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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Abby Jingzi Zhou, Peter J. Williamson and Rosalie L. Tung

Abstract

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Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Peter J. Williamson

The purpose of this paper is to re-assess both the nature and sources of the competitive advantages which multinationals expanding from home bases in emerging economies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re-assess both the nature and sources of the competitive advantages which multinationals expanding from home bases in emerging economies (EMNEs) may enjoy in the global market.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the results of 12 concurrent studies undertaken by a group of experts who were asked to examine how strategies for innovation, international value chain configuration and foreign mergers and acquisitions contributed to the competitive advantages of multinationals emerging from Brazil, Russia, India and China (the BRICs), respectively.

Findings

EMNEs do have competitive advantages that can underpin their expansion abroad, but these are mainly “non-traditional” advantages that have been built by finding innovative ways to leverage advantages of their home countries. EMNE’s internationalisation is as much about accessing new resources and knowledge to enable them to extend their competitive advantage, as it is a route to exploiting existing advantages over a larger set of markets. As a result, the global value chain structure of EMNEs tends to be fundamentally different from that chosen by incumbent multinationals.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to EMNEs from the BRIC countries, but implications for EMNEs emerging from other countries are discussed.

Originality/value

We bring to bear extensive data and a systematic approach to understanding the new breed of multinationals emerging from the BRIC countries; their sources of competitive advantage; and how they are using innovation, foreign investment and overseas acquisitions to transform global competition.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 11 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Peter J. Williamson

To explore the implications of the fundamental forces that are reshaping the competitive playing field in Asia and the strategies required to win in the future.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the implications of the fundamental forces that are reshaping the competitive playing field in Asia and the strategies required to win in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is draws on detailed fieldwork and consulting assignments with Asian companies, backed by the author's 20 years of experience working in Asia to analyze the key competitive changes and provide a framework for developing successful strategic responses.

Findings

Four fundamental changes are underway that are reshaping the competitive game in Asia: the demise of asset speculators; the rapid development of China scattering the traditional “flying geese” pattern of development; the breakdown of barriers that traditionally protected Asia's national economic baronies; and the decay of “me‐too” strategies. New strategies are therefore called for.

Practical implications

In the new Asian competitive environment, successful strategies will include the following elements: a new productivity drive; renewed focus on brand building and service quality; reaping more cross‐border synergies and driving industry consolidation; and re‐locating innovation activities into in Asia. Although the mix of these strategic options will vary by business, it will take a different kind of company to succeed Asia's next round of competition.

Originality/value

The paper provides a forward‐looking perspective on how to compete in one of the world's most dynamic regions and lays out the strategic options for companies in the new competitive game that has begun.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

To provide an insight into some of the current thinking and strategies of Chinese companies seeking to play a significant role in global markets, particularly in the West.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide an insight into some of the current thinking and strategies of Chinese companies seeking to play a significant role in global markets, particularly in the West.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds impartial comments, and places the articles in context.

Findings

Chinese businessmen, like their peers throughout the world, face big challenges, huge opportunities and stimulating prospects. The rush of Western businesses to get a piece of the action in that massive country, with its enormous domestic market, is seldom out of the news. We're bombarded with statistics of what quantities of raw materials are (as the headline writers often put it) “being sucked into China” and possibly leading to shortages and the consequently higher prices elsewhere.

Practical implications

Helps Western companies to understand that China, in addition to providing huge opportunities and markets for them, will also provide challenges to their dominant positions.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 11 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

The purpose of this paper is to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

When the twentieth century began, most observers were under no illusions about the growing economic power of the US. They understood that it would eventually overshadow Britain and the other leading west European nations. There seems to be a similar inevitability about the growing power of China; the likelihood is that, well before the end of this century, it will have superseded the US as the world's strongest economy.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2021

Milad T. Jannesari and Sherry E. Sullivan

The continued expansion of organizations outside China's planned economy due to the Belt-and-Road Initiative (BRI) is expected to increase recruitment of self-initiated…

Abstract

Purpose

The continued expansion of organizations outside China's planned economy due to the Belt-and-Road Initiative (BRI) is expected to increase recruitment of self-initiated expatriates (SIEs). Drawing on social capital, motivation and socialization theories, this study examines the experiences of SIEs in China, which is considered one of the most difficult locations for foreigners to work. While previous research has focused on the impact of individual characteristics on adjustment, this study explores the interplay among relationship quality (trust and shared vision), autonomous work motivation, socialization experience and adjustment.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the developed theoretical framework, hypotheses are proposed and tested using data collected by surveying 274 SIEs in China.

