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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Rony Dayan, Peter Heisig and Florinda Matos

Knowledge management (KM) and organization strategy are both important to the success of an organization. This study aims to assess the research needs of their interrelationship.

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4844

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge management (KM) and organization strategy are both important to the success of an organization. This study aims to assess the research needs of their interrelationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a collection of over 200 interviews of KM worldwide experts. Their inputs have been categorized based on the frequency of their occurrence.

Findings

This study looked at the research themes recommended by the experts and concluded that KM is to be regarded as a factor for the formulation and implementation of the organization strategy.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of scholars and practitioners interviewed, the analysis approach used and the use of broad questions and dimensions are some of the limitations of this study. Nevertheless, a variety of effects KM has on the formulation and implementation of company strategy has emerged.

Practical implications

Organizations would improve their chances of success in a changing and competitive world by integrating the KM approach, methods and goals within the articulation of their strategy.

Originality/value

This study is original in variety because of the wide demographic sample supplied, and to its involvement both of KM academic experts as well as of practitioners. Its value is in the recommendations on the research of KM and organization strategy that would be of value, not only to organizations looking for ways to make their strategy more effective but also to those willing to implement KM in a better way.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Peter Heisig, Olunifesi Adekunle Suraj, Aino Kianto, Cosmas Kemboi, Gregorio Perez Arrau and Nasser Fathi Easa

This paper aims to examine the views of the global knowledge management (KM) community on the research area of KM and business performance and identify key future research themes.

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4514

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the views of the global knowledge management (KM) community on the research area of KM and business performance and identify key future research themes.

Design/methodology/approach

An interview study spanning 222 informants in 38 countries was launched to collect data on KM expert views concerning the future research needs of the KM field.

Findings

The value contribution of KM requires more research despite experts agreeing on the complexities involved in solving this challenge. Further research areas identified were related to the influence of KM to support business strategy, intellectual capital, decision-making, knowledge sharing, organizational learning, innovation performance, productivity and competitive advantage.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is dominated by European-based KM experts and the self-selecting sampling approach that was used by relying on the networks of each partner could have biased the structure of this sample.

Practical implications

The recognition of the complexity to demonstrate the value contribution of KM could prevent practitioners from using over-simplified approaches and encourage them to use more advanced measurement approaches.

Originality/value

The paper is unique, in that it reports on the views of 222 KM experts from 38 countries representing both academia and practice, on the issue of future research needs in terms of KM and business outcomes. As such it provides valuable guidance for future studies in the KM field and related subjects.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Peter Heisig and Selvi Kannan

This paper aims to review for the first time existing research literature about the role of gender in creating, sharing and using knowledge in organizations and proposes a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review for the first time existing research literature about the role of gender in creating, sharing and using knowledge in organizations and proposes a conceptual framework to guide future research directions.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the systematic literature review method this study collects, synthesizes and analyses articles related to knowledge management (KM) and gender published in online databases by following a pre-defined review protocol. The paper analyses 41 papers published in peer-reviewed journals.

Findings

The role of gender in KM has been rarely addressed in KM journals and journals with specific emphasis on gender. The existing literature is fragmented, but existing research suggests that knowledge sharing might be influenced by gender. Based on the analysis and synthesis, a conceptual framework is proposed to guide further research on determining if gender matters in KM.

Research limitations/implications

Academic researchers should aim to include gender-related variables into their KM research to further explore if gender matters in KM.

Practical implications

The practical implication suggests that managers and knowledge managers should raise awareness about how stereotypes and gendered expectations about role behaviour affect how knowledge and experiences are created and shared within the organization.

Social implications

The authors believe that a better understanding of knowledge handling and gendered role expectations at the workplace could also have an impact beyond organizational boundaries.

Originality/value

The paper presents the first comprehensive systematic literature review of the article published on knowledge creation, sharing and usage and gender and provides a conceptual framework for future research.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Wolfgang Scholl, Christine König, Bertolt Meyer and Peter Heisig

The field of knowledge management (KM) is highly estimated in research and practice but at the same time relatively diffuse and scattered into diverging concepts…

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4253

Abstract

The field of knowledge management (KM) is highly estimated in research and practice but at the same time relatively diffuse and scattered into diverging concepts, perspectives and disciplines. On that background, it was the aim of this delphi study to give more structure to the field of KM and to get an outlook on worthwhile developments for the next ten years. International experts of KM from natural/technical and social/business sciences as well as practicians of KM with a similar background were asked some basic questions onto the future of KM in two rounds. According to the experts, the future of knowledge management lies in a better integration into the common business processes, a concentration on the human‐organization‐interface and a better match of IT‐aspects to human factors whereas IT‐aspects rank low on this agenda. There are no broadly agreed theoretical approaches though something can be gained from the related organizational learning field; in general much more interdisciplinary and empirical research is needed. There are also almost no broadly agreed practical approaches besides communities of practice.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Giustina Secundo, Remy Magnier-Watanabe and Peter Heisig

This study aims to identify and compare the knowledge and information retrieval needs from past projects and for future work among Italian and Japanese engineers…

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1472

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and compare the knowledge and information retrieval needs from past projects and for future work among Italian and Japanese engineers. Engineering work, which is knowledge-intensive, is all the more critical as it both uses and generates knowledge for product and process innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses data collected from engineers in Italy and Japan from an online survey using open-ended questions in their native language. Answers were then translated into English and coded into pre-determined categories; statistical analyses including factor analysis were conducted.

