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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Peter Knight, Karen Peesker and Claudia C. Mich

The purpose of this exploratory study is to investigate the impact of sales education on recent graduates' career preparedness and understand how sales programs might prepare…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory study is to investigate the impact of sales education on recent graduates' career preparedness and understand how sales programs might prepare students better for successful sales careers. We investigate the known competencies leading to sales success that were, or were not, adequately developed by their university sales programs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected and analyzed qualitative data from in-depth interviews with a sample of 20 recent university sales graduates working in a sales career. Over 23 h of interviews were transcribed and analyzed via NVivo. Braun and Clarke’s (2006) framework was applied in this study to code the data.

Findings

The study identifies that while respondents are positive about their overall sales education and feel confident about their knowledge of the sales process, they are not always confident in their ability to deal with ambiguity and the unknown. This study revealed that constructs of self-leadership and career choice self-efficacy deserve further consideration as components of the university sales program curriculum.

Research limitations/implications

As with all exploratory research, there are limits to generalizability; however, this study revealed that the constructs of goal setting, self-leadership and self-knowledge hold promise for further study as a means to increase sales-related self-efficacy and career readiness.

Practical implications

Respondents were positive about their overall sales education experience but identified a need for more effective sales education in cold calling, prospecting and the inherent level of rejection to be prepared for inside sales positions in which sales graduates increasingly start their careers.

Social implications

Lower turnover and better educational preparedness of sales program graduates clearly will accrue socioeconomic benefits.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the impact of sales education on recent graduates’ career preparedness and the first study for this journal to focus on sales as an area of professional competency and related sales pedagogy. Further, the qualitative methodology, which is relatively unique in sales research, provides rich data that is particularly useful for exploratory research to help provide a structure for universities to strengthen their sales programs through targeted training to help students enhance self-leadership and career preparedness.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Wendy Barron, Elaine Gifford, Peter Knight and Helen Rainey

This paper provides an overview of an improvement project that explored whether the implementation of IoRN2, a validated freely available tool designed for any health or social…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides an overview of an improvement project that explored whether the implementation of IoRN2, a validated freely available tool designed for any health or social care professional to use, resulted in improved conversations across professions within an integrated rehabilitative reablement service.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative descriptive evaluative approach was applied underpinned by quality improvement Lean and Total Quality Management (TQM) to capture perceptions, variables and IoRN2 value-add. Professionals' (N = 8) across Nursing, Allied Health Professions, Social Work, Quality Improvement and Support Workers participated in one-to-one semi-structured <1 h interviews. Recurring themes and experiences were identified.

Findings

IoRN2 improved collaborative conversations. The evaluation of the tool demonstrated greatest impact when all professionals were IoRN2 trained. Participants, regardless of profession, believed that their conversations, professional relationships and outcomes improved when using IoRN2. When differing judgments arose with colleagues who were not IoRN2 trained, fear and tension emerged around trust, cultural manners and power play causing disconnects. Incorporating IoRN2 led to psychologically safe environments where trust, confidence and motivation to explore new creative conversations enhanced strength-based outcomes and helped to generate transformational change.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size offered transferable learning worthy of larger future study. The project lead was also the reablement service manager, which may have generated unintended influence.

Originality/value

IoRN2 has the potential to improve how HSC professionals converse, acting as a catalytic tool for system-level integration, transformation and sustainable improvement.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Peter Knight

Sketches a number of issues implicated in the assessment of teaching quality in higher education. Argues that checklist approaches to measuring teaching quality have some limited…

Abstract

Sketches a number of issues implicated in the assessment of teaching quality in higher education. Argues that checklist approaches to measuring teaching quality have some limited value – and a more professional, developmental approach is preferred. However, the focus on teaching quality should not disguise the fact that the emphasis needs to be on enhancing the quality of student learning, and this is not simply a function of the quality of the teaching which they encounter. Discusses implications both for academic departments and for universities, the claim being that systemic action is necessary.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 January 2015

Nishant Kumar and Ali Yakhlef

The aim of this study is to examine how knowledge-intensive born global firms operating in international markets develop and maintain long-term relationships with their customers…

Abstract

The aim of this study is to examine how knowledge-intensive born global firms operating in international markets develop and maintain long-term relationships with their customers that insure their continued growth beyond the initial stage of internationalization. The study adopts a case study approach, focusing on two Indian born global firms operating with the knowledge-based services sector. The study shows that getting to know the customer intimately helps firms to retain customers over long periods of time. Customer-relationship management strategy is in line with the entrepreneurial orientation of the firms under consideration.

