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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

KEVIN M. O'CONNOR and CHARLES H. DOWDING

To simulate the kinematics associated with mining‐induced subsidence in a blocky rock mass, a hybrid rigid block model was developed by combining a small displacement code…

Abstract

To simulate the kinematics associated with mining‐induced subsidence in a blocky rock mass, a hybrid rigid block model was developed by combining a small displacement code with a large displacement code. Gravity was applied to a rigid block mesh using an implicit formulation and the equilibrium displacements are then used as initial conditions for an explicit analysis in which excavation of a longwall mine panel and subsequent subsidence was simulated. A parameter study was performed to evaluate the influence of rigid block contact stiffness, vertical joint density, and contact roughness on mining‐induced strata movements for comparison with previously obtained field measurements. The best agreement between measured and calculated displacements was obtained when a relatively low stiffness value was maintained constant for all contacts. A surprising result was that neither increasing the density of vertical joints nor reducing the rigid block contact roughness improved the agreement between measured and simulated displacements.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Peter Cook and John Howitt

In an attempt to rethink business after the worst recession for many decades, it is vital to rethink leadership and the sorts of HR strategies that will help companies

Abstract

Purpose

In an attempt to rethink business after the worst recession for many decades, it is vital to rethink leadership and the sorts of HR strategies that will help companies thrive and survive in ways that are genuinely sustainable. This paper aims to explore three musical genres and their connections and contrasts with leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

Through literature reviews informed by qualitative and action research, the paper reviews three musical paradigms and connects them with leadership practices.

Findings

In an ever‐complex world, leadership needs to convey complex concepts simply and concisely. It also needs to value diverse talents in ways that go beyond the usual definitions of diversity.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative/action research inevitably needs to be backed up by more formal research into the topic. This paper offers an agenda for action and further qualitative/quantitative research.

Practical implications

Great leaders also have personal mastery, whilst also being able to tune in to the world around them. These are skills that can be learned/enhanced through experiential learning in the main.

Social implications

Great leaders make complexity compellingly clear. They do this through providing sufficient structure to enable people to be their best. Music is the analogy of choice for making complex communications clear and there is much more to understand in this area.

Originality/value

Much effort has been expended on examining the parallels between business leadership and sports. Relatively little effort has been spent on music, which offers unique insights into the questions of diversity and teamwork in the context of high performance.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Füsun F. Gönül and Peter T.L. Popkowski Leszczyc

Online auctions, which have become an important aspect of online sales, are generally regarded as stand‐alone events. However, in contrast to offline auctions, online…

Abstract

Purpose

Online auctions, which have become an important aspect of online sales, are generally regarded as stand‐alone events. However, in contrast to offline auctions, online auctions can be subject to the presence of simultaneous competing auctions. The purpose of this study is to model and estimate determinants of elapsed time to switch across concurrent auctions, with special attention to unobserved heterogeneity among bidders.

Design/methodology/approach

Since auctions are dynamic and since the current winning bid progresses over time, the authors study time dependency over the course of an auction with hazard function models. To account for unobserved heterogeneity, the paper uses a latent class approach, which identifies bidder segments based on both observed and unobserved factors.

Findings

The findings show significant heterogeneity across bidders, revealed by their varying degrees of propensity to switch across auctions. The three segments of bidders are The Inerts – about 30 percent, The Switchers – less than 10 percent, and The In‐Betweens. According to the findings, bidders can induce other bidders to switch to a concurrent auction by responding quickly to the current high bid. Moreover, the paper finds a surprisingly high degree of inertia and reluctance to switch towards the end of the auction when bidding is most critical.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to model elapsed time to switch from one auction to a simultaneous auction for an identical product, and to investigate determinants of the time required to switch, with special attention to unobserved heterogeneity across bidders.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Cara Peters, Jane Thomas and Holly Tolson

In recent years, cause‐related marketing (CRM) has made a significant impact on businesses and charitable organizations. However, the study of CRM as a unique retailing…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, cause‐related marketing (CRM) has made a significant impact on businesses and charitable organizations. However, the study of CRM as a unique retailing format has received limited academic exploration. Central to this study's investigation is not just shopping® (NJS), an organization that uses CRM as a basis for its retailing model. This study seeks to examine cause‐related retailing (CRR) and the perceptions of three vested parties: consumers who have purchased from NJS events; vendors who sell at NJS events; and the NJS business owner.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary factors that potentially impact CRR efforts were explored through an extensive literature search and qualitative data collection. Data were collected via in‐depth interviews with 13 shoppers, 15 vendors and the NJS business owner. The data were analyzed and interpreted according to the protocol for case study research as outlined by Yin.

Findings

This study of the three vested parties from NJS found that the CRR model differs slightly from that of CRM. Findings from this study suggest that consumers are motivated primarily by the location, vast array of unique products, and social benefits as opposed to the support of the charitable cause.

Research limitations/implications

This study makes an important contribution to the CRM and CRR literature. Results also provide support for trends in retailing that show how consumers are actively searching for unique, non‐commoditized items. The findings illustrate that a combination of diverse retailing and socialization benefits, not price, drives this particular retailing venue. Additional research is needed to investigate the issues surrounding why the charitable cause is not a significant motivating factor in retail purchase decisions.

Originality/value

This research is original to the retailing and CRM literatures. One of the benefits of this exploratory study is that it provided the authors with an opportunity to examine a unique retailing venue, NJS, and to explore the impact of CRR on purchases.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Jane Boyd Thomas and Cara Peters

The purpose of the present study is to explore the collective consumption rituals associated with Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, and one of the largest shopping…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to explore the collective consumption rituals associated with Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, and one of the largest shopping days in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design for this study followed the approach of psychological phenomenological interviewing. Over a two‐year period, the authors, along with trained research assistants, conducted interviews with experienced female Black Friday shoppers.

