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Book part
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Stephen Turner

Abstract

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Mad Hazard
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-670-7

Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Anna Schliehe

Abstract

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Young Women's Carceral Geographies: Abandonment, Trouble and Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-050-9

Abstract

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Sensory Penalities: Exploring the Senses in Spaces of Punishment and Social Control
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-727-0

Book part
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Ronald Scott Wolf and Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez

Reputational crisis negatively affects brands and companies. This chapter, based on a single case study, aims to explore how prejudicial corporate statements directed…

Abstract

Purpose

Reputational crisis negatively affects brands and companies. This chapter, based on a single case study, aims to explore how prejudicial corporate statements directed toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals have affected the Italian multinational Barilla S.p.A., as well as how the company responded both internally and to the market in order to attempt to overcome the highly damaging consequences.

Design/Methodology

This chapter uses a single case-study methodology, which constitutes “a research strategy that focuses on understanding the dynamics present within single settings to create theoretical constructs, propositions and/or midrange theory from empirical evidence” (Eisenhardt, 1989, p. 534). The case-study design was chosen as it has been demonstrated to provide a methodological tool for both theory generation and theory testing (Gibbert et al., 2008).

Findings

Conclusions from the chapter indicate that negative, incendiary, and oftentimes comments citing either religious or stereotypical-based ideology negatively impact both the consumers and its associated publics in terms of product branding or reputation image.

Research Limitations

The study’s limitations, which rely primarily on a single case study and secondary research data, may motivate further investigative avenues, particularly as similarly referenced events continue to unfold almost daily, such as the study’s referenced incident with Philippine boxer Manny Pacquiao, as well as action taken by social media giants (Apple and Facebook) against the controversial media figure Alex Jones.

Practical and Social Implications

This chapter also looks at family succession roadblocks and navigating social media gaffes. These contemporary issues highlight challenges, strategies, sales and market share dynamics for the company, and suggestions for navigating the road ahead. The research concludes with possible linkages and insights for both ongoing management issues and potential areas for future research. Other findings indicate that rapid responses, particularly those citing concrete corporate policy changes or tangible actions, help to reverse and mitigate reputational damage, and contemporary approaches utilizing social media appear to buttress these efforts.

Originality/Value

This case study of Barilla as well as other firms mentioned, such as Chick-fil-A and Nike (which have experienced parallel situational crises), indicates that in only the last five years of contemporary international business practice, MNEs are continually and at times unexpectedly challenged by the lack of sensitivity demonstrated by their owners and spokespeople who utter comments which may be seen by the public as potentially harmful to the LGBT community. This study hopes to illuminate this challenge while offering tangible solutions to turning around future, similar situational crises.

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Diversity within Diversity Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-172-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2009

Peter Rushbrook and Lesley Preston

In the late 1960s the Victorian vocational education sector was in crisis. The federal Martin Report into tertiary education excised many of the sector’s university‐level…

Abstract

In the late 1960s the Victorian vocational education sector was in crisis. The federal Martin Report into tertiary education excised many of the sector’s university‐level courses and relocated them into new Colleges of Advanced Education (CAEs), leaving many ‘middle‐level’ and technician vocational courses in limbo. Junior technical schools also offered apprenticeship and middle‐level courses, further confusing where courses were, or should be situated, suggesting an overall ‘gap’ in program provision. This challenge came when the Technical Schools Division (TSD), the smallest of Victoria’s three division structure (primary, secondary and technical) continued its struggle to maintain sectoral identity through courting acceptance from private industry and the public sector for its credentialed programmes. With significant others, TSD Director Jack Kepert, followed by Director Ted Jackson, responded by designing policy to reshape the TSD’s structure and functions and its reporting relationships within a new technical college and junior technical school system. Jackson’s policy statement, The future role of technical schools and colleges (1970) facilitated these changes. The paper narrates the events constituting this period of policy innovation and evaluates their contribution to the creation of a more seamless

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History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

John Turner and Peter Oyelere

In the aftermath of the banking crisis in South‐East Asia, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has recommended that the South‐East Asian economies adopt several aspects…

Abstract

In the aftermath of the banking crisis in South‐East Asia, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has recommended that the South‐East Asian economies adopt several aspects of the New Zealand approach to bank supervision. The New Zealand approach relies heavily upon market incentives. This paper analyses three key aspects of the New Zealand supervisory regime: the removal of deposit insurance; the public disclosure regime; and the Reserve Bank of New Zealand's supervisory responsibilities. In this paper, we argue that this supervisory regime is built on weak foundations, and therefore, it should not be emulated by other economies.

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Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Peter Turner

664

Abstract

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Structural Survey, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Book part
Publication date: 23 January 2017

Jen Scott Curwood, Jayne C. Lammers and Alecia Marie Magnifico

Writers, their practices, and their tools are mediated by the contexts in which they work. In online spaces and classroom environments, today’s writers have increased…

Abstract

Writers, their practices, and their tools are mediated by the contexts in which they work. In online spaces and classroom environments, today’s writers have increased access to collaborators, readers, and reviewers. Drawing on our experiences as English teacher educators and as researchers of digital literacies and online affinity spaces, this chapter offers examples from three English teacher education programs in the United States and Australia to demonstrate how we link our research in out-of-school spaces to literacy practices in school contexts for our pre-service teachers. To do so, we share an illustrative example from each program and consider how in-class activities and assessment tasks can encourage pre-service teachers to learn about: the importance of clear goals and real-world audiences for writers; the value of self-sponsored, interest-driven writing in the English curriculum; and the role of authentic conversations between readers and writers as part of the writing, revising, and publishing process. The chapter concludes with recommendations for class activities and assessments that could be used within English education programs.

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Innovations in English Language Arts Teacher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-050-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Peter Jones, David Hillier and David Turner

Within the UK the past three decades have witnessed dramatic and continuing changes in the geography of retail provision. During this period the traditional supremacy of…

Abstract

Within the UK the past three decades have witnessed dramatic and continuing changes in the geography of retail provision. During this period the traditional supremacy of town and city centres at the top of the retail hierarchy has been increasingly successfully challenged by the development and diversification of out‐of‐town and edge of town shopping facilities. This ‘out of town exodus’ (Schiller, 1987) can be traced from the food superstores opened by grocery retailers from the late 1960's onwards through the development of retail warehouses, retail parks and regional shopping centres (Guy, 1994) to a more recent ‘fourth wave’ (Fernie, 1995) which include warehouse clubs, factory outlet centres and airport retailing. The cumulative effects of these developments are seen to pose a major challenge to retail businesses in town and city centres and perhaps more fundamentally to the centres themselves. The traditional spirit of the UK's town and country planning policies, first established some fifty years ago, was to positively support retail activity in town and city centres and to restrict out of town retail development (Guy, 1994). However, from the early 1980's onwards, such policies had only a limited effect in stemming the tide of retail decentralisation and they often seemed to be honoured more in the breach than in the observance.

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Management Research News, vol. 20 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Paul Rogers, Gail Miller, Brodie Paterson, Clive Bonnett, Peter Turner, Sue Brett, Karen Flynn and Jimmy Noak

Breakaway training is a mandatory training programme for mental health staff in both NHS and private services. However, the question that remains outstanding from the…

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Abstract

Breakaway training is a mandatory training programme for mental health staff in both NHS and private services. However, the question that remains outstanding from the recent guidance on the management of short‐term violence published by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) (NICE, 2005a; 2005b) is whether breakaway training is effective?This paper provides a history of and evidence for breakaway training, and a study examining the content of breakaway training in one English high secure hospital is provided.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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