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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Peter McGough, Susan Kline and Louise Simpson

As the US health system moves to value-based care and aligns payment with quality, the role of the primary care provider (PCP) is becoming ever more important. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

As the US health system moves to value-based care and aligns payment with quality, the role of the primary care provider (PCP) is becoming ever more important. The purpose of this paper is to outline a successful population health and care management strategy depending on accountable teams to standard workflow and agreed upon process and outcome measures in order to achieve the triple aim of improved health, patient experience, and value.

Design/methodology/approach

Two major areas of focus for primary care are ensuring that all patients receive appropriate evidence-based screening and prevention services and coordinating the care of patients with chronic conditions. The former initiative will promote the general health and well-being of patients, while the latter is a key strategy for achieving better outcomes and reducing costs for patients with chronic conditions.

Findings

To achieve these goals while managing a busy practice requires that the authors leverage the PCP by engaging clinical and non-clinical team members in the care of their patient population. It is essential that each team member’s role be clearly defined and ensures they are working at the top of their scope.

Originality/value

This initiative was successful because of the compelling objectives, the buy-in generated by using Lean methodology and engaging the team in the design process, use of multiple feedback mechanisms including stories, dashboards, and patient feedback, and the positive impact on providers, staff, and patients.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2015

Marcin Wolski

We test the determinacy properties of the standard and financial-sector-augmented Taylor rules in a new Keynesian model with a presence of banking activities. We extend…

Abstract

We test the determinacy properties of the standard and financial-sector-augmented Taylor rules in a new Keynesian model with a presence of banking activities. We extend the basic fully rational environment to the setting with heterogeneous expectations. We observe that the benefits from extra financial targeting are limited. Financial targeting, if well designed, can compensate for the improper output-gap targeting through the financial-production channel. The analysis demonstrates however possible threats resulting from the misspecification of the augmented rule. A determinate mix of output-gap and inflation weights can turn indeterminate if compensated by too extreme financial targeting. The results are robust to the presence of heterogeneous expectations.

Details

Monetary Policy in the Context of the Financial Crisis: New Challenges and Lessons
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-779-6

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

Arvydas Jadevicius and Peter van Gool

This study is a practice undertaking examining three main concerns that currently dominate Dutch housing market debate: how long is the cycle, will the current house price…

Abstract

Purpose

This study is a practice undertaking examining three main concerns that currently dominate Dutch housing market debate: how long is the cycle, will the current house price inflation continue and is housing market in a bubble. With national house prices reaching record highs across all major cities, future market prospects became a topic of significant debate among policymakers, investors and the populace.

Design/methodology/approach

A triangulation of well-established academic methods is used to perform investigation. The models include Hodrick-Prescott (HP) filter, volatility autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (ARCH approximation) and right tail augmented Dickey–Fuller (Rtadf) test (bubble screening technique).

Findings

Interestingly, over the years from 1985 to 2019 research period, filtering extracts only one Dutch national housing cycle. This is a somewhat distinct characteristic compared to other advanced Western economies (inter alia the UK and the USA) where markets tend to experience 8- to 10-year gyrations. Volatility and Rtadf test suggest that current house prices in most Dutch cities are in excess of historical averages and statistical thresholds. House price levels in Almere, Amsterdam, The Hague, Groningen, Rotterdam and Utrecht are of particular concern.

Originality/value

Retail investors should therefore be cautious as they are entering the market at the time of elevated housing values. For institutional investors, those investing in long-term, housing in key Dutch metropolitan areas, even if values decline, is still an attractive investment conduit.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research , vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Michael H. McGivern and Steven J. Tvorik

This exploratory study examined the qualitative and quantitative financial measures that best describe the patterns, predictors, or degree of success for vision driven…

Abstract

This exploratory study examined the qualitative and quantitative financial measures that best describe the patterns, predictors, or degree of success for vision driven organizations. A framework was developed within the methodology to qualitatively partition and link the financial contributions of the organizational and strategic factors within visionary organizations. The qualitative measures were identified utilizing content analysis within the literature stream. Five financial indicators were chosen to represent the respective quantitative measures from 57 visionary organizations over a 16‐year period. The inferential test results from two multiple discriminant analyses and verifying MANOVA tests show the accuracy for predicting the level of a visionary organization at 84 percent. The results of this research suggest that group membership, either visionary or average visionary, can be predicted reliably from a set of financial indicators. This research further suggests that organizations can enhance their opportunities for sustained competitive advantage and supernormal profits by focusing on the alignment of ten core elements of vision driven strategies identified from within the research stream.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2010

David Archard and Marit Skivenes

This article addresses the difficult matter of interpreting the best interest principle, and offers advice for those who must make laws, and those who make decisions…

