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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2022

Fred Awaah, Peter Okebukola, Juma Shabani, Helen Arkorful and Dorcas Adomaa Addo

Students' career choices and programmes of study are perceived to influence student understanding of many courses. Yet, research attention is limited on entrepreneurship education…

Abstract

Purpose

Students' career choices and programmes of study are perceived to influence student understanding of many courses. Yet, research attention is limited on entrepreneurship education that is a panacea for unemployment. Thus, this paper aims to assess the influence of students' career interests on students' comprehension of the entrepreneurship curriculum from a developing economy perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a mixed-method approach and explanatory sequential design is used to collect the data from 575 student studying entrepreneurship course in Ghana.

Findings

The results show that there is no statistically significant relationship between students' career interests and students' comprehension levels in concepts taught in the entrepreneurship curriculum but a statistically significant relationship between students' programme of study and students' comprehension levels in concepts taught in the entrepreneurship curriculum in Ghanaian universities.

Practical implications

The findings imply that the entrepreneurship course should be taught practically. This can be accomplished by creating a virtual enterprise modelled after a successful enterprise. This will help students understand the concepts being taught. Second, students who study different programmes should be taught using different methods. Lastly, students who study non-business-related programmes should be taught using methods that emphasise the basic ideas to aid students' understanding.

Originality/value

This study has made significant contribution by successful adopting the Piaget's cognitive constructivism to the learning of entrepreneurship from a developing country perspective and establish that no statistical relationship exist between students' career interests and students' comprehension levels in entrepreneurship education.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Rose B. Okiy

To report on the bi‐annual national workshop of the Committee of University Librarians of Nigerian Universities, held at the National Universities Commission, Abuja in May 2006.

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Abstract

Purpose

To report on the bi‐annual national workshop of the Committee of University Librarians of Nigerian Universities, held at the National Universities Commission, Abuja in May 2006.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a review of the main events.

Findings

Having serious goals and being poorly under‐funded, University Librarians are beset by conflicts in how to achieve their priorities. This program focused on Quality Assurance as its primary theme with many ideas about how to secure better funding.

Originality/value

Shares the content of papers delivered at this workshop with a greater readership. Collaboration on a national as well as regional and international level may contribute to new ideas that can lend to goal‐setting.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Kingsley Banya

In the past couple of decades, higher education systems have been in transition in sub-Saharan Africa. The phenomenal growth of private, for-profit higher education institutions…

Abstract

In the past couple of decades, higher education systems have been in transition in sub-Saharan Africa. The phenomenal growth of private, for-profit higher education institutions is almost universal. The global trends in higher education have affected the universities in sub-Saharan Africa as well. This chapter critically examines the rapid growth of private universities as a result of globalization and its impact on society. Although the research covers only Anglophone sub-Saharan Africa, the findings have broad implications for the whole of sub-Saharan Africa (Jokivirta, 2006). The chapter is divided into four major parts, namely globalization and the knowledge economy; the evolution of private higher education in the region, using two of the oldest universities as examples; the growth of private universities and the challenges facing them; and the linkages between foreign institutions and local ones. The empirical research on which this chapter is based is part of a longitudinal study, 2001–2006, of higher education in sub-Saharan Africa.

Details

Power, Voice and the Public Good: Schooling and Education in Global Societies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-185-5

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Olatunde Julius Otusanya, Sarah Lauwo, Oluwaseun Joseph Ige and Olunlade Samuel Adelaja

This study aims to contribute to the emerging discourse on elite financial crime, with particular attention devoted to the role played by the legislature in corrupt practices in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to contribute to the emerging discourse on elite financial crime, with particular attention devoted to the role played by the legislature in corrupt practices in Nigeria. Separations of power, watchdog role of legislature and ideologies have become a major influence in democratic system. Legislative power has developed as a means of providing oversight functions over the executives, thereby inhibiting fraudulent practices in governments.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper argues that the political institutional structures embedded with monopoly, discretion and little or no accountability facilitate financial corrupt practices within the legislature. The paper uses publicly available evidence to show that the legislators in developing countries are actively engaged in corrupt practices.

Findings

The evidence provided in this paper shows that separation of power and representative democracy had not brought about transparency and accountability in government activities in Nigeria. Legislature often trade-off their constitutional power and their claim of service to the public interest by engaging in financial criminal practices.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not set out to provide a comprehensive analysis of political corruption. Instead, it considers the “dark” side of legislative practice by examining the involvement of legislature in facilitating corrupt financial practices in Nigeria.

