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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2017

Peter Lok

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a neo-liberal nationalist discourse of China imagines the spatial identity of the post-1997 Hong Kong with reference to Lost in

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a neo-liberal nationalist discourse of China imagines the spatial identity of the post-1997 Hong Kong with reference to Lost in Hong Kong, a new Chinese middle-class film in 2015 with successful box office sales.

Design/methodology/approach

Textual analysis with the aid of psychoanalysis, postcolonial studies and semiotics is used to interpret the meaning of the film in this study. The study also utilizes the previous literature reviews about the formation of the Chinese national identity to help analyze the distinct identity of the Chinese middle class today.

Findings

The discussion pinpoints how the new Chinese middle class as neo-liberal nationalists take Hong Kong as a “bizarre national redemptive space”. While Hong Kong is cinematically constructed as such a national other, this paper argues that the Hong Kong in question stands not for itself but in a form of “reverse hallucination” for pacifying the new Chinese middle class’ trauma under the rapid neo-liberalization of China in the 1990s.

Originality/value

This paper shows the new of formation of the Chinese nationalist’s discourse, especially the new Chinese middle-class discourse on Hong Kong after 1997.

Details

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1871-2673

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Peter Lok, Jo Rhodes and Bob Westwood

This study aims to investigate the mediating role of organizational subculture between job satisfaction, organizational commitment (dependent variables) and leadership…

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3160

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the mediating role of organizational subculture between job satisfaction, organizational commitment (dependent variables) and leadership, culture (independent variables) in health care organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey on nurses from 26 wards from various types of hospital was used. A total of 251 usable returns were collected for the analysis (i.e. response rate of 63 per cent). Structural equation analysis was conducted to obtain the best fit model and to determine the direction of the causal effect between job satisfaction and commitment, and the role of subculture as a mediating variable, between commitment of its other antecedents.

Findings

Comparisons with alternative models confirmed satisfaction as an antecedent of commitment and the role of subculture as a mediating variable. The results of this study contribute to the clarification of the causal relations of the antecedents of commitment, and highlight the important role of local leadership and subculture in determining employees' job satisfaction and commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study should not be generalized to other industries and other national cultural context. Furthermore, a longitudinal study may be necessary to determine the causal relationship of variables used in this study.

Practical implications

The findings could provide managers with valuable insight to focus their limited resources on improving the level of organizational commitment via the mediating role of organizational culture.

Originality/value

The research findings provide managers with a new lens to examine organizational culture using the three perspectives of: bureaucratic, supportive, and innovative. Furthermore, the results could renew interest in developing other organizational subculture models that determine the relationship between organizational subculture and commitment

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Peter Lok and John Crawford

This study examined the effects of organisational culture and leadership styles on job satisfaction and organisational commitment in samples of Hong Kong and Australian…

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80473

Abstract

This study examined the effects of organisational culture and leadership styles on job satisfaction and organisational commitment in samples of Hong Kong and Australian managers. Statistically significant differences between the two samples were found for measures of innovative and supportive organizational cultures, job satisfaction and organizational commitment, with the Australian sample having higher mean scores on all these variables. However, differences between the two samples for job satisfaction and commitment were removed after statistically controlling for organizational culture, leadership and respondents' demographic characteristics. For the combined samples, innovative and supportive cultures, and a consideration leadership style, had positive effects on both job satisfaction and commitment, with the effects of an innovative culture on satisfaction and commitment, and the effect of a consideration leadership style on commitment, being stronger in the Australian sample. Also, an “initiating Structure” leadership style had a negative effect on job satisfaction for the combined sample. Participants' level of education was found to have a slight negative effect on satisfaction, and a slight positive effect on commitment. National culture was found to moderate the effect of respondents' age on satisfaction, with the effect being more positive amongst Hong Kong managers.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Peter Lok and John Crawford

Investigates the relationships between employees’ perceptions of organisational culture and subculture, and job satisfaction and commitment. Questionnaires containing the…

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15449

Abstract

Investigates the relationships between employees’ perceptions of organisational culture and subculture, and job satisfaction and commitment. Questionnaires containing the above measures were distributed to nurses employed in seven large hospitals and a total of 251 responses were obtained. Measures of leadership style and employee demographics were also included in the questionnaire. Regression analysis was used to investigate the extent to which nurses’ job satisfaction and commitment to their wards are predicted by their perceptions of the hospitals’ cultures (or organisational culture), the cultures of their wards (or organisation subculture), the leadership styles of their ward managers, and several demographic characteristics including age, experience, education and job tenure. It was found that ward culture was more predictive of commitment than was hospital culture. Also, statistically controlling for job satisfaction did not substantially reduce the influence on commitment of any of the independent variables included in this study. The results suggest that managers may need to focus more on organizational subcultures in generating greater commitment among employees.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Peter Lok and John Crawford

The concept of organizational commitment has been examined extensively in organizational literature, yet the relationships between organizational culture, subculture and…

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33065

Abstract

The concept of organizational commitment has been examined extensively in organizational literature, yet the relationships between organizational culture, subculture and commitment have received little attention so far. Acknowledging the complexity and the multifaceted nature of antecedents involved in organizational commitment, it is still necessary to understand the dynamics of relationships between these variables. It was found that organizational subculture was more strongly related to commitment than was organizational culture. Satisfaction with the level of control over working environment had the highest correlation with the level of commitment. The leadership style variable, consideration, was also relatively strongly related to commitment when compared with other variables. There was a small positive association between age and commitment. However, participants’ level of education, years in position and years of experience failed to show any relationship with commitment.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Peter Lok and John Crawford