Abstract

This article addresses the difficult matter of interpreting the best interest principle, and offers advice for those who must make laws, and those who make decisions within the constraints of those laws. Our approach rests on an assumption that conclusions about best interest are best reached through a reasoned deliberative process. We suggest that legislators should not write substantive assumptions about what is best for every child into their laws; rather, they should indicate a non‐exhaustive list of key relevant considerations that decision‐makers can review and evaluate in each and every case. Further, the child's own perspective should be imperative in all deliberations about best interest, and a distinction must be made between objective fact and what is invoked as a substantive and contestable assumption. The article supplies a benchmark against which we may review and judge the actual efforts of legislators and decision‐makers to determine what is best for any child.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Nirosh Kuruppu, Fawzi Laswad and Peter Oyelere

Recent research questions whether bankruptcy is the best proxy for assessing going concern since filing for bankruptcy is not synonymous with the invalidity of the going…

Abstract

Recent research questions whether bankruptcy is the best proxy for assessing going concern since filing for bankruptcy is not synonymous with the invalidity of the going concern assumption. Furthermore, in contrast to debtor‐oriented countries such as the USA, liquidation is the most likely outcome of corporate insolvency in creditor‐oriented countries such as the UK, Germany, Australia and New Zealand. This suggests that bankruptcy prediction models have limited use for assessing going concern in creditor‐oriented countries. This study examines the efficacy of a corporate liquidation model and a benchmark bankruptcy prediction model for assessing company liquidation. It finds that the former is more accurate in predicting company liquidations in comparison with the latter. Most importantly, Type 1 errors for the liquidation prediction model are significantly lower than for the bankruptcy prediction model, which indicates its greater efficacy as an analytical tool for assessing going concern. The results also suggest that bankruptcy prediction models might not be appropriate for assessing going concern in countries where the insolvency code is creditor‐oriented.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 18 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Charles Marley

Abstract

Details

Problematising Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-896-8

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2010

Peter Brackenridge

Ibogaine therapy offers a viable alternative to mainstream treatment for opiate addiction. The combination of the addiction‐arresting and fast‐acting properties of…

Abstract

Ibogaine therapy offers a viable alternative to mainstream treatment for opiate addiction. The combination of the addiction‐arresting and fast‐acting properties of ibogaine, with the slow and thoughtful conversation of psychoanalytical psychotherapy is a novel approach to what still remains a difficult condition to overcome.Safer than methadone, ibogaine use is steadily increasing world‐wide, and is becoming a more accepted treatment for opiate addiction. This year it has become a prescription medication in New Zealand. Howard Lotsof, who discovered the anti‐addictive properties of ibogaine 47 years ago, and who died in January 2010, devoted his life to improving access to ibogaine treatment, and instigated the first ibogaine providers' conference in Mexico in 2009.This paper explores the use of ibogaine and psychoanalytic psychotherapy in the clinic for the treatment of opiate dependency, the relationships between the two approaches, and how they differ from other treatment modalities.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Peter Byrne, Cath Jackson and Stephen Lee

The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis that investment decision making in the UK direct property market does not conform to the assumption of economic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis that investment decision making in the UK direct property market does not conform to the assumption of economic rationality underpinning portfolio theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The developing behavioural real estate paradigm is used to challenge the idea that investor “man” is able to perform with economic rationality, specifically with reference to the analysis of the spatial dispersion of the entire UK “investible stock” and “investible locations” against observed spatial patterns of institutional investment. Location quotients are derived, combining different data sets.

Findings

Considerably greater variation in institutional property holdings is found across the UK than would be expected given the economic and stock characteristics of local areas. This appears to provide evidence of irrationality (in the strict traditional economic sense) in the behaviour of institutional investors, with possible herding underpinning levels of investment that cannot be explained otherwise.

Research limitations/implications

Over time a lack of distinction has developed between the cause and effect of comparatively low levels of development and institutional property investment across the regions. A critical examination of decision making and behaviour in practice could break this cycle, and could in turn promote regional economic growth.

Originality/value

The entire “population” of observations is used to demonstrate the relationships between economic theory and investor performance exploring, for the first time, stock and local area characteristics.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Peter F. Colwell and Catherine Jackson

Models of the commercial property market have become increasingly sophisticated in recent years. However, the retail sector and, more specifically, analysis of retail…

Abstract

Models of the commercial property market have become increasingly sophisticated in recent years. However, the retail sector and, more specifically, analysis of retail markets at the local level, have been comparatively neglected. This paper makes inroads into this gap in property research. Retail rental change at the local level is explored, focusing on consumer expenditure as the key determinant of change. The appropriateness of proxy variables is investigated and the mechanisms of rental change are examined. This highlights issues and difficulties unique to local level analysis. Following this, the relationship between rental change and underlying changes in consumer expenditure is investigated. The stability of a panel model of rental change is examined, with differences in market functioning identified across diverse groups of key local retail investment markets. These differences highlight the re‐emergence of northern markets during both the economic decline and recovery phases of the last decade of the 20th century. Rental levels in larger and smaller markets are also seen to respond to changes in consumer expenditure to significantly different degrees, in periods of both decline and recovery.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

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