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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2019

Peter Reddy and Rachel Shaw

Research into the experience of BSc Psychology students and graduates in the graduate transition was carried out to enquire if ontology is central to educational…

Abstract

Purpose

Research into the experience of BSc Psychology students and graduates in the graduate transition was carried out to enquire if ontology is central to educational transformation; if professional work experience is important in the process of becoming; and how graduates experience the transition from student to professional. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative longitudinal in-depth interview investigation four one-year work placement students were interviewed twice and five graduates were interviewed at graduation and again two years later. Student transcriptions were analysed thematically and graduate transcriptions received interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

Placement students became legitimate participants in professional life. Graduates thought that BSc Psychology should enable a career and were dissatisfied when it did not. Professional psychology dominated career aspiration. Relationships and participation in work communities of practice were highly significant for learning, personal and professional identity and growth.

Practical implications

Ontology may be central to educational transformation in BSc Psychology and is facilitated by integrated work experience. A more vocational focus is also advocated.

Originality/value

The UK Bachelor’s degree in psychology is increasingly concerned with employability however becoming a professional requires acting and being as well as knowledge and skills and Barnett and others have called for higher education to embrace an ontological turn. This is explored in the context of BSc Psychology student experience and reflection on work placements, graduation and early career development.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Rowena Yeats, Peter Reddy, Anne Wheeler, Carl Senior and John Murray

Academic writing is often considered to be a weakness in contemporary students, while good reporting and writing skills are highly valued by graduate employers. A number…

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1132

Abstract

Purpose

Academic writing is often considered to be a weakness in contemporary students, while good reporting and writing skills are highly valued by graduate employers. A number of universities have introduced writing centres aimed at addressing this problem; however, the evaluation of such centres is usually qualitative. The paper seeks to consider the efficacy of a writing centre by looking at the impact of attendance on two “real world” quantitative outcomes – achievement and progression.

Design/methodology/approach

Data mining was used to obtain records of 806 first‐year students, of whom 45 had attended the writing centre and 761 had not.

Findings

A highly significant association between writing centre attendance and achievement was found. Progression to year two was also significantly associated with writing centre attendance.

Originality/value

Further, quantitative evaluation of writing centres is advocated using random allocation to a comparison condition to control for potential confounds such as motivation.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Michael J.R. Butler and Peter Reddy

This paper aims to focus on developing critical understanding in human resource management (HRM) students in Aston Business School, UK. The paper reveals that innovative…

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1667

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on developing critical understanding in human resource management (HRM) students in Aston Business School, UK. The paper reveals that innovative teaching methods encourage deep approaches to study, an indicator of students reaching their own understanding of material and ideas. This improves student employability and satisfies employer need.

Design/methodology/approach

Student response to two second year business modules, matched for high student approval rating, was collected through focus group discussion. One module was taught using EBL and the story method, whilst the other used traditional teaching methods. Transcripts were analysed and compared using the structure of the ASSIST measure.

Findings

Critical understanding and transformative learning can be developed through the innovative teaching methods of enquiry‐based learning (EBL) and the story method.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation is that this is a single case study comparing and contrasting two business modules. The implication is that the study should be replicated and developed in different learning settings, so that there are multiple data sets to confirm the research finding.

Practical implications

Future curriculum development, especially in terms of HE, still needs to encourage students and lecturers to understand more about the nature of knowledge and how to learn. The application of EBL and the story method is described in a module case study – “Strategy for Future Leaders”.

Originality/value

This is a systematic and comparative study to improve understanding of how students and lecturers learn and of the context in which the learning takes place.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Uwe Kehrel and Nathalie Sick

Researchers began investigating the diffusion of renewable energy technologies (RETs) in the late 1990s, and, up to today, a variety of authors have presented different…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers began investigating the diffusion of renewable energy technologies (RETs) in the late 1990s, and, up to today, a variety of authors have presented different approaches to understand the special characteristics of RET diffusion. However, one factor has been thus far disregarded in the research: the influence of raw material prices on RET diffusion. The dependence of a multitude of technologies on raw material prices became especially apparent in recent years due to rather sudden and volatile price movements in raw material markets. Thus, the aim of this work is to contribute to the research by providing evidence for a direct linkage between raw material price developments and RET diffusion.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework used in this article derives from the concept of induced diffusion. This empirical study is based on publicly available data of 18 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries over 20 years and uses multivariate regression analysis to identify the corresponding diffusion models for selected established and emerging RETs.

