on the hydrological and erosional impacts of logging, relatively little is known about the impacts of conversion into agricultural plantation (namely rubber and oil palm). Furthermore, studies on morphological impacts, sediment-bound chemistry and forensic attribution of deposited sediment to their respective sources are scarcer. This chapter introduces the potential for using the multi-proxy sediment fingerprinting technique in this context. Featuring pilot projects in two major flood-prone river systems in Malaysia, the studies explore application of geochemistry-based sediment source ascription. The geochemical signatures of sediment mixtures on floodplains were compared to sediments from upstream source tributaries. The tributaries were hypothesised to have different geochemical signatures in response to dominant land management. The first case study took place in the Segama River system (4,023 km2) of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo where a mixture of primary forest, logged-forests and oil palm plantations were predominant. The second case study was in the Kelantan River Basin (13,100 km2) with two major tributaries (Galas River and Lebir River) where logged-forests and rubber and oil palm plantations are dominant land-uses. Both case studies demonstrated the applicability of this method in ascribing floodplain deposited sediment to their respective upstream sources. Preliminary results showed that trace elements associated with fertilisers (e.g. copper and vanadium) contribute to agricultural catchment signatures. Alkaline and alkaline-earth elements were linked to recently established oil palm plantations due to soil turnover. Mixing model outputs showed that contributions from smaller, more severely disturbed catchment are higher than those from larger but milder disturbed catchments. This method capitalises on flood events to counter its adverse impacts by identifying high-priority sediment source areas for efficient and effective management.

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Improving Flood Management, Prediction and Monitoring
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-552-4

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

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Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Rebecca Strating

This chapter examines narratives and representations of rural Australia deployed by political actors. At both federal and state levels in Australia, political parties tend…

Abstract

This chapter examines narratives and representations of rural Australia deployed by political actors. At both federal and state levels in Australia, political parties tend to focus their attention on metropolitan electorates in their public discussions, particularly during election campaigns. This has led to accusations from minor parties and independents that rural areas are ignored by governments based in capital cities. The Nationals, for example, presents itself as the party whose primary motivation is to protect the interests of rural voters. Rural sites are political spaces shaped by particular types of narrative and rhetoric. Engaging with how the ‘rural’ is represented through rhetoric and image is useful for understanding how crime is positioned. This chapter uses rhetorical political analysis and representation to understand how political ideas about rurality are expressed through language and imagery. The political context outlined in this chapter is one factor that affects the nature and complexities of rural crime and responses to it. Rural Australia is at its own political crossroad, reflected in the emergence of competing narratives for the bush, defined here as a contest between ‘rural centrism’ and ‘rural populism’.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Christine Ryan and Peter Walsh

There is increasing pressure being placed on government agencies both in Australia and internationally to act in a more collaborative, integrated manner. Community and…

Abstract

There is increasing pressure being placed on government agencies both in Australia and internationally to act in a more collaborative, integrated manner. Community and welfare programs are being conducted in new “shared” or “whole‐of‐government” ways, which pose a challenge to traditional models of public sector reporting. Existing accountability mechanisms are designed for vertical accountability relationships, and these are inadequate for horizontal or “networked” accountability across government agencies. This paper uses the case of the Community Renewal Program based in the Queensland state government department to illustrate the problems which arise when reporting on “shared” programs. The paper offers a different approach to improve reporting and accountability for shared programs.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2020

Irfan Ullah, Wiqar Ahmad and Arshad Ali

This paper aims to identify the key patronage factors that encouraged the public for investment in the Modaraba scam – a Ponzi scheme perpetrated in Pakistan with a whim…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the key patronage factors that encouraged the public for investment in the Modaraba scam – a Ponzi scheme perpetrated in Pakistan with a whim of Sharīʿah-compliant business and intermediation of religious clerics.

Design/methodology/approach

In a qualitative research, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the investors of the scam followed by thematic analysis to conclude on the subject matter.

Findings

The results reveal numerous stimuli, thematically categorized as the monetary stimulus, religiosity stimulus and lubricants, which mobilized investment towards the scam. In general, a lucrative rate of return on investment and personality of the agents, being religious clerics, were the two prominent reasons, which convinced unanimously all investors. In particular, the religiosity stimulus (agents’ personality and Sharīʿah-compliant business) was a novel and eye-catching slogan of the scheme.

Originality/value

Keeping in view the amount of scam and number of victims, this research is a robust attempt to conclude on the determinants of investment decision in the Modaraba scam.

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Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2007

Alan Barcan

The student revolt of 1967 to 1974, which finally expired about 1978, retains its fascination and much of its significance in the twenty‐first century. But the seven or so…

Abstract

The student revolt of 1967 to 1974, which finally expired about 1978, retains its fascination and much of its significance in the twenty‐first century. But the seven or so years which preceded it are often passed over as simply a precursor, the incubation of a subsequent explosion; they deserve a higher status. The concentration of interest on the late 1960s and early 1970s arises from the driving role of students in the cultural revolution whose traumatic impact still echoes with us. As late as 2005 some commentators saw federal legislation introducing Voluntary Student Unionism as the culmination of struggles in the 1970s when Deputy Prime Minister Costello and Health Minister Abbott battled their radical enemies. Interest in these turbulent years at a popular, non‐academic level has produced a succession of nostalgic reminiscences. In the Sydney Morning Herald’s ‘Good Weekend’ for 13 December 2003 Mark Dapin pondered whether the Melbourne Maoists had changed their world views (‘Living by the Little Red book’.) In the Sydney University Gazette of October 1995 Andrew West asserted that the campus radicals of the 1960s and ‘70s had remained true to their basic beliefs (‘Not finished fighting’.) Some years later, in April 2003, the editor of that journal invited me to discuss ‘Where have all the rebels gone?’ My answer treated this as a twofold question: What has happened to the former rebels? Why have the students of today abandoned radicalism?

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History of Education Review, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1968

Muriel M. Green

VIRGINIA WOOLF'S FIRST TWO NOVELS (The Voyage Out and Night and Day) are fairly conventional in form, the characters revealing themselves by their conversation and action…

Abstract

VIRGINIA WOOLF'S FIRST TWO NOVELS (The Voyage Out and Night and Day) are fairly conventional in form, the characters revealing themselves by their conversation and action. Even her third novel (Jacob's Room) only breaks two conventions—it eliminates plot, and it abolishes the omniscient author, thus Jacob is seen through the eyes of the other characters. This, however, was not an innovation.

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Library Review, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Roger J. Callan and Ruth Fearon

Town house hotels are a small but expanding segment of the UK hotel sector. Little has been published about them and the article sets out to provide a background and some…

Abstract

Town house hotels are a small but expanding segment of the UK hotel sector. Little has been published about them and the article sets out to provide a background and some characteristics of the sector. Indicates definitions together with some assessment of the size of the sector. Presents operational characteristics such as food and beverage services, security, design, staffing and pricing strategies. Considers marketing approaches, as well as the question of hotel classification and grading. Concludes that recent developments indicate a continued growth of a product which aims to differentiate itself from its competitors by personal service and good value.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1977

Clive Bingley, Clive Martin and Helen Moss

MELVYN BARNES, Borough Librarian & Arts Officer of the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (London), was asked to prepare a report for his libraries committee on the…

Abstract

MELVYN BARNES, Borough Librarian & Arts Officer of the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (London), was asked to prepare a report for his libraries committee on the possibility of selling withdrawn library books to the public—that rumbling bandwagon which inevitably looks attractive to local authorities in hard times.

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New Library World, vol. 78 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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