Findings

Qualitative data from 38 interviews indicated that Black Friday shopping activities constitute a collective consumption ritual that is practiced and shared by multiple generations of female family members and close friends. Four themes emerged from the data: familial bonding, strategic planning, the great race, and mission accomplished. The themes coalesced around a military metaphor.

Practical implications

The findings of this study indicate that Black Friday shoppers plan for the ritual by examining advertisements and strategically mapping out their plans for the day. Recommendations for retailers are presented.

Originality/value

This exploratory investigation of Black Friday as a consumption ritual offers new insight into the planning and shopping associated with this well‐known American pseudo‐holiday. Findings also extend theory and research on collective consumption rituals.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Karamarie Fecho, Charity G. Moore, Anne T. Lunney, Peter Rock, Edward A. Norfleet and Philip G. Boysen

This paper aims to determine the one‐year incidence of, and risk factors for, perioperative adverse events during in‐patient and out‐patient anesthesia‐assisted procedures.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the one‐year incidence of, and risk factors for, perioperative adverse events during in‐patient and out‐patient anesthesia‐assisted procedures.

Design/methodology/approach

A quality assurance database was the primary data source. Outcome variables were death and the occurrence of any adverse event. Risk factors were ASA physical status (PS), age, duration and type of anesthesia care, number of operating rooms running, concurrency level and medical staff. Data were stratified by in‐patient or out‐patient, surgical (e.g. thoracotomy) or non‐surgical (e.g. electroconvulsive therapy), and were analyzed using Chi square, Fisher's exact test and generalized estimating equations.

Findings

Of 27,970 procedures, 49.8 percent were out‐patient and greater than 80 percent were surgical. For surgical procedures, adverse event rates were higher for in‐patient than out‐patient procedures (2.11 percent vs. 1.45 percent; p<0.001). For non‐surgical procedures, adverse event rates were similar for in‐patients and out‐patients (0.54 percent vs. 0.36 percent). The types of adverse events differed for in‐patient and out‐patient surgical procedures (p<0.001), but not for non‐surgical procedures. ASA PS, age, duration of anesthesia care, anesthesia type and medical staff assigned to the case were each associated with adverse event rates, but the association depended on the type of procedure.

Practical implications

In‐patient and out‐patient surgical procedures differ in the incidence of perioperative adverse events, and in risk factors, suggesting a need to develop separate monitoring strategies.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to assess perioperative adverse events amongst in‐patient and out‐patient procedures.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Jaya Halepete, Jan Hathcote and Cara Peters

To examine the variables that influence micromarketing merchandising in the apparel industry in order to help new retailer understand the importance of micromarketing…

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the variables that influence micromarketing merchandising in the apparel industry in order to help new retailer understand the importance of micromarketing merchandising.

Design/methodology/approach

A model was developed showing the different variables that influenced micromarketing merchandising. General merchandising managers of 20 US‐based apparel retail chains were interviewed using a questionnaire developed after analyzing the available literature. A qualitative method of data analysis was conducted and the model was revised based on the findings of the research.

Findings

A qualitative analysis of the transcribed interviews indicated that assortment, demographics, pricing and customer loyalty were the primary variables that effected micromarketing merchandising in the apparel retail industry. The sub‐variables in the study included lifestyle, ethnicity, store size and location, and customer service.

Research limitations/implications

The research was limited to US‐based apparel retailers. Future research could be directed towards in‐depth quantitative analysis of each variable influencing micromarketing merchandising.

Practical implications

The results of this study could be used by managers of retail chains to understand the various variables that need to be considered while micromarketing merchandising for their store. Based on the area the store is located in, the importance of each variable can be adjusted to best suit specific stores.

Originality/value

Understanding the importance of micromarketing merchandising can help new retailers study their consumers based on the important dimensions reported in this research and buy the right product for their target consumers.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

David Gracon

This personal, non-fiction essay explores the punk subculture and themes of death as a teenager growing up in the post-industrial city of Buffalo, New York, in the 1990s…

Abstract

This personal, non-fiction essay explores the punk subculture and themes of death as a teenager growing up in the post-industrial city of Buffalo, New York, in the 1990s. Within this text, punk and indie music releases, exposure to live performances in unconventional spaces, independent record stores as an alternative education, and participatory fanzine culture, serve as a pivotal catalyst for rejuvenation and release – for creativity and self-expression while grieving the loss of one’s mother from cancer. The punk subculture and its related ‘do-it-yourself’ (DIY) media communities which eventually led to a professorship prove to be both inspirational and a transformative method of healing and being.

Details

Music and Death: Interdisciplinary Readings and Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-945-3

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2018

Yuanqiang Chen, H. Zheng, Wei Li and Shan Lin

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new three-node triangular element in the framework of the numerical manifold method (NMM), which is designated by Trig3-MLScns.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new three-node triangular element in the framework of the numerical manifold method (NMM), which is designated by Trig3-MLScns.

Design/methodology/approach

The formulation uses the improved parametric shape functions of classical triangular elements (Trig3-0) to construct the partition of unity (PU) and the moving least square (MLS) interpolation method to construct the local approximation function.

Findings

Compared with the classical three-node element (Trig3-0), the Trig3-MLScns element has a higher order of approximations, much better accuracy and continuous nodal stress. Moreover, the linear dependence problem associated with many PU-based methods with high-order approximations is eliminated in the present element. A number of numerical examples indicate the high accuracy and robustness of the Trig3-MLScns element.

Originality/value

The proposed element inherits the individual merits of the NMM and the MLS.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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