Findings

Results reveal that crude oil prices play a crucial role in the diffusion of emerging RETs. In addition, a joint reflection of induced diffusion and path dependencies as the theoretical foundation of RET diffusion models might be reasonable.

Originality/value

This paper makes a significant contribution to the literature on induced diffusion in the field of renewable energies by providing insights from publicly available data from 18 OECD-countries. The findings are highly relevant for managers of the energy industry and policymakers in this field.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Carl Senior and Robert Cubbidge

The purpose of this paper is to place all of the contributions to this special issue into a theoretical framework and to highlight the role that the so‐called “information…

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1942

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to place all of the contributions to this special issue into a theoretical framework and to highlight the role that the so‐called “information age mindset” has in the facilitation of employability skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the major themes of this special issue.

Findings

Undergraduate students do see the importance of technological innovation in the classroom but they see the development of experiential or work‐based skills to be more important.

Practical implications

Future curriculum design should consider the expectations and attitudes of the modern day undergraduate student to ensure that potential employability is maximised.

Originality/value

The findings are placed into the wider context of the emerging field of evolutionary educational psychology.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

David P. Stowell and Nicholas Kawar

During December 2012, Jorge Paulo Lemann, a co-founder and partner at 3G, proposed to Warren Buffett that 3G and Berkshire Hathaway acquire H. J. Heinz Company. Lemann and…

Abstract

During December 2012, Jorge Paulo Lemann, a co-founder and partner at 3G, proposed to Warren Buffett that 3G and Berkshire Hathaway acquire H. J. Heinz Company. Lemann and Buffett, who had known each other for years, jointly decided that the Heinz turnaround had been successful and that there was significant potential for continued global growth. 3G informed Heinz CEO William Johnson that it and Berkshire Hathaway were interested in jointly acquiring his company. Johnson then presented the investors' offer of $70.00 per share of outstanding common stock to the Heinz board.

After much discussion, the Heinz board and its advisors informed 3G that without better financial terms they would not continue to discuss the possibility of an acquisition. Two days later, 3G and Berkshire Hathaway returned with a revised proposal of $72.50 per share, for a total transaction value of $28 billion (including Heinz's outstanding debt).

Following a forty-day “go-shop” period, Heinz, 3G, and Berkshire Hathaway agreed to sign the deal. But was this, in fact, a fair deal? And what might be the future consequences for shareholders, management, employees, and citizens of Pittsburgh, the location of the company's headquarters? Last, what was the role of activist investors in bringing Heinz to this deal stage?

After reading and analyzing the case, students will be able to:

  • Understand the influence of investment bankers on M&A transactions

  • Consider synergies that drive M&A

  • Consider the role of activist investors in corporate strategic decision-making

  • Understand the impact of M&A on key corporate stakeholders

  • Apply core valuation techniques to support M&A valuation

Understand the influence of investment bankers on M&A transactions

Consider synergies that drive M&A

Consider the role of activist investors in corporate strategic decision-making

Understand the impact of M&A on key corporate stakeholders

Apply core valuation techniques to support M&A valuation

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Peter M. Pinsky and Raja V. Jasti

A new laminated composite plate finite element is proposed that is numerically stable and accurate in displacements and stresses, including transverse shear stress. The…

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31

Abstract

A new laminated composite plate finite element is proposed that is numerically stable and accurate in displacements and stresses, including transverse shear stress. The formulation is based on the Hellinger—Reissner principle with Mindlin kinematics. All stress components are given independent approximations and do not satisfy equilibrium conditions a priori. A novel feature of the formulation is the additive decomposition of the displacement field into two parts corresponding to nodal interpolations and independent local basis functions. The additional basis functions and their associated parameters play an important role in characterizing the accuracy of the element. These functions eliminate shear locking in the lower order elements and provide additional variational constraints on the stresses, leading to very accurate results. A 4‐node and a 9‐node version are developed and it is shown that both elements pass the patch test suggested by Zienkiewicz et al. and are stable in the sense of the Babuška—Brezzi condition. The special structure of the element flexibility matrix provides computational efficiency approaching that of displacement based formulations.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Sara Emma Rieke, Deborah Clay Fowler, Hyo Jung Chang and Natalia Velikova

The purpose of this paper is to determine which factors impact body image satisfaction of Generation Y college age and young professional females born between the years of…

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4707

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine which factors impact body image satisfaction of Generation Y college age and young professional females born between the years of 1980 and 1993, age 20-33 years in the State of Texas.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey created in Qualtrics was e-mailed to recruit research participants. Quantitative data were collected and analyzed in IBM SPSS Statistics 21. Exploratory factor analysis, reliability, computing variable mean, and linear multiple regression were performed. The variables explored were divided and grouped into major factors.

