Search results

1 – 10 of 165
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 October 2020

Peter M. Ralston, Scott B. Keller and Scott J. Grawe

The purpose of the current research seeks to understand what role supply chain (SC) collaboration plays in effectively managing customers of a firm. The research also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current research seeks to understand what role supply chain (SC) collaboration plays in effectively managing customers of a firm. The research also investigates what role industry competitive intensity plays on SC collaboration formation.

Design/methodology/approach

The current research utilizes empirical survey data from professionals whose companies collaborate within a SC. Structural equations modeling is employed to assess the relationship of collaborative process competence on SC collaboration as well as the moderating impact of industry competitive intensity. A further boundary condition is examined with the partner interdependence SC collaboration relationship. Additionally the SC collaboration account management relationship is also investigated.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights on how SC collaboration contributes to focal firm customer account management. Additionally, results suggest that collaborative process competence and its relationship with SC collaboration works differently in the presence of partner interdependence and the moderator of industry competitive intensity.

Research limitations/implications

While the findings help to promote the generalizability of the new research, future research could seek to understand how firms could develop specific account management value propositions through SC collaboration in specific contexts.

Originality/value

The main contributions of the work include empirical analysis of a proposed theoretical model, a better understanding of the role collaborative process competence plays on SC collaboration formation and the discussion of customer account management as an outcome of SC collaboration.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Rose Opengart, Peter M. Ralston and Steve LeMay

The purpose of this paper is to extend the concept of myopia and introduce the concept of labor market myopia (LMM), as well as the role that human resources management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the concept of myopia and introduce the concept of labor market myopia (LMM), as well as the role that human resources management (HRM) plays in its prevention and resolution. LMM, a more specific form of factor market myopia (FMM), is a myopic view of labor needs. LMM is only going to increase as human capital becomes increasingly scarce due to labor shortages.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual review focuses on research on factor market rivalry (FMR) in the supply chain. Using three sample job categories, the concept of myopia is applied toward the human resources context to propose a new term describing a failure to consider future labor needs.

Findings

The authors position HRM/talent management as critical in preventing and addressing LMM at both firm and industry levels and the critical role of labor markets in FMR. HR strategies are suggested to prevent LMM include: expansion of the available workforce; increasing current workforce productivity, economic remedies like paying higher wages and proactively assessing and forecasting the current and future human resource capacity and needs.

Practical implications

Labor needs to be considered as a factor in the same realm of importance as other resources. The HR strategies discussed are key to preventing LMM and improving organizational performance and effectiveness.

Originality/value

The authors argue that organizations not only compete for resources downstream (i.e. customers and markets) but also upstream, such as with human resources. The authors introduced a new concept/term to frame the effect on organizations when supply chain planning and HR strategy do not take labor into consideration. This was accomplished by first narrowing the concept of marketing myopia to FMM, and in this conceptual paper, it was subsequently narrowed to introduce the term LMM.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Scott J. Grawe and Peter M. Ralston

The purpose of this paper is to investigate, using survey data, how a firm may be able to leverage innovation or processes specifically developed for one customer across…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate, using survey data, how a firm may be able to leverage innovation or processes specifically developed for one customer across its entire customer network using on-site, or implanted, employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from a survey of 309 implanted logistics service provider (LSP) representatives are analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings show that intra-organizational task interdependence and face-to-face communication can lead to a greater understanding of firm processes developed for specific customers and greater diffusion of these new processes to other customers. Rather than separating customers that require implanted employees, these implants can be a conduit of valuable information and process enhancements that can positively impact a firm’s customer network.

Originality/value

The current research shows how LSPs can effectively use their customer networks to provide process improvements for multiple customers. Specifically, transferring processes between customers can lead to efficiencies and contribute to supply chain robustness not possible without process diffusion.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Peter M. Ralston, R. Glenn Richey and Scott J. Grawe

The purpose of this paper is to provide scholarly and practical benefits by detailing the past and suggesting a future research agenda for supply chain (SC) collaboration…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide scholarly and practical benefits by detailing the past and suggesting a future research agenda for supply chain (SC) collaboration. A literature review is utilized to examine what has been investigated prior, and what remains to be analyzed, in order to assist today’s managers and researchers. The research expands the understanding of SC collaboration from a focal firm perspective while providing boundaries for future investigation and at the same time detailing the current state of collaboration to practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The current research utilizes a systematic review of the literature to shape a proposed research agenda on the topic of SC collaboration.

Findings

The paper provides insights into gaps in the literature as it pertains to SC collaboration. Specifically, the paper suggests investigating SC collaboration as it relates to perceived and real performance, understanding what know-how and commitment a focal firm must make to SC collaboration, and how to successfully navigate collaboration termination.

Research limitations/implications

This manuscript makes four specific contributions to the literature. First, it provides the first holistic graphic depiction of the central constructs employed in extant SC collaboration research. Next it examines three specific factor areas influencing collaboration. Overlooked issues are then revealed as suggestions for future research in SC collaboration. Finally, the method employed to conduct the systematic literature review can be used as a blueprint for future researchers in performing a similar exercise.

Practical implications

The current research seeks to provide a research agenda which meets the needs of today’s business managers.

