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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

Martin Evans, Peter Farrell, Emad Elbeltagi and Helen Dion

Built environment organisations face global challenges between business units, especially since the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has profoundly disrupted the…

Abstract

Purpose

Built environment organisations face global challenges between business units, especially since the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has profoundly disrupted the construction industry worldwide, including the management of construction megaprojects (CMPs). This research aims to develop a competency framework, for global integrated delivery (GID) transformative initiatives and future of work (FOW) global initiatives, to manage integration between lean construction (LC) practices and integrated project delivery (IPD) on CMPs in contemporary multinational engineering organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

“Mixed research methods” involves a two-stage quantitative and qualitative research approach. In the context of CMPs, stage one consisted of a qualitative research methodology comprising a literature review to examine competencies, COVID-19 impacts, responses and key drivers (KDs) to integrate LeanIPD&GID; stage one outcomes propose a conceptualisation of LeanIPD&GID, a competency framework and future of work (FOW) global initiatives. Stage two involved an empirical questionnaire survey for a set of 30 KDs arranged into five-factor clusters (FCs), 226 respondents from 23 countries with an extensive cosmopolitan experience; analysis adopted structural equation modelling (SEM), descriptive and inferential statistics, percentage scoring analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) and eigenvalues.

Findings

In the context of CMPs, stage one outcomes delivered a conceptualisation of LeanIPD&GID, a proposed competency framework and FOW global initiatives. Stage two concluded that the most significant KDs are “collaboration in design, construction works and engineering management,” “coordination and planning of construction work,” “senior organisational management support,” “boosting implementation of LC, and integrating project delivery” and “earlier and precise 3D visualisation of designs”. building information modelling (BIM) adoption in the MENA region is higher than LC; the second is still taking its first steps, while IPD has little implementation. LeanBIM is slightly integrated, while LeanIPD integration is almost not present.

Originality/value

The research findings, conceptualised LeanIPD&GID principles, a proposed competency framework and FOW global initiatives, provided future research streams and directions; the study has provided a competency framework and FOW global initiatives for effective practical strategies for enhancing integration of LeanIPD&GID transformative initiatives on CMPs and will allow project key stakeholders to place emphasis on boosting LeanIPD&GID KDs.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Martin Evans, Peter Farrell, Emad Elbeltagi and Helen Dion

The architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry encounter substantial risks and challenges in its evolution towards sustainable development. International…

Abstract

Purpose

The architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry encounter substantial risks and challenges in its evolution towards sustainable development. International businesses, multinational AEC organisations, technical professionals, project and portfolio management organisations face global connectivity challenges between business units, especially during the outbreak of novel coronavirus pandemic, to manage construction megaprojects (CMPs). That raises the need to manage global connectivity as a main strategic goal of global organisations. This paper aims to investigate barriers to integrating lean construction (LC) practices and integrated project delivery (IPD) on CMPs towards the global integrated delivery (GID) transformative initiatives and develop future of work (FOW) global initiatives in contemporary multinational AEC organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage quantitative and qualitative research approach is adopted. The qualitative research methodology consists of a literature review to appraise barriers to integrating LeanIPD&GID on CMPs. Barriers are arranged into six-factor clusters (FCs), with a conceptualisation of LeanIPD&GID, GID strategy placements and FOW global initiatives with multiple validations. This analysis also involved semi-structured interviews and focus group techniques. Stage two consisted of an empirical questionnaire survey that shaped the foundation of analysis and findings of 230 respondents from 23 countries with extensive cosmopolitan experience in the construction of megaprojects. The survey examined a set of 28 barriers to integrating LeanIPD&GID on CMPs resulting from a detailed analysis of extant literature after validation. Descriptive and inferential statistical tests were exploited for data analysis, percentage scoring analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) and eigenvalues were used to elaborate on clustered factors.

Findings

The research conceptualised LeanIPD&GID principles and proposed GID strategy placements for LeanIPD&GID transformative initiatives and FOW global initiatives. It concluded that the most significant barriers to integration of LeanIPD&GID on CMPs are “lack of mandatory building information modelling (BIM) and LC industry standards and regulations by governments”, “lack of involvement and support of governments”, “high costs of BIM software licenses”, “resistance of industry to change from traditional working practices” and “high initial investment in staff training costs of BIM”. PCA revealed the most significant FCs are “education and knowledge-related barriers”, “project objectives-related barriers” and “attitude-related barriers”. Awareness of BIM in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region is higher than LC and LC awareness is higher than IPD knowledge. Whilst BIM adoption in the MENA region is higher than LC; the second is still taking its first steps, whilst IPD has little implementation. LeanBIM is slightly integrated, whilst LeanIPD integration is almost not present.