Practical implications

The inability of the regulators to effectively sanction legislators implicated in corrupt practices suggests that the current institutional and regulatory apparatus are not fully equipped in dealing with the financial criminal activities of legislators.

Social implications

Despite the arrest and prosecution of some legislators, a number of cases are swept under the carpet. Therefore, this paper suggests that Nigeria need to reform its political system and institutions to promote transparency and accountability in government and to build trust in the legislative process.

Originality/value

This paper considers the “dark” side of legislative practice by examining the involvement of legislature in facilitating corrupt financial practices in Nigeria.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 January 2023

Fred Awaah

This study aims to present a step-by-step implementation of the culturo–techno-contextual approach (CTCA) in a university classroom to teach industry and competitive analysis in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present a step-by-step implementation of the culturo–techno-contextual approach (CTCA) in a university classroom to teach industry and competitive analysis in the Ghanaian undergraduate entrepreneurship development curriculum. It further investigates the efficacy of the CTCA in breaking difficulties related to the study of industry and competitive analysis as a difficult concept in the Ghanaian entrepreneurship development curriculum. In doing this, the CTCA is compared with the lecture method.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a quantitative approach. A quasi-experimental design is employed to gather data from 215 level 400 (4th-year undergraduate students) entrepreneurship development students at a Ghanaian public university. The experimental group was taught with CTCA, while the control group used the lecture method. The data was collected using the industry and competitive analysis achievement test (ICAAT). As random assignment to experimental and control groups were not possible, the data were subjected to an analysis of covariance approach with pre-test scores added as a covariate.

Findings

The results show that the experimental group significantly outperformed the control group. The results further indicate the efficacy of CTCA in improving undergraduate students’ performance in complex concepts of entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

Researchers usually test alternative teaching methods to break down barriers to study difficulties. The study’s uniqueness stems from the CTCA’s ground-breaking application to the study of entrepreneurship development in a Ghanaian public university.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2023

Jessie Yao Foli, Fred Awaah and Yeboah Solomon

Corporate governance and its training in universities have become an essential addition to the educational curriculum. Despite its expansion, students still need help to grasp…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate governance and its training in universities have become an essential addition to the educational curriculum. Despite its expansion, students still need help to grasp some concepts, affecting their academic performance. This paper examines the expected influence of gender and school libraries on comprehending corporate governance concepts in Ghanaian universities.

Design/methodology/approach

With the culturo-techno-contextual approach (CTCA) as the underlying theory, the study sampled 1050 undergraduate students from the selected Ghanaian public universities. The study adopted a quantitative approach, and the data were analysed using descriptive statistics and ANOVA.

Findings

The results show a statistically significant difference between male and female Ghanaian students in their understanding of corporate governance concepts, with the mean figures suggesting that males slightly understand corporate governance concepts more than females. The results also show a statistically significant difference among Ghanaian students studying using school libraries of varying quality in their understanding of corporate governance.

Originality/value

This study's novelty stems from examining the corporate governance curriculum in a developing country from the perspectives of gender and school library. Adopting the CTCA components in analysing school libraries and gender further evidences the study's novelty.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 37 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2024

Fred Awaah, Munkaila Abdulai and Esther Julia Korkor Attiogbe

The study investigates the comparative efficacy of the culturo-techno-contextual approach (CTCA) and the lecture method in students’ understanding of the human resource management…

Abstract

Purpose

The study investigates the comparative efficacy of the culturo-techno-contextual approach (CTCA) and the lecture method in students’ understanding of the human resource management (HRM) curriculum in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi-experimental design is employed to gather data from 245 4th-year undergraduate students studying HRM at a Ghanaian public university. The experimental group with a population of 115 students was taught with CTCA, whilst the control group with a population of 130 students was taught using the lecture method. The data was collected using the HRM achievement test (HRMAT). The data were analysed using the descriptive analysis of covariance technique with pre-test scores added as a covariate.

Findings

The findings reveal that the experimental group significantly outperformed the control group in the study of HRM, affirming the effectiveness of the CTCA over the lecture method.