Originality/value

The paper provides a suggested research agenda for SC collaboration.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Peter M. Ralston, Scott J. Grawe and Patricia J. Daugherty

The purpose of this manuscript is to assess the impact of logistics salience on logistics capabilities and performance. Specifically, the impact of logistics salience on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this manuscript is to assess the impact of logistics salience on logistics capabilities and performance. Specifically, the impact of logistics salience on logistics innovativeness and logistics service differentiation is measured along with logistics innovativeness and logistics service differentiation effect on logistics performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Conclusions were drawn from survey data gathered from logistics and supply chain managers at US firms. Structural equation modelling was utilized to measure the statistical significance of the hypothesized model paths with all findings meeting the basic requirements of interpretation.

Findings

The results suggest that logistics salience positively impacts both logistics innovativeness and logistics service differentiation. Logistics innovativeness and logistics service differentiation both positively influence logistics performance. These findings give credence to the resource based view of the firm which states that resources lead to capabilities which leads to performance.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions based on the study's results highlight the importance of logistics within firms and indicate that the function must be made salient throughout the firm to further capitalize on the benefits of logistics. These benefits include enhanced logistics capabilities and their eventual impact on logistics performance.

Originality/value

Using the resource based view of the firm as the theoretical framework, the manuscript supports the notion that logistics salience is an important resource for firms looking to provide differentiated services and innovative logistics operations to their customers.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Gideon Jojo Amos

This paper aims to present a systematic review of scholarly articles focused on corporate social responsibility (CSR) in developing countries and published during the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a systematic review of scholarly articles focused on corporate social responsibility (CSR) in developing countries and published during the period 2004 to 2014 in international journals.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applied a bibliometric analysis to 101 articles on CSR research focused on developing countries.

Findings

The study confirms that the most prevalent CSR themes addressed in journals have been social issues, followed by environmental issues in a distant second, with ethics-related issues receiving the least attention. Also, as CSR research in developing countries constitutes an emerging stream of literature, an overwhelming dominance of empirical (qualitative) papers aimed at exploring and/or seeking interpretations to CSR motivations have been confirmed.

Research limitations/implications

An important limitation of this study is in relation to the methods applied. In the first place, this review is based on two electronic databases: ABI/INFORM Global (ProQuest) and Web of Science Core Collection: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED). This means that research published in international journals that are not included in either of these databases will be omitted.

Practical implications

This review provides useful guidance for future CSR research focused on developing countries thereby providing a foundation for future research in this stream of CSR research.

Social implications

The findings of this study suggest that much CSR knowledge in developing countries reflects the unique social issues that call for companies to adopt different CSR interventions when operating in developing countries.

Originality/value

Although this paper is not the first to systematically review CSR research, but it is one of the initial attempts, to the best of the knowledge, to systematically review the state of CSR knowledge in the context of developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 60 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Bill Ralston

In organisations today it is essential that the budgeting process be not just effective in the determination of the allocation of resources, but also be perceived by all…

Abstract

In organisations today it is essential that the budgeting process be not just effective in the determination of the allocation of resources, but also be perceived by all those involved within the organisation to be fair and equitable. The budgeting process must also be participatory, in that, those who will be held accountable for the results are also involved in the determination of the resource allocation.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2016

Eddy S. Ng and Emma Parry

Interest in generational research has garnered a lot of attention, as the workplace is seeing multiple generations (i.e., the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers…

Abstract

Interest in generational research has garnered a lot of attention, as the workplace is seeing multiple generations (i.e., the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials) working side-by-side for the first time. However, it is unclear how multiple generations of workers interact with each other and affect the workplace. Although there is extant literature on generational differences, some scholars have argued that the effect sizes are small and the differences are not meaningful. The focal aim of this chapter is to present the current state of literature on generational research. We present the relevant conceptualizations and theoretical frameworks that establish generational research. We then review evidence from existing research studies to establish the areas of differences that may exist among the different generations. In our review, we identify the issues arising from generational differences that are relevant to human resource management (HRM) practices, including new workforce entrants, aging workers, the changing nature of work and organizations, and leadership development. We conclude with several directions for future research on modernizing workplace policies and practices, ensuring sustainability in current employment models, facilitating future empirical research, and integrating the effects of globalization in generational research.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Audrey E. Schriefer

One of the sessions at the 1995 International Conference featured a panel of scenario experts: Bill Ralston, SRI International (SRI), Robert Wilson, Northeast Consulting…

Abstract

One of the sessions at the 1995 International Conference featured a panel of scenario experts: Bill Ralston, SRI International (SRI), Robert Wilson, Northeast Consulting Resources (NCRI), and Gerald Harris, Global Business Network (GBN). Audrey E. Schriefer, Strategic Management Associates, moderated the session. In the September/October issue of Planning Review, Ms. Schriefer summarized the opening remarks from this session. Here she presents the highlights of the question and answer portion of the discussion.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Rita M. Choy and Lawson K. Savery

Organizations are under pressure to cope with factors such as resource scarcity, increased competition, slow economic growth, increased utilization of technology and an…

Abstract

Organizations are under pressure to cope with factors such as resource scarcity, increased competition, slow economic growth, increased utilization of technology and an increase in acquisitions and/or mergers. All these can lead to downsizing of the workforce. Many organizations believe downsizing can reduce costs and increase competitiveness. However, flattening structures reduces the number of people needed in organizations and such practices escalate the plateauing phenomenon. The present study explores the relationship between job satisfaction, organizational commitment and the plateauing phenomenon. Non‐plateaued workers seem to have a better relationship with their organization and find coaching new staff more rewarding than plateauing workers. This finding is important because trainers must hold positive attitudes toward the company and this seems more likely when the person is not plateaued. Non‐plateaued employees are also more likely to view the organization as encouraging job performance ‐ another issue of importance to managers of organizations.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

1 – 10 of 165