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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Peter Kennedy, Charles Perrottet and Charles Thomas

Managers need a framework for assessing various kinds of risk and uncertainty that will continue to confront corporate decision makers as the 9/11 event plays out over the…

3641

Abstract

Managers need a framework for assessing various kinds of risk and uncertainty that will continue to confront corporate decision makers as the 9/11 event plays out over the following months and years. The authors suggest an innovative scenario process, one that provides business continuity planning and medium‐term operational planning with a more rigorous analytical grounding, but without overburdening the process with excessive and ultimately counter‐productive complexity. The authors have introduced alternative scenario‐based tools to respond to this specific need for continuity assurance and near‐term operations planning. Case one: business continuity planning (BCP) for the management of one leading global financial services firm committed to a process of identifying and remedying gaps in the recoverability of its key assets. Workshops developed strategies that would close unacceptable asset recovery gaps in two scenarios. Case two: medium term operational planning for a professional services firm in the weeks that followed 9/11 evaluated the plausible range of impacts on their business and operations as the USA and the world took action and terrorist groups responded further. Case three: three years ago the US Coast Guard developed scenarios for very long range strategic planning for their long view project. The Coast Guard developed ten basic strategies from these scenarios. The fourth strategy was “Acquire full maritime domain awareness”. The goal was to give the Coast Guard the ability to acquire, track, and identify in real time any vessel or aircraft entering America’s maritime domain. Maritime domain awareness (MDA) turned out to be highly relevant for USCG decision making both before and after 9/11. Of all the major US federal services involved in the 9/11 response operation, the Coast Guard was singled out for its agility and preparedness.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Alan M. Wilson

The actions of employees such as service personnel are seen as being important in communicating a company’s corporate values and goals, particularly where they interact…

26194

Abstract

The actions of employees such as service personnel are seen as being important in communicating a company’s corporate values and goals, particularly where they interact directly with customers and other corporate audiences. Their beliefs, norms and values derived from the organisational culture influence their actions and the informal messages that they communicate. A mystique still exists around the concept of organisational culture. This paper attempts to rectify this by reviewing the literature relating to organisational culture, focusing on its definition, the factors which influence it and the arguments as to whether it can be managed. The paper highlights the complexity of the phenomenon and the need for corporate marketers to be more sensitive to this complexity in the development and execution of corporate communication strategies. This requires marketers to work more closely with researchers and practitioners working in the fields of organisational behaviour and human resource management.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Rick Roskin

There is a strong link between excellence — a major theme of the 1980s — and corporate culture. This article outlines the requirements of organisations striving for…

Abstract

There is a strong link between excellence — a major theme of the 1980s — and corporate culture. This article outlines the requirements of organisations striving for excellence and how management development programmes can be effective in assisting them.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1994

Bruce E. Beebe and Peter J. Kennedy

Sure there's political instability, high inflation, and vast pockets of poverty. But that hasn't stopped planners from putting plenty of American dollars on the line.

Abstract

Sure there's political instability, high inflation, and vast pockets of poverty. But that hasn't stopped planners from putting plenty of American dollars on the line.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Donald W. Jackson and Stephen S. Tax

The concept of culture has been an important subject of managerialinterest over the past decade, yet little has been written about howculture can be managed within the…

2731

Abstract

The concept of culture has been an important subject of managerial interest over the past decade, yet little has been written about how culture can be managed within the industrial salesforce. Describes the key components of a salesforce culture and explains the characteristics of a well‐managed salesforce culture. Finally, develops suggestions for managing the industrial salesforce culture around three strategic factors: planning, implementation and control. Concludes by providing some guidelines for further research in this important area.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Peter Kennedy and David Kennedy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the elective affinity between sport science and elite football by situating it first, within the wider political economy of…

1161

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the elective affinity between sport science and elite football by situating it first, within the wider political economy of football and second, within the dynamics of the market and work situation faced by elite players in the modern game.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology underpinning this paper continues this movement by considering the impact on market and work situation of elite footballers due to wider social structures and the distribution of social power peculiar to the football industry. It is premised on the view that observed events and contingent relations and processes are linked to more enduring social structures and that knowledge must take account of all three.

