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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Peter Sun and Sudong Shang

Servant leaders focus on their direct reports to enable them to grow to be independent and autonomous leaders. The purpose of this paper is to understand the way personal…

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5503

Abstract

Purpose

Servant leaders focus on their direct reports to enable them to grow to be independent and autonomous leaders. The purpose of this paper is to understand the way personal values and personality traits collectively influence this other-centered behavior. This will go a long way to unravel this unique style of leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The study surveys managers and their direct reports. Leaders rated their personality trait and personal values, while their direct reports rated the leader’s servant leadership behaviors. Age, educational level, conscientiousness, extraversion and neuroticism of leaders were used as controls. The study also checked for endogeneity threats.

Findings

Using a sample of 81 leaders and 279 of their direct reports, the study finds that the personal value of benevolent dependability relates negatively to servant leadership behaviors. In addition, the personality traits of agreeableness and openness/intellect moderate the relationship between benevolent dependability and servant leadership behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

The findings shed important insights into what motivates servant leaders to engage in other-directed behaviors, thereby enabling future research into individual characteristics that define servant leaders.

Originality/value

Although studies have examined how values and personality traits influence leadership behaviors, no research has examined both types of individual differences in a single study. Studies examining the individual differences of servant leaders are few, and this study answers the call by Liden et al. (2014) to examine individual characteristics that are both personality based (traits) and malleable (values).

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Samanthi Ekanayake, Paul Childerhouse and Peter Sun

Social network perspective to interorganizational relations focuses on the effect of organizations’ external relationships in collaboration as opposed to their internal…

Abstract

Purpose

Social network perspective to interorganizational relations focuses on the effect of organizations’ external relationships in collaboration as opposed to their internal resources and capabilities. It presumes that effectively managing such relationships is vital to gaining collaborative synergies. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the growing interest in the social network perspective to explain supply chain collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature from the network field is discussed in the context of interorganizational collaboration. A logistics service provider’s network is explored in depth leading to the inductive construction of a multi-level model of social network collaboration.

Findings

The conceptual model provides a useful lens to evaluate supply chain collaboration. The symbiotic relationship between interorganizational and interpersonal networks is highlighted as vital for effective collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual model has only been developed from a single network. Wider application is required to ensure generalizability. The critical role of the personal networks of boundary spanning actors at different levels wants further investigation.

Practical implications

Partners’ intra-organizational structures and personal ties of boundary spanners, both at the senior and operational level, have a profound effect on supply chain operations.

Originality/value

Personal networks interact with organizational networks and complement each other in yielding interfirm collaborative synergies.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Peter Yih‐Tong Sun and John L. Scott

In a rapidly changing business environment, the need to constantly adapt is deemed essential to maintain competitive advantage. This requires an optimum balance of…

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3147

Abstract

In a rapidly changing business environment, the need to constantly adapt is deemed essential to maintain competitive advantage. This requires an optimum balance of quantitative and qualitative measures to monitor progress and performance. This paper provides a framework of thought process that will guide practitioners in developing better qualitative measures and seeks to answer three essential questions: thought process 1 – what is the nature of reality? Provides the answer to the question, can the phenomenon be realistically measured? Thought process 2 – what are the processes used for constructing the measure? Provides answer to the question, are the processes appropriate and sufficiently influential? Thought process 3 – what usefulness and power does this measure provide? Provides answer to the question, is it powerful in a practical environment? The framework was applied to measurement in learning organization contexts and ten models were reviewed. Conclusions cover deficiencies in the models and suggestions on how they might be improved.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

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25

Abstract

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Peter Sun

This study is motivated by the question “how do organizational routines influence the three knowledge management processes of acquisition, creation, utilization and

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6809

Abstract

Purpose

This study is motivated by the question “how do organizational routines influence the three knowledge management processes of acquisition, creation, utilization and sharing?” and accordingly it seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework is first built by linking absorptive capacity (a routine‐based capability) with knowledge management processes. A literature search guided by the theoretical framework, and evidence from two case studies, were used to address the objective of the study.

Findings

The study elicited the organizational routines that influence the three knowledge management processes. These routines were then clustered into five key organizational themes: systemic knowledge; strategic engagement; social networking (external and internal); cultural context; process and structural context.

