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Article

Lemai Nguyen, Nilmini Wickramasinghe, Bernice Redley, Peter Haddad, Imran Muhammad and Mari Botti

The purpose of this paper is to investigate nurses’ attitudes, perceptions, and reactions to a new point-of-care information system for documenting nursing care.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate nurses’ attitudes, perceptions, and reactions to a new point-of-care information system for documenting nursing care.

Design/methodology/approach

A design science research methodology (DSRM) was used to examine the feasibility and usability of a novel nursing informatics solution in the context of acute hospital care. Data were collected using focus groups and non-participant observations. Analyses were guided by the theoretical lens of actor-network theory (ANT).

Findings

The findings unpack an understanding of the potential value of a new technology, rather than a binary understanding of positive or negative value. Using the ANT lens, the study reveals the dynamics of the nurse-technology relationships and consequent disruptions throughout the translation process. The findings highlight the central role of negotiation in the socio-technical construction of the hybrid actor-network during the implementation of new technology in acute hospital contexts.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies are needed to investigate the dynamics and complexity of the translation process that occurs during technology adoption, reactions of the involved actors to the emerging network and impacts on their role and work process.

Practical implications

Engaging nurses early during development and testing; aligning the new system’s functionality and interface with nurses’ interests and work practices; and supporting changes to clinical work process to enable an effective heterogeneous actor-network to emerge and become stable.

Originality/value

This study presents a novel use of ANT in a DSRM to understand an enterprise-wide system involving nurses and real clinical settings. The emerged actor-network provides insights into the translation process when nurses adapt to using new technology in their work.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

Peter Haddad

The National Library of Australia has a small but interesting collection of rare books and manuscripts. These collections are the legacy of a remarkable period of growth…

Abstract

The National Library of Australia has a small but interesting collection of rare books and manuscripts. These collections are the legacy of a remarkable period of growth in the Library’s history. Strengths are greatest in UK and European materials, particularly from the eighteenth century. The present collecting activities of the library are concentrated on Australian and Asian materials. While very early imprints are now less likely to be collected, the library has a number of collections of scarce and unusual works relating to Asia and the Pacific.

Details

Library Review, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Handbook of Transport Strategy, Policy and Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-0804-4115-3

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Book part

Charles Musselwhite and Hebba Haddad

The population of older people in the ‘western world’ is increasing both in number, as well a percentage of the overall population. Changes in lifestyle as a result of…

Abstract

The population of older people in the ‘western world’ is increasing both in number, as well a percentage of the overall population. Changes in lifestyle as a result of increased longevity and better health and social care mean that older people are being mobile later on in their life than ever before. This qualitative study adopts an iterative and grounded theory approach to eliciting and generating the travel needs of older drivers through in-depth qualitative research with 26 older car drivers and 31 ex-car drivers. The findings suggest three levels of travel needs, these being; practical, psychosocial and aesthetic. At a primary level, practical needs encompass day-to-day, functional and utilitarian travel needs. The secondary level, psychosocial needs, include a sense of control and independence, enhancing status and defining (personal and social) roles. The tertiary level are aesthetic needs, such as travel for pleasure and for enjoyment. Psychosocial and aesthetic needs are less obvious to the participants themselves, but arguably are of equal importance as practical needs. However, less provision is made for older people in meeting these needs when they give-up driving. This has implications for design of travel services for older people: highlighting the importance to place emphasis not only on practical aspects of travel, but also on meeting psychosocial and aesthetic needs.

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Article

Balbir S. Sihag

Sages and seers in ancient India specified dharma, artha, kama and moksha as the four ends of a moral and productive life and emphasised the attainment of a proper balance…

Abstract

Sages and seers in ancient India specified dharma, artha, kama and moksha as the four ends of a moral and productive life and emphasised the attainment of a proper balance between the spiritual health and the material health. However, most of their intellectual energy was directed towards the attainment of moksha, the salvation from birth‐death‐rebirth cycle. Kautilya, on the other hand considered poverty as a living death and concentrated on devising economic policies to achieve salvation from poverty but without compromising with ethical values unless survival of the state was threatened. Kautilya's Arthashastra is unique in emphasising the imperative of economic growth and welfare of all. According to him, if there is no dharma, there is no society. He believed that ethical values pave the way to heaven as well as to prosperity on the earth, that is, have an intrinsic value as well as an instrumental value. He referred the reader to the Vedas and Philosophy for learning moral theory, which sheds light on the distinction between good and bad and moral and immoral actions. He extended the conceptual framework to deal with conflict of interest situations arising from the emerging capitalism. He dedicated his work to Om (symbol of spirituality, God) and Brihaspati and Sukra (political thinkers) implying, perhaps, that his goal was to integrate ethics and economics. It is argued that the level of integration between economics and ethics is significantly higher in Kautilya's Arthashastra than that in Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations or for that matter in the writings of Plato and Aristotle.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Book part

Charles Musselwhite

There are many cognitive training tests purporting to both measure older people’s cognitive performance, several of which come with associated training that are deemed to…

Abstract

There are many cognitive training tests purporting to both measure older people’s cognitive performance, several of which come with associated training that are deemed to improve cognition. This chapter describes cognitive tests that have been claimed to be linked to driver behaviour, and that training on them could improve driver behaviour. Of special interest are tests that could be completed at home on a computer, as it is suggested this could capture many individuals who are worried about attending a driver assessment centre and are not likely to be referred. Findings suggest that UFOV (Useful Field of View) Time Making Trail (A and B) and Dual N have research suggesting that training on them could improve driver performance for older drivers. However, the robustness of the research is debateable. There are also two physiological tests – a neck and shoulder and a general fitness test that also show promising results for improving driver performance. In addition, education and training is purported to improve driver behaviour, but although there is positive feedback from older people who attend and some short-term improvements, research on long-term improvements on driver behaviour are not yet evident. Overall, there are promising results from individual cognitive, physiological tests and from education and training suggesting that reflection on action and feedback from the task is important to improving driver performance but more research is needed.