Originality/value

The research findings, conclusion and recommendation and proposed GID strategy placements for LeanIPD&GID transformative initiatives to integrating LeanIPD&GID on CMPs. This will allow project key stakeholders to place emphasis on tackling LeanIPD&GID barriers identified in this research and commence GID strategies. The study has provided effective practical strategies for enhancing the integration of LeanIPD&GID transformative initiatives on CMPs.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2021

Martin Evans, Peter Farrell, Wael Zewein and Ayman Mashali

The construction industry encounters substantial challenges in its evolution towards sustainable development and to the adoption of building information modelling (BIM…

Abstract

Purpose

The construction industry encounters substantial challenges in its evolution towards sustainable development and to the adoption of building information modelling (BIM) technology and lean construction (LC) practices on construction mega-projects. This study aims to present critical challenges and to investigate the interactions of BIM and LC on construction mega-projects encountered by key stakeholders in their efforts to integrate BIM and LC.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach is adopted to introduce and validate LC principles and BIM functionalities resulting from a detailed analysis of extant literature, followed by a conceptual analysis of the interactions between BIM and LC on construction mega-projects. A quantitative questionnaire survey is then used. Descriptive and inferential statistical tests are used for data analysis, and analysis of variance tests elaborate and validate results.

Findings

The research yielded ten BIM functionalities and ten LC principles, which are categorised in four principle areas and four BIM functionality groups. A research framework for analysis of the interaction between BIM and LC is then compiled.

Originality/value

Research findings and the proposed framework will enhance the adoption of BIM and LC practices on construction mega-projects and allow project key stakeholders to place emphasis on tackling crucial challenges and barriers identified in this research. The framework will guide and stimulate research; and as such, the approach adopted up to this point is constructive. The identified interactions between BIM and LC on construction mega-projects show positive synergies between the two.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2020

Martin Evans and Peter Farrell

The construction industry encounters substantial challenges in its evolution towards sustainable development and in the adoption of building information modelling (BIM…

Abstract

Purpose

The construction industry encounters substantial challenges in its evolution towards sustainable development and in the adoption of building information modelling (BIM) technology and lean construction (LC) practices on construction mega-projects. This research aims to investigate the critical barriers encountered by key construction stakeholders in their efforts to integrate BIM and LC in the construction mega-projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-round Delphi survey shaped the foundation of aggregating consensus between an expert panel that examined a set of 28 barriers resulting from a detailed analysis of the extant literature. Descriptive and inferential statistical tests were exploited for data analysis, and interrater agreement analysis was used to elaborated and validate results.

Findings

The research concluded that the key barriers by descending order of significance are lack of mandatory BIM and LC industry standards and regulations by the government, resistance of the industry to change from traditional practices to LeanBIM, high cost of software licenses and training and running of BIM.

Originality/value

The research findings and the proposed mitigation strategy will enhance the application of BIM and LC practices in construction mega-projects and allow project key stakeholders to place emphasis on tackling the crucial challenges and barriers identified in this research.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

Akponanabofa Henry Oti, Peter Farrell, Abbes Berrais, Paul McMahon, Mostapha Boulbibane, Spyridon Paschalis, Yassin Osman, Furat AL-Faraj and Malcolm Duncan

In line with business goals of customer satisfaction, higher education institutions of learning consider excellent student experience a priority. Teaching and learning are…

Abstract

Purpose

In line with business goals of customer satisfaction, higher education institutions of learning consider excellent student experience a priority. Teaching and learning are important aspects of satisfaction that are monitored annually by universities using tools such as the National Student Survey (NSS). The NSS results are useful for educational planning and informing consumer choices. This research measured undergraduate student experiences on an interdisciplinary project using the NSS framework. Hinged on diversity, the purpose was to investigate whether full-time (FT), part-time (PT) and degree apprenticeship students with varied work experience enhance their learning studying together on an interdisciplinary project.

