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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Peter W. Williams, Alison M. Gill and Neil Chura

This paper explores the potential influence and consequences of corpora te branding on mountain resort destinations. It examines the extent to which corporations emphasize…

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1153

Abstract

This paper explores the potential influence and consequences of corpora te branding on mountain resort destinations. It examines the extent to which corporations emphasize “placefulness” in the branding of their tourism products and services, as well as the degree to which they intentionally match their brands with values held by other destination stakeholders. “Placefulness” refers to the relative extent to which corporate branding strategies reinforce a destination's “sense of place” The findings suggest that a corporate as opposed to a community approach to branding is emerging in many tourism destinations. This has resulted in some significant redefinition of destination identities to reflect the changing needs of markets and corporations. Probably the most apparent identity shift in mountain communities brought on by corporate influence has involved the repositioning of many areas from being ski resorts to becoming four season destination resorts.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 59 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Peter W. Williams and Joseph Kelly

Emerging initiatives in British Columbia and elsewhere clearly suggest that by working with tourism stakeholders, the wine industry can not only contribute to the…

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4424

Abstract

Emerging initiatives in British Columbia and elsewhere clearly suggest that by working with tourism stakeholders, the wine industry can not only contribute to the development of rural tourism, but it can also gain valuable direct marketing and value added sales advantages. For these benefits to be fully realized, more must be known about the character of travel markets interested in wine tourism. To provide insights into BC's domestic wine tourist markets, this research involves two overriding phases of investigation. Initially, it conducts an overview analysis of BC's domestic wine tourists. The second phase of the study involves describing a small but valuable and growing niche market of culturally oriented wine tourists. It then suggests several product development strategies suited to attracting and retaining such wine tourists. The strategies relate to incorporating a range of wine and non‐wine related activities into the tourism experience, creating strong connections between local wines and regional cuisine, building cultural and heritage dimensions into wine tourism product packages, incorporating and promoting environmentally friendly resource management practices; and, protecting wine tourism landscapes. While the empirical part of this investigation is focused on BC wine tourists, the findings provide insights into strategies suited to other wine producing regions in Canada and elsewhere.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Peter W. Williams

Increasingly there has been a blurring of the boundaries between competition and cooperation in many sectors of the global economy. This trend has not escaped the tourism…

Abstract

Increasingly there has been a blurring of the boundaries between competition and cooperation in many sectors of the global economy. This trend has not escaped the tourism industry. Indeed, numerous examples exist where major players in the transportation, accomodation, and telecommunications sectors have joined forces.

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The Tourist Review, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Peter W. Williams and Aliaa Elkhashab

The purpose of this paper is to explore social capital emerging from the collective set of activities pursued by a network of stakeholders leveraging tourism benefits from…

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1797

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore social capital emerging from the collective set of activities pursued by a network of stakeholders leveraging tourism benefits from the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games (the Games).

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of an Olympic tourism consortium (the Consortium) established to garner tourism benefits from the Games illustrates the forms of social capital development emerging from this initiative. A three‐phased research process involving a literature review, key informant interviews with Consortium stakeholders, and a follow‐up on‐line survey with these representatives informs the study's data collection and analysis process. Aspects of bonding, bridging and linking social capital creation are examined.

Findings

Varying levels of confidence, trust, mutual respect, personal ties, shared values, and human capacity were generated through the Consortium's activities. This social capital was perceived as a valuable but fragile legacy capable of nurturing increased leadership and organizational capacity particularly when tackling issues confronting the industry's overall sustained prosperity. They also felt that the value and momentum of the social capital legacy might be imperiled by a limited appreciation of how to effectively activate it in a post‐Games environment.

Practical implications

Insights are provided into the social capital that networks of stakeholders can generate when working collectively to leverage benefits from sport mega‐events such as the Games.

Originality/value

The research contributes to emerging discussions concerning social capital leveraging in tourism related sport mega‐event management settings.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1961

Correspondents drew attention in the last issue of the B.F.J. to disparities in legal procedure for offences of a similar nature under the Food and Drugs Act, 1955. These…

Abstract

Correspondents drew attention in the last issue of the B.F.J. to disparities in legal procedure for offences of a similar nature under the Food and Drugs Act, 1955. These will have been apparent from the reading of reports of legal proceedings contained in the columns of this Journal. While many authorities lay charges under Section 2 of the Act for foreign matter found in food, others risk their cases under Section 8, notwithstanding the difficulty of proof under this section. As Dr. Eric Wood pointed out in his letter, the presence of animal excreta (sterilized by the baking process, for example) does not necessarily render food unfit for human food and reported cases on appeal tend to support this. When some year's ago it was held (in a civil claim, it is true) that Trichinella spiralis in pork, which would be subsequently cooked, did not render it unfit to be sold for food, we asked in editorial comment how long it would be before some similar kind of interpretation began to creep into food and drugs law.

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British Food Journal, vol. 63 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Robert Fildes and Charles Beard

Quantitative forecasting techniques see their greatest applicationas part of production and inventory systems. Perhaps unfortunately, theproblem has been left to systems…

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2659

Abstract

Quantitative forecasting techniques see their greatest application as part of production and inventory systems. Perhaps unfortunately, the problem has been left to systems analysts while the professional societies have contented themselves with exhortations to improve forecasting, neglecting recent developments from forecasting research. However, improvements in accuracy have a direct and often substantial financial impact. This article shows how the production and inventory control forecasting problem differs from other forecasting applications in its use of information and goes on to consider the characteristics of inventory type data. No single forecasting method is suited to all data series and the article then discusses how recent developments in forecasting methodology can improve accuracy. Considers approaches to extending the database beyond just the time‐series history of the data series. Concludes with a discussion of an “ideal” forecasting system and how far removed many popular programs used in production and inventory control are from this ideal.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Abstract

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Contemporary Destination Governance: A Case Study Approach
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-113-7

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Book part
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Abstract

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Contemporary Destination Governance: A Case Study Approach
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-113-7

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Abstract

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William A. Paton: A Study of his Accounting Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-408-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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