Findings

For knowledge to be retrieved from past work, both Italian and Japanese engineers identified mainly experiential and systemic knowledge assets. For knowledge to be captured for future work, both groups picked experiential as well as conceptual knowledge related to the competitive environment of the firm absent from knowledge needs from past work. Finally, this research uncovered almost twice as fewer meta-categories for knowledge needs to be captured for future work compared to knowledge to be retrieved from past projects, as the former are by nature speculative and, therefore, difficult to foresee.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the engineering domain and to two countries. Further research should extend the scope beyond these two countries.

Practical implications

The study identified information and knowledge needs that could help inform the design of procedures to capture and document engineering work and the development of supporting information systems.

Originality/value

This research contributes to an increased understanding of the substance of information and knowledge needs in a knowledge-intensive environment such as engineering work and product/service development.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Peter Heisig

The purpose of this paper is to look at how knowledge management (KM) has entered into a new phase where consolidation and harmonisation of concepts is required. Some

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8162

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at how knowledge management (KM) has entered into a new phase where consolidation and harmonisation of concepts is required. Some first standards have been published in Europe and Australia in order to foster a common understanding of terms and concepts. The aim of this study was to analyse KM frameworks from research and practice regarding their model elements and try to discover differences and correspondences.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 160 KM frameworks from science, practice, associations and standardization bodies have been collected worldwide. These frameworks have been analysed regarding the use and understanding of the term knowledge, the terms used to describe the knowledge process activities and the factors influencing the success of knowledge management. Quantitative and qualitative content analysis methods have been applied.

Findings

The result shows that despite the wide range of terms used in the KM frameworks an underlying consensus was detected regarding the basic categories used to describe the knowledge management activities and the critical success factors of KM. Nevertheless regarding the core term knowledge there is still a need to develop an improved understanding in research and practice.

Originality/value

The first quantitative and qualitative analysis of 160 KM frameworks from different origin worldwide.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2017

Allam Ahmed

The emergence of “knowledge economies” brings along new lenses to organizational management and behaviour. One of the key concepts at the heart of this new wave is…

Abstract

Purpose

The emergence of “knowledge economies” brings along new lenses to organizational management and behaviour. One of the key concepts at the heart of this new wave is knowledge management (KM). The purpose of this paper is to scrutinize how KM is taught and discussed within the context of business schools around the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The general research question is: how do top 40 business schools in the UK understand, teach and implement KM in their teaching? To answer this question, the author reviewed the curriculums of leading schools and contacted all schools to collect more information and data.

Findings

The study reveals that KM has yet to carve a self-standing place for itself within taught programmes in UK business schools.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s methodological design can explore the relevance of KM as a term, but it can only provide limited perspective into how this complex and multidimensional concept is operationalized in business schools’ curriculums. Moreover, the capacity of business schools to frame KM holistically is beyond the scope of this research.

Practical implications

Framing KM discourse within the relevant academic literature, this paper outlines that, while KM is being scrutinized as a research topic, interest in KM has yet to be translated into a widespread integration of KM as a taught skill within business schools.

Originality/value

The study is considered as one of the first attempts to investigate how KM is understood, taught and implemented in teaching and curriculum design within the UK business schools.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Henri Tapio Inkinen, Aino Kianto and Mika Vanhala

Recent empirical studies have suggested that knowledge-based issues are closely related to companies’ innovation performance. However, the majority of research seems to be…

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3803

Abstract

Purpose

Recent empirical studies have suggested that knowledge-based issues are closely related to companies’ innovation performance. However, the majority of research seems to be focused either on static knowledge assets or knowledge processes such as knowledge creation. The purpose of this paper is to concentrate on the conscious and systematic managerial activities for dealing with knowledge in firms (i.e. knowledge management (KM) practices), which aim at innovation performance improvements through proactive management of knowledge assets. The study explores the impact that KM practices have on innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide empirical evidence on how various KM practices influence innovation performance. The results are based on survey data collected in Finland during fall 2013. The authors use partial least squares to test the hypothesized relationships between KM practices and innovation performance.

Findings

The authors find that firms are capable of supporting innovation performance through strategic management of knowledge and competence, knowledge-based compensation practices, and information technology practices. The authors also point out that some of the studied KM practices are not directly associated with innovation performance.

Originality/value

This study adds to the knowledge-based view of the firm by demonstrating the significance of the management of knowledge for innovation performance. Furthermore, the division of KM practices into ten types and the provision of the validated scales for measuring these add to the general understanding of KM as a field of theory and practice. This study is valuable also from managerial perspective, as it sheds light on the potentially most effective KM practices to improve companies’ innovation performance.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

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31

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

This article aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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596

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The article finds that innovation and knowledge management (KM) are inextricably linked, not least because KM involves an element of sharing. Organizations must pool their resources in order to most effectively harness the potential of new ideas and the commercial opportunities that they offer.

Practical implications

The article provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

1 – 10 of 48