Design/methodology/approach

This research has measured, using the NSS criteria, student experiences on an interdisciplinary project on a civil engineering programme. It benchmarks the quality of learning and student understanding and perceptions of learning. The method is based upon a literature review and questionnaire survey of students.

Findings

Results indicate good amounts of peer influence on learning in a simulated interdisciplinary team setting supported by a mix of diverse work experience in students’ background.

Originality/value

Sections of the NSS are extended with additional questions to capture the impact that FT, PT and degree apprenticeship study modes, closely associated with students’ background of job experience, have on teaching and learning.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Akponanabofa Henry Oti, Peter Farrell, Fonbeyin Henry Abanda, Paul McMahon, Abdul-Majeed Mahamadu, Dingayo Mzyece, Adeyemi Ayodele Akintola and Nawal Prinja

The relatively low capital cost and contributions to mitigating global warming have favoured the continuous construction and operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs…

Abstract

Purpose

The relatively low capital cost and contributions to mitigating global warming have favoured the continuous construction and operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) across the world. One critical phase in the operation of nuclear plants for ensuring the safety and security of radioactive products and by-products is decommissioning. With the advent of digital twinning in the building information modelling (BIM) methodology, efficiency and safety can be improved from context-focus access to regulations pertaining to demolition of structures and the cleaning-up of radioactivity inherent in nuclear stations. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to propose a BIM-driven framework to achieve a more regulation-aware and safer decommissioning of nuclear power plants.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework considers task requirements, and landscape and environmental factors in modelling demolition scenarios that characterise decommissioning processes. The framework integrates decommissioning rules/regulations in a BIM linked non-structured query system to model items and decommissioning tasks, which are implemented based on context-focussed retrieval of decommissioning rules and regulations. The concept’s efficacy is demonstrated using example cases of digitalised NPPs.

Findings

This approach contributes to enhancing improvements in nuclear plant decommissioning with potential for appropriate activity sequencing, risk reduction and ensuring safety.

Originality/value

A BIM-driven framework hinged on querying non-structured databases to provide context-focussed access to nuclear rules and regulations and to aiding decommissioning is new.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

Martin Evans, Peter Farrell, Ayman Mashali and Wael Zewein

The purpose of this paper is to investigate critical success factors (CSFs) that enhance integration between building information modelling (BIM) and lean construction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate critical success factors (CSFs) that enhance integration between building information modelling (BIM) and lean construction (LC) practices on construction mega-projects. BIM and LC have gained momentum in the past decade.

Design/methodology/approach

The Delphi survey technique was used to gauge opinions of a panel of 16 experts through a two-round Delphi questionnaire survey. Panel responses were scrutinised using inferential and descriptive statistical techniques.

Findings

In total, 30 CSFs were identified in the literature. The top ranked factor out of 30 that supports LeanBIM synergy was “collaboration in design, construction works and engineering management”. Other top rated CSFs were centric on people, data and technology elements. The research findings are important for project stakeholders, organisations, contractors, engineers and local authorities who implement LC and BIM synergies in construction mega-projects.

Originality/value

The research findings are important for project stakeholders, organisations, contractors, engineers and local authorities who implement LC and BIM synergies in construction mega-projects. The research recommends further hands-on training to increase the integration of BIM and LC practices in the architecture, engineering and construction industry and to enrich the extant body of knowledge in construction of mega-projects.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2019

Katherine Ibbotson and Peter Farrell

Low carbon solutions in infrastructure have been well documented and promoted in most areas of the UK except in the context of public sector Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk…

Abstract

Purpose

Low carbon solutions in infrastructure have been well documented and promoted in most areas of the UK except in the context of public sector Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management (FCERM) infrastructure. With the UK Government providing £2.5bn capital investment to reduce risk of flooding and coastal erosion between 2015 and 2020, the carbon impact of this construction programme will have a significant impact on the UK’s carbon targets. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive literature review focusing on the effect of carbon on climate change, the role of UK public sector FCERM construction and organisational cultural challenges in promoting low carbon.

Design/methodology/approach

An electronic survey of practising professionals in a leading government agency that procures major FCERM construction projects has been undertaken. The survey covers participants from the whole value chain within the project life cycle, since many authoritative sources call for integration, and for change to be implemented in partner organisations.

