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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Radostina A. Angelova, George Pichurov, Iskra Simova, Peter Stankov and Iosu Rodrigo

– The purpose of the paper is to simulate the effect of clothing insulation and activity on the interaction between the human body and the environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to simulate the effect of clothing insulation and activity on the interaction between the human body and the environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A thermo-physiological model, integrated into a Fluent CFD software package is applied. The temperature of the skin surface, clothing surface and heat flux (dry and total heat flux) through layers of clothing with different insulation level are numerically investigated in function of the clothing insulation and the different activities performed indoors.

Findings

The increase of the clothing insulation leads to increase of both skin and clothing temperature. Higher temperature difference ΔT between the room temperature and skin temperature provokes more dynamic change of the skin temperature and decreases the thermal comfort of the person. The increase of the metabolic rate, however, leads to more uniform skin temperature, regardless the temperature difference ΔT. With the increase of the clothing insulation for a constant metabolic rate the total heat flux remains constant, but the dry heat flux decreases, while the evaporative heat flux increases.

Originality/value

The joint influence of clothing insulation and indoor activities on the thermal interaction between the body and the environment is assesses using a thermo-physiological model, integrated in a CFD software package.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

George Pichurov, Radostina Angelova, Iskra Simova, Iosu Rodrigo and Peter Stankov

The purpose of this paper is to integrate a thermophysiological human body model into a CFD simulation to predict the dry and latent body heat loss, the clothing, skin and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate a thermophysiological human body model into a CFD simulation to predict the dry and latent body heat loss, the clothing, skin and core temperature, skin wettedness and periphery blood flow distribution. The integration of the model allows to generate more realistic boundary conditions for the CFD simulation and allows to predict the room distribution of temperature and humidity originating from the occupants.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-dimensional thermophysiological body model is integrated into a CFD simulation to predict the interaction between the human body and room environment. Parameters varied were clothing insulation and metabolic activity and supply air temperature. The body dry and latent heat loss, skin wettedness, skin and core temperatures were predicted together with the room air temperature and humidity.

Findings

Clothing and metabolic activity were found to have different level of impact on the dry and latent heat loss. Heat loss was more strongly affected by changes in the metabolic rate than in the clothing insulation. Latent heat loss was found to exhibit much larger variations compared to dry heat loss due to the high latent heat potential of water.

Originality/value

Unlike similar studies featuring naked human body, clothing characteristics like sensible resistance and vapor permeability were accommodated into the present study. A method to ensure numerical stability of the integrated simulation was developed and implemented to produce robust and reliable simulation performance.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 February 2020

Uglješa Stankov, Viachaslau Filimonau, Ulrike Gretzel and Miroslav D. Vujičić

The purpose of this paper is to introduce e-mindfulness as a tourism trend. Mindfulness meditation is becoming increasingly mainstream, which is reflected in a rapidly…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce e-mindfulness as a tourism trend. Mindfulness meditation is becoming increasingly mainstream, which is reflected in a rapidly growing number of related technology applications. Such technology-assisted mindfulness is typically referred to as e-mindfulness. The e-mindfulness trend creates opportunities for the tourism industry but also implies changed consumer perspectives on tourist experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a general review of academic literature, news reports and online resources regarding the offerings of related technologies.

Findings

Implications of e-mindfulness for consumers, tourism service providers and designers of future tourism experiences are outlined.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to conceptualize e-mindfulness as a tourism trend.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Ingrid Smithey Fulmer and Bruce Barry

What does it mean to be a “smart” negotiator? Few scholars have paid much attention to this question, a puzzling omission given copious research suggesting that cognitive…

Abstract

What does it mean to be a “smart” negotiator? Few scholars have paid much attention to this question, a puzzling omission given copious research suggesting that cognitive ability (the type of intelligence commonly measured by psychometric tests) predicts individual performance in many related contexts. In addition to cognitive ability, other definitions of intelligence (e.g., emotional intelligence) have been proposed that theoretically could influence negotiation outcomes. Aiming to stimulate renewed attention to the role of intelligence in negotiation, we develop theoretical propositions linking multiple forms of intelligence to information acquisition, decision making, and tactical choices in bargaining contexts. We outline measurement issues relevant to empirical work on this topic, and discuss implications for negotiation teaching and practice.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Ante Mandić, Smiljana Pivčević and Lidija Petrić

Building on a TripAdvisor data for five Mediterranean destinations, namely, Greece, Croatia, Italy, France and Spain, this study analyses the constituents of restaurants'…

Abstract

Building on a TripAdvisor data for five Mediterranean destinations, namely, Greece, Croatia, Italy, France and Spain, this study analyses the constituents of restaurants' online reputation and their interrelation with destination competitiveness, in particular two Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Index (TTCI) pillars, namely, Prioritisation of Travel and Tourism and Price Competitiveness.

The analysis has revealed that restaurants' online reputation is positively influenced by two factors, namely, Core elements, i.e. cooking, service and price-quality ratio, and Price. Furthermore, the restaurants' online reputation does not influence destination competitiveness (TTCI) directly, but indirectly throughout its main constituents, i.e. service and price. Price is the only variable with significant influence on overall TTCI. Within the sample of these destinations, Balkan countries, i.e. Greece and Croatia, perform very well in terms of their restaurants' online reputation. On the other hand, considering the overall TTCI rating, their competitive positions are substantially lower than those of Italy, France and Spain.