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Mr Peter Knight has joined Balzers High Vacuum Ltd, Berkhamsted, as sales engineer, thin films. Responsible to thin films manager Jim Rees, he will handle all UK sales of specific…

Abstract

Mr Peter Knight has joined Balzers High Vacuum Ltd, Berkhamsted, as sales engineer, thin films. Responsible to thin films manager Jim Rees, he will handle all UK sales of specific Balzers thin film products. These include chip resistors, daylight conversion filters, dichroic illumination filters, Calflex heat protection filters, as well as Contraflex anti‐glare panels and large area anti‐reflection coatings.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

Article
Publication date: 18 July 2024

Richard Remedios and Peter Sewell

A range of models of employability implicitly or directly identify potential drivers of motivated behaviour related to engaging in employment-related outcomes whilst acknowledging…

Abstract

Purpose

A range of models of employability implicitly or directly identify potential drivers of motivated behaviour related to engaging in employment-related outcomes whilst acknowledging that employability is also about developing life skills. Motivational theorists suggest that tasks engaged for external purposes, e.g. working towards an employment-related goal, are experienced differently than (those same) tasks engaged in for less external reasons, e.g. the desire for knowledge. Whilst there are excellent examples of the use of motivational theory in some models of employability, sometimes the evidence is either outdated, incorrectly interpreted or fails to use the most appropriate motivational theory. The aim of this paper is to bring to attention several prominent motivational theories and some key evidence that seems most pertinent across models of employability.

Design/methodology/approach

As this was a non-empirical design, the approach did not fit any research design methodology or structured, systematic or meta-analysis review. The paper outlines a series of arguments by reviewing in detail several theories of motivation and mapping them against current models of employability.

Findings

From a theoretical point of perspective, it is suggested that Expectancy Value Theory needs to be considered when creating models of employability. It is also suggested that motivation for employment-related tasks is probably extrinsic, though evidence suggests that forms of extrinsic motivation can also be motivationally adaptive. Several models posit self-efficacy as a driver of motivated behaviour, but the evidence suggests a clear and consistent interactive relationship between subjective task value and self-efficacy, suggesting that self-efficacy is only a useful predictor when value is high.

Practical implications

Whilst the aim of models of employability is to improve our understanding of the predictors of employability behaviours, the practical consequence is the development of appropriate curriculum. Understanding which features of employability create adaptive and maladaptive motivation should help educators create curriculum that produces optimal engagement and performance.

Originality/value

Models of employability are mostly created using bodies of extant evidence. In this paper, we have tried to identify where some of the interpretation of the evidence has been more or less appropriate. We hope that ideas and evidence in this paper will allow theorists, where appropriate, to re-develop their models.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

27809

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Karen Hinett and Peter Knight

Assessment is used for purposes of accountability and the improvement of teaching and learning. In addition, stakeholders such as employers and government funding councils rely on…

2666

Abstract

Assessment is used for purposes of accountability and the improvement of teaching and learning. In addition, stakeholders such as employers and government funding councils rely on assessment to provide them with data ensuring quality of provision and standards of education. Illustrates how these seemingly conflicting demands can be met with reference to three empirical sources: interviews with staff at the University of Central Lancashire, England; and fieldwork conducted at James Madison University (JMU), Virginia, and Alverno College, Milwaukee, USA. Makes a case for assessment which is integrated into the learning experience, responsive to student needs, and which is congruent with the aims of individual programmes and the mission statement of the institution.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Geoff Baker and Debra Henson

This study aims to consider the place of employability in universities, with a focus on research‐intensive institutions, and to outline an initiative that was introduced to…

6610

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to consider the place of employability in universities, with a focus on research‐intensive institutions, and to outline an initiative that was introduced to promote employability skills development at the University of Nottingham.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a discussion of literature on the promotion of employability in higher education, the development of the “Inside Employment” initiative is outlined. The project was developed using an action research methodology.

Findings

The major findings from each cycle are outlined here, demonstrating the different factors that informed the programme's establishment.

Practical implications

The paper makes a number of recommendations for developing opportunities for employability skills development in universities in general, and research‐intensive universities in particular.

Originality/value

The paper will be of value to those involved in developing employability initiatives in higher education, particularly at research‐intensive institutions.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Peter F. Knights

Pareto histograms are commonly used to determine maintenance priorities by ranking equipment failure codes according to their relative cost or downtime contribution. However, such…

2786

Abstract

Pareto histograms are commonly used to determine maintenance priorities by ranking equipment failure codes according to their relative cost or downtime contribution. However, such histograms do not readily enable identification of the dominant variables influencing downtime and repair costs, namely the failure frequency, mean downtime and mean repair cost associated with each failure code. Advances an alternative method for analysing equipment downtime and repair costs using logarithmic (log) scatterplots. By applying limit values, log scatterplots can be divided into four quadrants enabling failures to be classified according to acute or chronic characteristics and facilitating root cause failure analysis. Log scatterplots permit the identification of frequently occurring failures that consume relatively little repair cost or downtime yet cause frequent operational disturbances leading to production losses. In addition, by graphing the trend of failure data over successive time periods, log scatterplots provide a useful visual means of evaluating the performance of maintenance improvement initiatives. Provides examples of the practical application of log scatterplots by a number of mining companies and mining equipment suppliers in Chile.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

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