Findings

The survey shows that although carbon is considered, it is not yet at the level of importance nor is it prioritised to the extent at which cost is. This is for both public and private sector supply chain organisations. Low carbon, although included in discussions, does not feature as prominently throughout all project stages.

Research limitations/implications

The utilisation of a survey for this research is limited as it merely supports current industry findings, albeit having focused on a specific infrastructure area. Further qualitative research is required to fully explore the findings within the survey, and to establish whether the implementation of a new whole life carbon calculator within FCERM construction will have an impact on the organisational culture and future successful implementation of low carbon construction.

Practical implications

The results of this research identify the specific areas in which industry practitioners involved in promoting and prioritising low carbon could focus on to facilitate the change required to fully embed low carbon into FCERM construction.

Social implications

This research supports industry knowledge specifically for public sector FCERM construction, and the changes to organisational culture required to fully embed low carbon solutions in public sector construction. These changes may have an impact on the amount of carbon being used, which can positively affect climate change as a whole.

Originality/value

The literature review shows that carbon has a clear impact on climate change, and organisational culture and leadership can facilitate the successful implementation of new initiatives. However, previous attempts to embed low carbon into infrastructure construction practice have had limited success to date. The survey findings support the view that organisational culture and leadership can influence the successful embedding of low carbon solutions, and why this has been a challenge.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2020

Amin Khalifeh, Peter Farrell, Mohammad Alrousan, Shaima Alwardat and Masar Faisal

The paper aims to present a conceptual framework that helps in incorporating sustainability into software projects, highlights the importance of project sustainability and…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to present a conceptual framework that helps in incorporating sustainability into software projects, highlights the importance of project sustainability and provides an extensive review of recent relevant contributions across various fields.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out a systematic bibliographic search on relevant published materials to analyse links between the two disciplines (sustainability and software projects). Furthermore, content analysis was applied to the final selected publications to identify and classify relevant triple bottom line (TBL) aspects to develop the framework.

Findings

The inclusion of TBL-related aspects is the most efficient and effective method used to incorporate sustainability into projects. Most of the relevant contributions in the software literature have focussed on either project product or project process or on one or two dimensions of sustainability rather than the three dimensions of the TBL theory. This study contributes by proposing a conceptual framework that encompasses TBL-related aspects for incorporating sustainability into processes and products of software projects.

Research limitations/implications

Validating the proposed framework empirically could be an interesting research issue. In addition, future works may focus on different types of industries, such as information systems, telecommunications and service sectors, which have seldom been studied in the literature.

Practical implications

Software companies – or other relevant organisations – may use the proposed framework as a measurement tool to evaluate the environmental and social impacts of their current products and project management practices. Consequently, these organisations may pay more attention to incorporating sustainability into their project management practices.

Originality/value

The proposed framework may contribute towards a more sustainable orientation by providing a unique combination of TBL-related aspects that gives academics and practitioners a better understanding of how software projects can be managed sustainably.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2020

Amin Khalifeh, Peter Farrell and Malek Al-edenat

The purpose of this paper is to answer the research question: “does the incorporation of sustainability as a new school of thought in project management support project…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the research question: “does the incorporation of sustainability as a new school of thought in project management support project success?” The authors carried out a systematic literature review (SLR) on relevant empirical studies before 2018 to answer this question.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out an SLR by selecting, extracting, analysing and critically appraising relevant literature that met pre-specified criteria by using transparent, well-organised and replicable steps. The main sources are publications in peer-reviewed journals regardless of their impact factor because the topic of incorporating sustainability in project management practices is restrained by a lack of research.

Findings

Based on the analysis, it seems that incorporating sustainability into project management may support project success. However, more evidence is required to support this finding as there are too few relevant empirical studies in the literature.

Research limitations/implications

Therefore, considering sustainability as a new school of thought in project management is premature, and there are recommendations for further research at the end of this study. There are several limitations to the studies chosen, which may have significantly affected results, and thus may affect outcomes in this study.

Originality/value

Project success needs to be the main endeavour when incorporating sustainability into project management, and it should be a key criterion when considering sustainability as a new school of thought in managing projects. The most challenging elements of project success that need to be addressed are cost and time. This study contributes to a better understanding of the impact of PSM on project success. It facilitates decision making in considering sustainability as a new school of thought in project management. Furthermore, it defines a need for more research work in this potential paradigm shift in managing projects.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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