Originality/value

This study is novel because it is the first paper to apply the CTCA to the study of HRM in the Ghanaian higher education space. It will, therefore, benefit HRM education in the country when educational stakeholders adopt a sequential and methodical approach to teaching and learning HRM using the CTCA.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2024

Fred Awaah and Sam Kris Hilton

Given the perceived weak corporate governance systems in Ghana, corporate governance education curriculum requires empirical investigations to ascertain factors that can enhance…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the perceived weak corporate governance systems in Ghana, corporate governance education curriculum requires empirical investigations to ascertain factors that can enhance student knowledge in governance systems based on their career interests and programme of study. Therefore, we investigate whether students with a career interest in corporate governance exhibit a significantly different level of comprehension compared to those without such an interest. Furthermore, we explore whether the comprehension of course concepts differs across various business-related programmes, investigating potential variations in understanding among students from diverse programme backgrounds.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a descriptive design, we adopt a quantitative approach and survey method to collect cross-sectional data from 1,050 undergraduate students in selected Ghanaian public universities. We analyse the data using t-test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA).

Findings

We establish no statistically significant difference in comprehension levels of corporate governance concepts between students with a career interest in corporate governance and those with no career interest. However, we find statistically significant differences in the comprehension of corporate governance concepts among students pursuing different business-related programmes.

Practical implications

Our findings imply that the corporate governance course should be taught practically, giving students insights into what the course entails from an industrial viewpoint. This may entail engaging experts from industry as visiting lecturers at intervals to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Students could also benefit from mentorship programmes from industry, internships and related placements to ensure an understanding of theoretical concepts from practical perspectives.

Originality/value

Our study is novel and contributes to extant literature because it is the first empirical study on corporation governance education that emphasizes on students career interests and programme of study from a developing country perspective.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 December 2022

Fred Awaah

The study examines the relationship between the interaction of indigenous–foreign cultures and public employee performance (PEP) in the Ghanaian public sector due to the perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The study examines the relationship between the interaction of indigenous–foreign cultures and public employee performance (PEP) in the Ghanaian public sector due to the perceived unproductive cultures in the public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a quantitative approach, where cross-sectional survey design is used to collect the data from Ghanaian public employees. The analysis is done using correlation and hierarchical regression techniques.

Findings

The results reveal that both indigenous and foreign cultures are pervasive in the Ghanaian public sector, with high power distance and individualism being dominant cultures. Furthermore, while the indigenous cultures have negative significant relationship with PEP, the foreign cultures have positive significant relationship with PEP. The foreign cultures effectively control the relationship between the indigenous cultures and PEP but insignificantly moderate such relationship.

Practical implications

The findings imply that deliberate attempts should be made to encourage the foreign cultures with attractive reward packages to induce workers. This will indirectly control the practice of the inimical cultures and ultimately reduce their negative effect on PEP.

Originality/value

The study contributes significantly to the extant literature by providing empirical evidence of the indigenous–foreign culture fit and PEP from a developing country, Ghana.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2022

Andrew Tetteh, Fred Awaah and Dorcas Addo

This study aims to investigate students’ perceptions regarding the causes and effects of cyberbullying among university students. The study also establishes whether or not there…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate students’ perceptions regarding the causes and effects of cyberbullying among university students. The study also establishes whether or not there would be statistically significant differences among cyberbullying victims, perpetrators, victim-perpetrators and bystanders in their thoughts on the causes and effects of cyberbullying on students’ social lives from a developing country perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses quantitative approach and cross-sectional survey design to collect primary data from 1,374 undergraduate students sampled from selected public universities in Ghana. Descriptive statistics and analysis of variance analyses were carried out using statistical package for the social sciences.

Findings

The study reports popularity among friends, extortion, retaliation, stress, trauma and low self-esteem as causes of cyberbullying. Also, cyberbullying resulted in difficulty trusting people, low self-esteem and increased stress. The study also found statistically significant differences among cyberbullying victims, perpetrators, victim-perpetrators and bystanders in their thoughts on the causes and effects of cyberbullying on students’ social lives.

Practical implications

The study’s findings imply that cyberbullying has some fairly significant negative effects on students’ lives in Ghana and must be taken more seriously. Conditions must be created to ensure that perpetrators and victims are given the support needed to curb this menace. Detailed remediating measures are provided in the study.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the existing literature by studying cyberbullying perceptions among students from a relatively bully-tolerant culture.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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