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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Peter Michl, David Lorenz, Thomas Lützkendorf and Sarah Sayce

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a survey conducted by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) to discuss the extent to which…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a survey conducted by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) to discuss the extent to which qualified valuers have adapted their valuation practices in the light of guidance published by RICS in respect of sustainability and commercial property. The findings are placed within a wider debate between assessment of market value and investment value (worth).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a theoretical discussion incorporating the results from an empirical survey of valuation practitioners.

Findings

The paper reveals that guidance published by RICS in 2011 has achieved limited, but variable, impact in terms of impacting on valuation practice due to a combination of factors including lack of knowledge of the guidance, non-requirement of clients to request sustainability reporting within valuations, paucity of data. It found that where worth (investment value) is required, sustainability factors are more likely to impact the calculation than where an estimate of market value is prepared. The paper identifies theoretical problems and practical barriers hindering an integration of sustainability aspects into valuation practice.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical work was conducted prior to the embedding of guidance within the mandatory provisions of the “Red Book”; the study therefore reports on a direction of travel rather than the current position. The implications for research are the requirement to enhance data capture and to seek ways to break down the barriers to more comprehensive integration of such data so that worth and market values may begin to converge.

Practical implications

The paper has practical implications for both the education of valuers which is proposed through the RenoValue project discussed in the paper and for the RICS in monitoring progress towards more specific integration within valuers’ calculations. Further, the paper identifies that clients and lenders have a key role to play through the instructions given to valuers.

Social implications

There is now widespread recognition that properties which are not resource efficient and which are not equipped to flex to changing occupier needs may not currently be “future proofed” in investment value terms and are likely to see value erosion over time. Further, buildings have a key role in terms of climate change policy. Whilst new buildings can be mandated to meet improved efficiency standards, the ways in which buildings owners can be encouraged to upgrade will be important moving forward. One way is through a value chain response.

Originality/value

The survey is the most comprehensive investigation of valuer’s practice in relation to sustainability and the assessment of market value and worth undertaken. This provides a unique insight into the effectiveness of professional guidance and enables an informed discussion as to appropriate ways to enhance guidance moving forward.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2017

Abstract

Details

International Business Diplomacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-081-5

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2016

Sarah Robinson, Helle Neergaard, Lene Tanggaard and Norris Krueger

The aim of this paper is to contribute to the discussion about the complexity and heterogeneity of entrepreneurship education. In order to achieve this objective, this…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to contribute to the discussion about the complexity and heterogeneity of entrepreneurship education. In order to achieve this objective, this paper combines educational psychology with perspectives from entrepreneurship education research to make explicit educators tacit assumptions in order to understand how these assumptions guide teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Using ethnographic analysis, the paper reports data from the continuous development and implementation of a single course over a period of ten years bringing in the educator’s and the students perspectives on their achievements and course content.

Findings

We find that it is sometimes advantageous to invoke and combine different learning theories and approaches in order to promote entrepreneurial awareness and mindset. It is also necessary to move away from entrepreneurship education as being teacher-led to being more student-centered and focused on experiential and existential lifelong learning practices.

Practical implications

Practically, we make suggestions for the design and delivery of a course that demonstrates how four diverse learning theories can be combined to consolidate entrepreneurial learning in students invoking experiential and curiosity based learning strategies.

Originality/value

There are very few examples of concrete course designs that have been researched longitudinally in-depth using ethnographic methods. Moreover, most courses focus on the post-foundation period, whereas this paper presents a course that is a primer to the entrepreneurial process and exclusively centered on the pre-foundation phase. Rather than building on a single perspective, it combines a range of theories and approaches to create interplay and progression.

Details

Education + Training , vol. 58 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Johann van der Merwe

This paper aims to combine several modes of thought based on systems organization and observing systems in order to construct a model for a “designerly way of thinking”.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to combine several modes of thought based on systems organization and observing systems in order to construct a model for a “designerly way of thinking”.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is to regard design as a “groundless field of knowledge” that may source methodological insights from cybernetics, systems theory, cognitive studies and complexity theory, among others.

Findings

The focus of this research is to model an adaptive frame‐of‐reference that design students may use in order to construct their own autopoietic identity systems. The semantic question “How does a student obtain information about design?” is changed to a structural question “How could students acquire a structure enabling them to operate innovatively in a modern design environment?” With the backing of cybernetic principles, it is apparent that this process is not only feasible but also preferable.

Practical implications

While the practical use that can be made of any design theory is not within the remit of this paper, it is nonetheless the goal of theory to enhance the individual's analytical and communicative skills.

Originality/value

This paper suggests an autopoietic model‐for‐becoming that can have the virtual potential of bringing one to understand the grey areas of human‐object relationships.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 36 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Sedigheh Moghavvemi, Noor Akma Mohd Salleh and Craig Standing

The purpose of this paper is to explore technology acceptance and use behavior of IS innovations by entrepreneurs. To measure the perception of IS innovations by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore technology acceptance and use behavior of IS innovations by entrepreneurs. To measure the perception of IS innovations by entrepreneurs the authors review unified theory of acceptance and use of technology and the entrepreneurial potential model, empirically compare the two models, develop a new model that integrates elements from the two models, and then empirically validate the new model (technology adoption decision and use (TADU)) in a technology acceptance context.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used to test the hypothesis are collected from 1,200 entrepreneurs in Malaysia. The research model was analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that perceived desirability and perceived feasibility have significant effects on entrepreneurs’ intention to adopt and use innovations. Propensity to use is an important factor that has a significant effect on individual behavior. The precipitating events that happen in the time lag between intention and behavior will disrupt entrepreneurs’ inertia and induce a change in their behavior, encouraging them to seek the best opportunity available.

Practical implications

Understanding the individual, technological, and environmental factors that significantly affect IT adoption behavior can support policy makers in providing guidance on the adoption and usage of IT innovations by entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

This study proposes a TADU model with six core determinants of intention and usage – perceived desirability, perceived feasibility, performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence and facilitating conditions and two new moderators, precipitating events and the propensity to act.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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