Research limitations/implications

Several implications for research are suggested. More specifically, the study offers five propositions that can be further tested. The key limitation of this study is the use of only two case studies for empirical data, and therefore further testing is needed.

Practical implications

The study shows that, although leadership behavior is critical for knowledge management, its impact depends on the platform of routines and processes built for it. The identified routines and their influence on knowledge management are invaluable for knowledge management practitioners.

Originality/value

The paper furthers understanding of how organizational routines influence the three knowledge management processes of knowledge acquisition, creation, utilization and sharing. This aspect has been little studied and is of value to both academics and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Fariza H. Rusly, James L. Corner and Peter Sun

This paper aims to propose a conceptual model for understanding the influence of change readiness on knowledge management processes and knowledge management effectiveness

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5702

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a conceptual model for understanding the influence of change readiness on knowledge management processes and knowledge management effectiveness. It is suggested that change readiness should be assessed as a multidimensional construct consisting of psychological and structural facets. Furthermore, as the process of managing organizational knowledge requires interaction among members of the organization, a holistic view of readiness at individual and organizational levels is presented.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review results in the development of the conceptual model that depicts potential relationships between change readiness and knowledge management processes. It also postulates the effects of different knowledge management processes on effective knowledge management implementation.

Findings

Potential implications of change readiness from both psychological and structural dimensions for knowledge acquisition, creation and sharing processes are put forward. Further, it offers possible fruitful areas for continuous research of knowledge management effectiveness from a change perspective.

Research limitations/implications

This article puts forward a number of potential relationships among the construct that are empirically testable to further understanding of multidimensional change readiness influences on the various types of knowledge management processes and its effective implementation.

Practical implications

Through a conceptualisation of the relationships between change readiness, knowledge management processes and knowledge management effectiveness, this paper offers a number of practical guidelines for the development of knowledge management policy and a road map from a change management perspective.

Originality/value

Previous literature on knowledge management focuses on understanding organizational readiness to promote successful knowledge management implementation in terms of the structural dimension. This paper proposes understanding of change readiness from a more comprehensive perspective comprising both psychological and structural readiness and its influences on knowledge management processes, which could affect overall effectiveness of knowledge management implementation.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Peter Y.T. Sun and John Scott

The paper sets out to provide a better understanding of the interfaces between second‐order change initiation by the “initiator” and the organizational contexts. It is an…

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1435

Abstract

Purpose

The paper sets out to provide a better understanding of the interfaces between second‐order change initiation by the “initiator” and the organizational contexts. It is an individual level study, and hence involves the dynamics experienced by the “initiator”. The type of second‐order change initiation under consideration is the book‐keeping model of cognitive replacement, i.e. a gradual and incremental replacement of the old cognitive framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework was developed using principles of complexity science to crystallize the thinking of the dynamics involved at the individual level initiation and organizational contexts. This formed the basis for the development of four research questions, explored using seven real world individual cases, taken from a variety of industry backgrounds.

Findings

The framework was refined using the case studies. The “initiator” goes through several stages in the gradual and incremental replacement of their cognitive framework. Four specific stages were observed: “embedded”, “embedded discomfited”, “scripted”, and “unscripted”. In each of the stages, issues in the interface with the organizational context were observed.

Research limitations/implications

Although saturation was reached after five individual cases, the research is limited by the number of individual cases.

Practical implications

Four practical avenues to nurture creativity in an organizational context are discussed: nurturing appropriate levels of contradiction in the organization, nurturing and encouraging creativity in others, developing self‐containment in individuals, and forming “opportunity‐finding teams” at middle level management.

Originality/value

The understanding of the interfaces between individual level initiation and organizational context is limited. This research provides insights into this phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 24 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Fariza Hanim Rusly, Peter Yih-Tong Sun and James L Corner

This study aims to show how change readiness shapes the knowledge acquisition process. The study elicits change readiness factors, at the individual and firm levels, that…

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2678

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to show how change readiness shapes the knowledge acquisition process. The study elicits change readiness factors, at the individual and firm levels, that influence the knowledge acquisition process and are based on the context of professional service firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative study is grounded in interpretive philosophy and adopts a multiple-case study design. Three New Zealand Professional Service firms were analyzed for this study. Using grounded theory analysis, categories and concepts of change readiness that shape knowledge acquisition were identified.