Details

Transport, Travel and Later Life
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-624-2

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Article

Ashok Ashta, Peter Stokes and Paul Hughes

Within the globalized commercial context, Japanese business activity in India has increased significantly. The purpose of this paper is to highlight common attitudinal…

Abstract

Purpose

Within the globalized commercial context, Japanese business activity in India has increased significantly. The purpose of this paper is to highlight common attitudinal traits that would facilitate orientation of Indian executives towards Japanese management methods through, for instance “reverse adaptation”, using an approach other than cultural dimensions that have emerged in recent decades and consider how these play out in change management contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was undertaken which found significant parallels between traditional Indian philosophy and modern Japanese management methods, inter alia long-term orientation, equanimity and Nemawashi (pre-arranged participative decision making) and shared spiritual dimensions. The paper employed a methodology of participant observation and semi-structured interview approaches contextualized through lived experience methodology (Van Manen, 2015). These events are described and analysed narratively using a blend of qualitative participant observation and reflexive critical incident review.

Findings

The findings, by examining the confluence of Indian and Japanese management, provide an innovative avenue of research and theory for change management.

Research limitations/implications

The research employs an inductive methodology which employs vignettes to examine Indo-Japanese contexts. The limits to generalization are recognized within the study. The paper offers important implications on Indo-Japanese collaboration and change management.

Practical implications

These findings have important practical implications for Indian and Japanese managers who will be able to engage better within the dynamics of the Japanese work environment in Japanese subsidiaries in India. These same insights could also potentially facilitate wider examples of working in Japanese environments, either in Japan or outside Japan. At a more general level, the findings are relevant to all foreign investors in India for enhanced employee engagement by providing insights into spiritual values of Indian managers and their impact on change management situations.

Social implications

There is emerging research on how traditional Indian philosophy tenets can be found in modern (western) management. This paper provides reasons, based in the extant literature, to believe that modern Japanese methods can trace their origin in Buddhist Indian philosophical thought and offer important implications for managing change.

Originality/value

The paper offers in-depth original insights into Indo-Japanese collaborative contexts.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Transport Geography and Spatial Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-615-83253-8

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Article

Damien West and Peter Murphy

The purpose of this paper is to explore the managerial and leadership challenges faced when managing personnel in the retained duty system (RDS) within English fire and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the managerial and leadership challenges faced when managing personnel in the retained duty system (RDS) within English fire and rescue services. It examines the key areas of motivation, commitment, culture, relationships and practical management arrangements.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research, using primary and secondary sources, adopted a deductive approach, incorporating questionnaires, interviews, focus groups and document analysis.

Findings

The research identified issues agreed upon by both employees and managers, and as well as areas of disparity and conflict. It also highlighted matters that appear to be pivotal to the successful management of a RDS, and in particular the importance of how roles are deployed, and managed by senior management, as well as how employees perceive them.

Practical implications

This paper offers recommendations regarding the managerial understanding and appreciation of an RDS as some managers in this research appear to have little or no knowledge of (or indeed a misconception of) key issues in the effective management of the RDS It suggests recommendations for the wider support and engagement of RDS personnel.

Originality/value

This paper offers a contemporary assessment of the challenges faced when managing RDS personnel. While firefighters and whole-time unionised firefighters in particular, have attracted interest from scholars of industrial relations, there has been relatively little academic research from a public management perspective.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article

Takao Maruyama and Susanne Tietze

This paper aims to compare pre‐telework anxieties, expectations and motivators reported by 394 teleworkers with their corresponding actual experiences of telework.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare pre‐telework anxieties, expectations and motivators reported by 394 teleworkers with their corresponding actual experiences of telework.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an organizational survey, 394 samples were generated who had been teleworking for less than 12 months at the time of the survey. By using χ2 tests, comparisons were made between pre‐telework expectations and post‐telework outcomes reported by teleworkers with different characteristics such as gender, job type, the presence of dependent children, and working hours spent at home.

Findings

The study found that prior to adopting telework sampled teleworkers tended to underestimate positive and overestimate negative experience of telework. It further demonstrated some statistically significant differences in pre‐telework expectations and post‐telework outcomes reported by different groups of teleworkers. For example, female teleworkers were more likely to report that telework made it easier to cope with caring responsibilities. Sales and marketing teleworkers were more likely to report reduced visibility and career development.

Practical implications

Implementing and maintaining successful telework schemes requires managers to take heed of the emotional aspects that accompany the use of such flexible work arrangements. Furthermore, career implications and the development of appropriate support structures for teleworkers need to be taken into account.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper lies in the comparative approach between pre‐telework expectations and post‐telework outcomes. It compares different social and occupational groups.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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