Findings

The resulting impact of sport science on elite football is contradictory, facilitating, on the one hand, the development of football as an aesthetic experience, while on the other hand, threatening to transform the football spectacle into a mundane exercise in the search for increased functional peak performance for its own sake.

Research limitations/implications

The value of this paper is that it considers salaries and player power to determine value by exploring the impact on market and work situation of elite footballers set in the context of wider social structures and the distribution of social power peculiar to the football industry.

Practical implications

Elite footballers yield immense power over their market situation, which sport science has the potential to enhance and sustain by fine honing peak fitness. The football club’s relative lack of control of the player’s market situation necessitates the appliance of sport science to help maximize control over the player’s work situation.

Social implications

The paper demonstrates that sport science develops elite footballers to peak fitness, while also developing footballers as commodities; and this latter aspect if taken too far may potentially transform football into a mundane exercise in the search for increased functional peak performance for its own sake.

Originality/value

The paper draws together the relatively neglected analysis of the football labour process with the increasing interventions of sport science to football and sets this within a broader political economy of football.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Peter Kennedy

2106

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Isabel Sánchez Quirós

The organizational literature accepts that when an organization generates commitment among employees through cultural mechanisms, it will be more efficient since the…

Abstract

The organizational literature accepts that when an organization generates commitment among employees through cultural mechanisms, it will be more efficient since the individuals will be involved in the attainment of the organizing objectives and will be motivated to pursue them. It is not clear, however, how organizations can generate this commitment, what constitutes its key characteristics, or what impact its use has on organizational performance. This paper therefore aims to identify the cultural practices that allow organizations to generate commitment, to analyze its impact on organizational performance, and to analyze the degree to which these practices should be used to obtain commitment. The model presented is tested in Spanish hotels, which offer a clear example of the relevance that these sorts of tools can have in the achievement of organizational objectives.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Allan H. Church

Although a large contingency of theory and research has been conducted in the area of individual and interpersonal communication, relatively few theoreticians have focused…

1037

Abstract

Although a large contingency of theory and research has been conducted in the area of individual and interpersonal communication, relatively few theoreticians have focused on the broader character of communication at the organizational level of analysis. With the increasing emphases on total quality, leadership, adaptive cultures, process reengineering, and other organizational change and development efforts, however, the need to understand the process and function of organizational communication at a broader, more systemic level is paramount. The following paper attempts to address this issue by providing: (1) a comparative review and critique of three “classic” theoretical approaches to describing the importance of communication in organizations and the relationship between communication and organizational functioning (open systems theory, the information‐processing perspective, and the communication as culture framework); and (2) a new integrative framework—the CPR model of organizational communication—for conceptualizing and understanding the nature of communication in organizations based on constructs adapted from these three perspectives. The model is then used both in an applied example to help diagnose an organizational system and to stimulate suggestions for future research.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Alan Wilson

The behaviour and attitudes of staff are a key input to a service organization’s identity. However, the quality and effectiveness of service delivery personnel in the…

2196

Abstract

The behaviour and attitudes of staff are a key input to a service organization’s identity. However, the quality and effectiveness of service delivery personnel in the retail banking sector varies significantly from branch to branch. The norms, values and behaviour that make up the corporate culture of the service team may explain the differences. Examines the nature of the relationship between corporate culture and service delivery, based on a programme of empirical research undertaken with 268 staff in 48 branches of a major UK bank. Finds that distinct subcultures exist within the branches, although no direct relationship was found between a branch’s culture and its service delivery performance. With regard to managing a bank’s corporate identity, these findings suggest that the design and control of the corporate behaviour component is possibly far more difficult and complex than is the management of the visual identity component.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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