Findings

Relationship quality with host country nationals (HCNs) was positively associated with adjustment, and autonomous work motivation fully mediated this relationship. Socialization experience moderated the association between relationship quality and autonomous work motivation. Specifically, SIEs' socialization experience strengthened the associations of trust and shared vision with autonomous work motivation. However, socialization experiences failed to moderate the mediated effects of trust and shared vision on adjustment via autonomous work motivation.

Originality/value

This study answers repeated calls for more research on SIEs' adjustment and SIEs working in non-Western countries, especially China. The findings underscore the importance of studying SIE-HCN work relationships and the theoretical value of autonomous work motivation as an underlying mechanism by which the quality of an SIE's relationship with an HCN colleague influences adjustment.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2021

Ying Zhang, Yuran Li, Mark Frost, Shiyu Rong, Rong Jiang and Edwin T.C. Cheng

This paper aims to examine the critical role played by cultural flow in fostering successful expatriate cross-border transitions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the critical role played by cultural flow in fostering successful expatriate cross-border transitions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop and test a model on the interplay among cultural intelligence, organizational position level, cultural flow direction and expatriate adaptation, using a data set of 387 expatriate on cross-border transitions along the Belt & Road area.

Findings

The authors find that both organizational position level and cultural flow moderate the relationship between cultural intelligence and expatriate adaptation, whereby the relationship is contingent on the interaction of organizational position status and assignment directions between high power distance and low power distance host environments.

Originality/value

Previous research has shown that higher levels of cultural intelligence are positively related to better expatriate adaptation. However, there is a lack of research on the effect of position difference and cultural flow on such relationship. Our study is among the first to examine how the interaction between cultural flow and organizational position level influences the cultural intelligence (CI) and cultural adjustment relationship in cross-cultural transitions.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Xuanya Shi, Francis Boadu and Yifei Du

Both the scope of postentry growth and the scale of postentry growth are essential for Chinese multinational enterprises' aggressive internationalization. Yet, prior…

Abstract

Purpose

Both the scope of postentry growth and the scale of postentry growth are essential for Chinese multinational enterprises' aggressive internationalization. Yet, prior literature has not considered the synergistic approach of postentry growth that seeks the scope of growth and the scale of growth simultaneously. Building upon the embeddedness perspective and the learning view, we address how structural embeddedness directly affects firms' postentry growth in the form of scope and scale and indirectly affects postentry growth via both the scope of growth and the scale of growth. Particularly, we investigate the decreasing mediating effect of the growth's scale on the growth's scope when embeddedness strengthens.

Design/methodology/approach

With a survey data set of 206 Chinese multinational firms from manufacturing and service industries, we conduct structural equation modeling (SEM), partial least squares path modeling (PLS-PM), instantaneous indirect effect assessment and hierarchical linear regression model to test our hypotheses.

Findings

First, Chinese multinational enterprises’ (CMNEs) structural embeddedness is positively related to their scope of postentry growth, while has a U-shaped relationship with their scale of postentry growth. Second, CMNEs' scope of postentry growth mediates the relationship between structural embeddedness and the scale of postentry growth, the mediation effect counts for 33.5% of the over effect. Finally, the indirect effect of structural embeddedness on the scope of postentry growth through the scale of postentry growth is nonlinear. As the structural embeddedness strengthens, the positive indirect effect gradually weakens.

Originality/value

We believe this study further connects core international business research on postentry growth to the fast-growing literature on emerging markets multinational enterprises' internationalization. In addition, we undertake an initial effort in addressing an important gap in the literature: how structural embeddedness matters to firms' postentry growth. Moreover, this study finds important evidence to support the direct and indirect effect of structural embeddedness on postentry growth.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2021

Miaomiao Yin and Bingyu Zhou

The purpose of this research is to reveal how to improve the quality of entrepreneurship by exploring the key factor, opportunity development, impacting the innovation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to reveal how to improve the quality of entrepreneurship by exploring the key factor, opportunity development, impacting the innovation strategy of new ventures. It also introduces political and business ties as moderating variables to reveal the uniqueness of entrepreneurial activities in the Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data from 215 entrepreneurs and top executives in Chinese new ventures were gathered through a survey and the statistical method used is the regression model.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that: (1) new ventures' opportunity creation positively impacts innovation strategy, while opportunity discovery has a curvilinear (inverted U-shape) impact on innovation strategy; (2) the relationship between opportunity development and innovation strategy is moderated by political and business ties.

Originality/value

This research analyzes and compares the effect of opportunity discovery and opportunity creation on new ventures' innovation strategy. This research further offers an in-depth understanding of the influence mechanism between opportunity development and innovation strategy among Chinese new ventures. Further, the results provide practical guidance for new ventures to develop innovation strategies and for Chinese governments to make entrepreneurial policies.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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