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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2018

Lindsey M. Ibañez and Steven H. Lopez

Job loss and long-term unemployment can have pervasive negative impacts on well-being. At its most extreme, unemployment is accompanied by feelings of shame, humiliation…

Abstract

Job loss and long-term unemployment can have pervasive negative impacts on well-being. At its most extreme, unemployment is accompanied by feelings of shame, humiliation, insecurity, and worthlessness, as well as damage to cherished identities and narratives of self. Scholars have investigated how the unemployed attempt to repair these damaged identities, but little is known about how network members participate in the identity reconstruction process. Social support has been shown to ameliorate the negative psychological effects of unemployment, but studies have also found that the unemployed are reluctant to ask for assistance and often perceive network members as a source of stress rather than as a source of support. To understand why social support can be experienced both positively and negatively by the unemployed, we draw upon 84 in-depth qualitative interviews with men and women who experienced unemployment during the extended economic downturn associated with the Great Recession. We find that social support ameliorates unemployment when it bolsters identities important to recipients, and exacerbates unemployment when it undermines such identities. We also show how the unemployed respond to identity-threatening support: by avoiding it, rejecting it, or reframing it as reciprocity. Our analysis contributes new insights into the relationship between social support and identities, as well as a deeper understanding of the noneconomic costs of the slow economic recovery following the Great Recession.

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Race, Identity and Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-501-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Peter Garrett

The wine industry's contribution to the country's gross domestic product is 16.3 billion rand. The total turnover of wine and alcoholic associated beverages amounted to…

Abstract

The wine industry's contribution to the country's gross domestic product is 16.3 billion rand. The total turnover of wine and alcoholic associated beverages amounted to 10.7 billion, of which R3.2 billion was exported. The industry provided direct employment for 257,000 people, and wine tourism for 59,000. There was a significant increase in local excise duty, and overall the standard wine prices increased noticeably during 2004.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Peter Garrett

Update on what is happening in the wine market in South Africa.

Abstract

Update on what is happening in the wine market in South Africa.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Peter Garrett

The ‘Raison d'etre’ for this article is the fact that the area is waking up, in no small way, to its wine, agricultural and tourist potential. It has produced some…

Abstract

The ‘Raison d'etre’ for this article is the fact that the area is waking up, in no small way, to its wine, agricultural and tourist potential. It has produced some identifiable top grade wine for many years, on a ‘Take it or leave it’ basis. It is now interested in customers, but is not yet receiving too many visitors. This part of northwest Italy has always been poor, and has constantly been overrun by raiders since the beginning of apparently recorded history. The area, with which we are dealing, east of the French and south of the Swiss Alps contains beautiful countryside comprising five comparatively large villages and many smaller ones. It is some fifteen miles square, being simply full of hills, in many cases, not more than two miles apart. Each has a castle‐cum‐monastery on its top, evidencing the small self‐defending communities in which these people lived. The elite, which commanded them, could alone afford to drink the wine they produced.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Peter Garrett

This is an update of the article in Number 3 of Volume 4 of the Journal in 1992. The omnipotence of KWV backed by the Afrikaans — led government shielded wine farmers to…

Abstract

This is an update of the article in Number 3 of Volume 4 of the Journal in 1992. The omnipotence of KWV backed by the Afrikaans — led government shielded wine farmers to the extent that they became complacent both before and during the world sanctions. The change of government, downfall of apartheid, and lifting of sanctions all wrought revolutionary changes including a government enquiry into KWV and the wine industry as a whole. Incidentally, export inexperience of many wineries caused errors of judgement in that field. The most widespread was resultant local shortages in spite of previous reassurances to the contrary. The recent worldwide “fruit‐forward” wine style fashion puzzled South African farmers who reacted in various ways and completely out of unison. Nor were they helped by the realisation of the fact that there was widespread vine disease in the country. Nevertheless, exporting volumes quickly surpassed expectation, and consequently the total area under vines began to increase, with many new names entering the industry. The old price control disappeared and market forces began to take control once again. One example of these is the international shortage of red wine, leading to the previously unheard of importation of low priced red wine. Summing up, it is clear that South Africa, the eighth largest of the world's producers, is firmly back in the international wine and spirit market. This is assisted by increasing tourism to the beautiful Cape.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Peter Garrett

The relative popularity of South Africa's leading grape varietals and some blends are discussed from the time vitis vinifera was introduced to the Cape of Good Hope in the…

Abstract

The relative popularity of South Africa's leading grape varietals and some blends are discussed from the time vitis vinifera was introduced to the Cape of Good Hope in the 1650's to the present day. The word ‘Cultivar’ which is sometimes used, is the South African word meaning cultivated variety. These cultivars were almost all French, Spanish and German because of those countries relative proximity to Holland from whence the early settlers had come. Most of the grapes were given local names, and their European identities were, in many cases, not established until the 20th century; during which period South Africa's own hybrid Pinotage was produced. The effects of the sanctions era, and its lifting are examined, and the reasons for popularity changes explored. Some conclusion is attempted relating in part, but by no means wholly, to fashion.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Peter Garrett

Natural wine was not a factor in South Africa until after 1935. However, the hybrid Pinotage was produced in the 1920's and the now quasi government KWV representing wine…

Abstract

Natural wine was not a factor in South Africa until after 1935. However, the hybrid Pinotage was produced in the 1920's and the now quasi government KWV representing wine farmers, was far reachingly empowered to fix the price of distilling wine. South Africa is traditionally a national brandy and beer drinking nation, and that largely stands today. The monopolistic KWV backed by the Afrikaaner government since 1948 has continuously increased its hold as a stabilising force. In reply the producing wholesalers have merged from many into four very large firms of which SFW is by far the biggest. Even the two largest of those were controlled by one firm until joined by KWV, their long term adversary, which took a thirty percent interest SFW's vision of natural wine being more healthy than spirits has been its theme from the time of its founder W.C. Winshaw in 1935. This is demonstrated in many ways. The new South African government, no longer Afrikaaner led, has set up a competition's board enquiry which is almost certainly destined to change completely, the face of the whole SA wine and spirits industry. The purpose of this paper is to set on record the old regime, and Stellenbosch Fanner's part therein as a matter of record and learning.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Peter Garrett

Describes South Africa's viticultural background to illustrate the shape of that industry's present marketing picture in the light of diminishing anctions and the…

Abstract

Describes South Africa's viticultural background to illustrate the shape of that industry's present marketing picture in the light of diminishing anctions and the country's present socio‐economic changes — being out of the international market for such a long time has had interesting effects on the whole of the South African market.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Peter Garrett

This is intended to be the first of a series studying the way in which a small number of people have had a compelling effect upon the South African Wine Industry. John…

Abstract

This is intended to be the first of a series studying the way in which a small number of people have had a compelling effect upon the South African Wine Industry. John Platter's annual production of his South African Wine Guide since 1980, with tasting and other notes on every South African wine known to be available, as well as a host of technical and statistical data, has penetrated the whole industry.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Peter Garrett

This article studies the planning and creation of a substantial wine farm in South Africa. A prominent businessman uses his managerial talents in copy‐book fashion, to…

Abstract

This article studies the planning and creation of a substantial wine farm in South Africa. A prominent businessman uses his managerial talents in copy‐book fashion, to attract earlier return (on his considerable outlay) than would have been the case relying fully upon the maturity of his vine crop. An enormous bush‐fire had an unexpected effect, and the variation of wildlife is touched upon, as are the inevitable government regulations. There is so much being, and to be, installed, that it is suggested a follow‐up study concerning maturity and achievements could be useful.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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