The study provides new insights into the relationship between gastronomic offer and destination competitiveness, and valuable practical implications for destination and hospitality management. Moreover, this study addresses various gaps in existing research on this topic. Specifically, it validates the reputation elements presented online using TripAdvisor data and analyses the impact of electronic Word of Mouth (eWOM) not only as the outcome variable of other constructs, as is the case in the literature, but also as a central construct of the analysis. In doing so, it extends current research on this topic and fills the gap regarding the inclusion of the supply-side stakeholder perspective, which has long been recognised as necessary in any attempts to measure competitiveness.

Details

Gastronomy for Tourism Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-755-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

John Antonakis

Emotional intelligence (EI) has been embraced by many practitioners and academicians without clear empirical support for the construct. In this rejoinder and extension of…

Abstract

Emotional intelligence (EI) has been embraced by many practitioners and academicians without clear empirical support for the construct. In this rejoinder and extension of an earlier comment, I highlight the importance of using methodologically defensible scientific criteria for conducting or evaluating research. I review literature demonstrating that EI models are beset with problems concerning their validity and show that support for the EI construct may be based more on tangential speculation than on empirical findings. Although I find some common positions with EI researchers such as Prati et al., I underline contradictions and inconsistencies which may cast doubt on the necessity of EI for understanding and predicting leadership effectiveness.

Details

Organizational Analysis, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1551-7470

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Neal M Ashkanasy, Claire E Ashton-James and Peter J Jordan

We review the literature on stress in organizational settings and, based on a model of job insecurity and emotional intelligence by Jordan, Ashkanasy and Härtel (2002)…

Abstract

We review the literature on stress in organizational settings and, based on a model of job insecurity and emotional intelligence by Jordan, Ashkanasy and Härtel (2002), present a new model where affective responses associated with stress mediate the impact of workplace stressors on individual and organizational performance outcomes. Consistent with Jordan et al., emotional intelligence is a key moderating variable. In our model, however, the components of emotional intelligence are incorporated into the process of stress appraisal and coping. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the implications of these theoretical developments for understanding emotional and behavioral responses to workplace.

Details

Emotional and Physiological Processes and Positive Intervention Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-238-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Wee Chan Au and Pervaiz K. Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to explore the harmful effects of negative externality at both national and firm level by identifying practices that impact Malaysian…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the harmful effects of negative externality at both national and firm level by identifying practices that impact Malaysian Chinese ' s well-being in the form of work-life imbalance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts an emic approach using phenomenological enquiry to investigate what factors influence and shape work-life balance experience of Malaysian Chinese working adults. Emic approach, which takes into account elements that are indigenous to a particular culture, is useful to explore the uniqueness of the Malaysian context. Semi-structured interviews with six Malaysian Chinese working adults were conducted to understand their experience of work-life balance in the Malaysian Chinese context.

Findings

The findings highlight how contextual elements in the macro-environment (such as government legislation and policy, societal values, and practices) and the firm environment (owner and leadership values, superiors’ attitude) come together to shape the overall experience of work-life balance among Chinese Malaysians. The findings show that current work-life practices in Malaysia fall short in a number of ways, which ultimately leads to an unsustainable human resource position for Malaysian firms.

Practical implications

From a practical perspective the paper highlights the need to focus on employees’ work-life balance as a means to create sustainable and productive workplaces.

Originality/value

Given that the concept of work-life balance is grounded in western literature, it is important to explore the nature and relevance work-life balance in sustaining human resources in nonwestern, especially less developed business settings. Findings of this study contribute to the work-life literature by exploring the work-life balance experience in Malaysia through emic approach using a phenomenological lens. The findings identify a shortfall in sustainable people management arising through the interplay of unique negative externality multi-level contextual factors.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Peter Love, David Edwards and Elliot Wood

A perennial problem faced by construction professionals, educators and researchers is what needs to be done to improve project performance? In addressing this question…

Abstract

Purpose

A perennial problem faced by construction professionals, educators and researchers is what needs to be done to improve project performance? In addressing this question, the need for the switching of lenses from the dominant operations paradigm to one that focuses on organizational behavior is advocated. Emotional intelligence (EI) is a growing area of behavioral investigation which is considered to be positively related to occupational success, satisfaction, emotional health and adjustment. This paper aims to look at its influence.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper emotions are examined and the usefulness measures of EI are discussed and critiqued. The paper then looks more closely at the way in which EI may relate to success in a common position within the construction industry, that of the construction manager.

Findings

Recommendations are made on the ways in which research and practice can contribute to project success through attention to the link between EI and project performance.

Practical implications

In construction, there is a real need to examine how individuals, teams and the structure of projects influence behavior, if the improvements being sought within the industry are to be realistically achieved. Potentially EI, in conjunction with other assessment tools, could be used by construction organizations to significantly improve the performance of construction managers and their teams.

Originality/value

Several researchers in construction have begun to examine EI but have limited understanding about its underlying origins and the problems associated with many of the tools that have been developed. The paper provides invaluable guidance about how EI could be used to improve the performance of construction projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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