Findings

Knowledge acquisition understanding, knowledge acquisition context and individual differences, represent primary dimensions defining change readiness for the knowledge acquisition process. Finally, distinctive firm archetypes, inter-profession differences and professionals’ demography, affect the way change readiness elements shape the knowledge acquisition process in the firms studied.

Research limitations/implications

The study develops a theoretical model that shows how elements of change readiness, at the individual and organizational levels, influence knowledge acquisition. The study offers several propositions that could be tested in future studies. The study involves three professional service firms; hence, interpretation of the findings is limited.

Practical implications

A holistic understanding of change readiness factors that influence knowledge acquisition could mitigate failures of knowledge management processes in organizations.

Originality/value

It is the first empirical study that seeks to develop a theory on how change readiness elements influence knowledge acquisitions in the organization. To offer more contextualized findings, the study is done within the professional service industry.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Fariza Rusly, Peter Yih-Tong Sun and James L. Corner

The study aims to assess the influence of change readiness on the knowledge sharing process. This study proposes that readiness for knowledge sharing involves developing…

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2316

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to assess the influence of change readiness on the knowledge sharing process. This study proposes that readiness for knowledge sharing involves developing holistic understanding of the process through identification of individual and organisational readiness.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a qualitative case study design involving three New Zealand professional service firms (PFSs). Using grounded theory analysis, categories and concepts of change readiness that shape the knowledge sharing process were identified. The linkages among these elements offer an explanation of how readiness for knowledge sharing is formed.

Findings

Findings show that beliefs regarding knowledge sharing and individual expertise determine individual readiness to share knowledge. Readiness for the process is escalated by instilling collective commitment for knowledge sharing. A conducive organisational context, which comprises communication, participation and learning, represents a firm’s capability to implement the knowledge sharing process. Findings also highlight the moderating influences of firm archetype, inter-profession differences and knowledge nature in the interplay between change readiness elements and the knowledge sharing process.

Research limitations/implications

Findings reveal elements that motivate readiness for knowledge sharing from a change perspective. The propositions and theoretical model offered could extend understanding of the phenomena and lead to further studies assessing readiness for other knowledge management processes. The study involves three PFSs; hence, interpretation of the findings is limited within the scope and context of the study.

Practical implications

Findings contribute to the formulation of firms’ knowledge sharing strategies by offering holistic insights into the importance of motivating readiness for knowledge sharing through consideration of multidimensional change readiness: individual and collective beliefs, individuals’ characteristics and organisational context.

Originality/value

It is the first empirical study that seeks to develop theory how change readiness elements influences knowledge sharing in the organisation. To offer more contextualised findings, the study focusses on the phenomena of change readiness and knowledge sharing within the professional service industry.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Peter Yih‐Tong Sun and John L. Scott

The purpose of this research is to provide academics and practitioners with an insight to the barriers involved in knowledge transfer, arising from the levels of learning

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11003

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to provide academics and practitioners with an insight to the barriers involved in knowledge transfer, arising from the levels of learning in the organization (i.e. individual, team, organizational, and inter‐organizational).

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical research methodology, called the Delphi technique, was employed to investigate these barriers. Owing to the non‐threatening nature of the process, and its usefulness in obtaining a reliable consensus of opinion from a group of experts, it was deemed suitable for this research. The Delphi process was applied in two stages. In the first stage the major barriers in the transfer of knowledge in the levels of learning were obtained. Only the primary paths of transfer were considered, i.e. individual to team (and vice versa), team to the organization (and vice versa), and organization to inter‐organization. In the second stage Delphi process, the critical sources from which these barriers arise were derived.

Findings

A total of 14 sources from which the barriers arise were obtained. The significant impact of these sources on the levels of learning, as perceived by the Delphi participants, was derived.

Practical implications

This research provides useful insights for practitioners wanting to minimize barriers and optimize knowledge transfer across the organizations. It also serves as a useful base for researchers to expand further research into barriers of knowledge transfer.

Originality/value

This research is the first attempt made, using Delphi methodology, to analyze the barriers to knowledge transfer from a holistic perspective. It considers the levels of learning, providing academics with a base to consider other paths of knowledge transfer.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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