Findings

Millennial females are influenced by their own personal preferences, morals and beliefs, and certain occasions, seasons, climate, and the weather. These factors significantly influence body image satisfaction. The model developed in this study provides researchers with a new perspective on body image satisfaction and purchase intent. This study extends the theory of reasoned action by identifying specific factors which influence body image satisfaction which leads to the final purchase decision.

Research limitations/implications

Because of this method of data collection the study might not be generalizable to the entire Millennial population. The sample is a small representative sample in the population with only Millennial females’ ages 20-33 years in the State of Texas. Although the study focussed on a single state, the state is an extremely large state encompassing 36 percent of the USA population. Additionally, race/ethnic diversity was also a limitation, as the majority of the sample was Caucasian. Thus, a larger and more diverse sample of age, race/ethnicity, and residence could be added for more generalizable results.

Practical implications

The findings of this study enable retailers to understand how body image can impact the customers perceptions of their stores and their employees. Marketers and retailers should focus on marketing to Millennial females through more personal approach targeting what is appropriate for the consumers size body type labeled clothing size and certain occasions.

Social implications

Confidence in decision making while purchasing apparel is an important aspect of shopping. Further research could benefit from focussing on determining the confidence drivers and their origins.

Originality/value

This study enhances literature by providing a glimpse into the minds of Generation Y female consumers’ body image satisfaction and the factors driving them to purchase apparel.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

K. Srinivasa Reddy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the underpricing of initial public offers (IPOs), which were announced by Indian firms for the period 2007 through 2009. It is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the underpricing of initial public offers (IPOs), which were announced by Indian firms for the period 2007 through 2009. It is motivated by the fact that a well-developed capital market is a function of economic growth and a reflection of the financial system. Thus, this study investigates aftermarket pricing performance of IPOs during the recent global financial crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper studies the underpricing of 133 IPOs in three groups, namely, house-full collections, short-run and long-run periods. To do so, it uses event study method to observe underpricing, which is examined in various window periods. Further, industry- and year-wise offers are analyzed and interpreted. Accordingly, hypotheses are being developed and tested through a static “analysis of variance”.

Findings

The study explores that post-listing IPOs assure positive returns in the short run, but they tend to plunge and become negative in the long run. In particular, highest returns have been observed in the first week of post-listing.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include, the study does not compute market-adjusted returns to find abnormal performance of stocks, and does not apply regression statistic to examine the factors that affect underpricing.

Practical implications

Eventually, conclusions are drawn from India–international results, and thus it would add some new insights on investor perspectives (e.g. price signalling) to the existing IPOs literature, especially from Asian markets context.

Originality/value

This paper is an original research that examines the underpricing of Indian IPOs during the recent financial crisis, particularly in three groups: house-full collections, short-run and long-run periods.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2011

Tresa Andrews, Leena Reddy and Paul Whelan

Despite older adult community mental health team (CMHT) workers inevitably encountering service users with alcohol use disorders (AUDs), they have a limited evidence base…

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367

Abstract

Purpose

Despite older adult community mental health team (CMHT) workers inevitably encountering service users with alcohol use disorders (AUDs), they have a limited evidence base for working with this group. This paper aims to argue against a wholesale transfer of knowledge and practices from working age adults with dual diagnosis to the older age group.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper aims to address the scant attention given to the needs of older service users with a dual diagnosis by detailing the progress of four older adult service users with AUDs in a CMHT.

Findings

This case study series illuminates some of the clinical and professional dilemmas and challenges encountered when working with this group. Suggestions of how to respond to some of these challenges are provided by focussing on aspects of identification, assessment and treatment.

Originality/value

This paper provides a catalyst to further discussion, debate and publications on the issue of older people misusing alcohol by presenting and reflecting on the issues raised by four practice vignettes.

1 – 10 of 391