Examines the relationship between employees’ responses to the Organizational Diagnosis Questionnaire and ratings of organizational effectiveness in two organizations…

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7017

Abstract

Examines the relationship between employees’ responses to the Organizational Diagnosis Questionnaire and ratings of organizational effectiveness in two organizations. Preziosi’s (1980) Organizational Diagnosis Questionnaire (ODQ), and Steele’s (1987) Organizational Effectiveness Questionnaire (OEQ), were distributed to employees in two Australian companies, and a total of 349 useable responses were obtained. Factor analysis of the ODQ yielded six meaningful factors which were interpreted in terms of the original sub‐scales of the ODQ as proposed by Preziosi. Factor analysis of the OEQ gave rise to two positively correlated effectiveness factors. Cronbach alpha reliability estimates were obtained for each of the original ODQ sub‐scales and for the six sub‐scales derived from the factor analysis of the questionnaire responses. Reliabilities for the two sets of sub‐scales were comparable, but with the factor‐based scales giving slightly higher reliabilities. Comparison of mean scores derived from the two organizations showed that significant differences existed for the organizational effectiveness measures, and for several of the measures derived from the ODQ. Regression analysis showed that the difference in the effectiveness rating of the two organizations can be partially explained in terms of the differences in responses to the ODQ.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Jo Rhodes, Richard Hung, Peter Lok, Bella Ya‐Hui Lien and Chi‐Min Wu

Whilst knowledge transfer is a major strategy for managing contemporary organizations the impact of the key factors influencing the rate of organization knowledge transfer

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8448

Abstract

Purpose

Whilst knowledge transfer is a major strategy for managing contemporary organizations the impact of the key factors influencing the rate of organization knowledge transfer is relatively unknown. As a contribution to this identified gap this paper aims to discuss the influence of particular organizational factors (IT systems, structured learning strategies, innovative organizational culture, and flexible structure and design) on knowledge transfer using a conceptual framework derived from the literature. The effect of both explicit and tacit knowledge transfer on innovative capabilities and organizational performance is to be examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey study, conducted amongst 1,086 high‐tech companies, targeted chief executive officers), CFOs (chief financial officers), COOs (chief operation officers) or top managers/administrators as they provided more reliable environmental and organizational information.

Findings

The study findings, based on a sample response rate of 19.6 per cent, indicated that of the particular organizational factors considered IT systems had the most significant impact on organizational knowledge transfer followed by a structured learning strategy, and an innovative organizational culture. Personalized (tacit) knowledge transfer had a strong influence on innovative capabilities development and process innovation had a greater impact on organizational performance than product innovation.

Originality/value

The findings can be used by managers to more efficiently direct knowledge transfer resource allocation decisions to further optimize organizational performance.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

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363

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Jo Rhodes, Peter Lok, Richard Yu‐Yuan Hung and Shih‐Chieh Fang

The purpose of this paper is to set out to examine the relationships of organizational learning, social capital and the effectiveness of knowledge transfer and perceived…

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5815

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out to examine the relationships of organizational learning, social capital and the effectiveness of knowledge transfer and perceived organisational performance. Integrating organizational learning capability with social capital networks to shape a holistic knowledge sharing and management enterprise framework is a significant strategy to achieve organizational success.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative framework is used to determine the relationships of key variables of organizational learning such as learning intention, shared values, absorption capacity, integration capability, and social capital variables such as network structure, network stability and network relational quality on the effectiveness of knowledge transfer in organizations. In this research, senior management (Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Operating Officer) from 650 firms were randomly sampled and surveyed from the register of the Industrial Technological Research Institute; 111 respondents are used in this study.

Findings

The results indicated that absorption capacity, learning intention and integration capability in organizational learning had the greatest positive relationship with process innovation in knowledge transfer. The findings suggest that organizational learning processes are more important than social capital networks within the integrated knowledge transfer framework and that management could utilize their limited resources better to improve on organizational learning levers for greater effectiveness in knowledge transfer.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the existing gap in empirical work on the relationships of organizational learning, social capital variables and the effectiveness of knowledge transfer. The results of this paper could assist management in strategic decisions in resource allocation particularly in promoting and sustaining knowledge transfer to enhance organizational performance.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Jo Rhodes, Bruce Bergstrom, Peter Lok and Vincent Cheng

The aim of this study is to determine key factors and processes for multinational companies (MNCs) to develop an effective stakeholder engagement and sustainable…

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1405

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to determine key factors and processes for multinational companies (MNCs) to develop an effective stakeholder engagement and sustainable development (SD) framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative multiple-case approach was used. A triangulation method was adopted (interviews, archival documents and observations) to collect data on three global firms (MNCs). Nine senior executives were interviewed for this study (three from each firm). An initial literature review was conducted to explore possible practices and factors (the deductive approach) to SD. Interview data were analysed using Nvivo to obtain appropriate nodes and themes for the framework. A comparison of findings from interview data, archival data, factors, themes and cross cases comparison were used to develop the final conceptual framework (the inductive approach).

Findings

The results suggested that stakeholder engagement is a key mediator between “stakeholder network” (internal and external factors) and outcomes (corporate social responsibility, social capital, shared value and SD). Key internal factors such as human capital/talent, technology, culture, leadership and processes such as collaboration, knowledge sharing and co-creation of value with stakeholders were identified. These internal factors and processes must be integrated and aligned with external factors such as social, political, cultural, environment and NGOs to achieve effective stakeholder engagement.

Originality/value

This study has captured the insight of how MNCs developed their SD strategies. Accessing internal data from MNCs is always a challenge and in-depth qualitative approach is warranted here to obtain underlying strategies, processes and meaning to SD in MNCs.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

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