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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Thomas Richardson, Peter Elliott and Ron Roberts

Previous cross-sectional research has examined the effect of loneliness on mental health. The purpose of this paper is to examine longitudinal relationships in students.

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Abstract

Purpose

Previous cross-sectional research has examined the effect of loneliness on mental health. The purpose of this paper is to examine longitudinal relationships in students.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 454 British undergraduate students completed measures of loneliness and mental health at four time points.

Findings

After controlling for demographics and baseline mental health, greater loneliness predicted greater anxiety, stress, depression and general mental health over time. There was no evidence that mental health problems increased loneliness over time. There was no relationship with alcohol problems. Baseline loneliness predicted greater eating disorder risk at follow-up and vice versa.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by a relatively small and heavily female sample.

Practical implications

Social and psychological interventions to reduce loneliness in university settings may improve mental health.

Social implications

Universities should consider organising social activities to mitigate feelings of loneliness in students.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature as a longitudinal analysis showing that loneliness exacerbates poor mental health over time. This also adds to the literature for students specifically, and suggests a possible bi-directional relationship between eating disorders and loneliness for the first time.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2018

Thomas Richardson, Mma Yeebo, Megan Jansen, Peter Elliott and Ron Roberts

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether financial variables impact psychosis risk over time in students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether financial variables impact psychosis risk over time in students.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 408 first-year British undergraduate students completed measures assessing psychosis risk and finances at three time points.

Findings

Greater financial difficulties increased psychosis risk cross sectionally both in terms of symptoms and distress. Other financial variables such as student loan amount were not significant. In longitudinal analysis financial difficulties increase psychotic symptoms and distress over time, but there was no impact of psychotic symptoms on later financial difficulties.

Research limitations/implications

The study used a relatively small and heavily female sample. Future research is needed to confirm the findings.

Practical implications

Whilst amount of debt does not appear to impact psychotic symptoms in students, greater financial difficulties appear to increase the risk of psychosis over time. Professionals working with students should be aware of this potential link.

Originality/value

This is the first time a longitudinal study has examined the effect of finances on psychosis symptoms.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2018

David Wadley, Jung Hoon Han and Peter Elliott

Professionals’ market knowledge and business experience can facilitate transactions of residential property potentially impacted by stigmatised installations, such as…

Abstract

Purpose

Professionals’ market knowledge and business experience can facilitate transactions of residential property potentially impacted by stigmatised installations, such as large-scale public infrastructure. The purpose of this paper is to explore perceptions and assessments among homeowners, valuers (appraisers) and real estate agents (realtors) regarding infrastructure in general and high voltage overhead transmission lines (HVOTLs) in particular.

Design/methodology/approach

Informed by a literature review, separate surveys in Queensland, Australia, analyse via non-parametric and parametric means informational and perceptual variables concerning HVOTLs among 600 homeowners, 90 valuers and 90 real estate agents.

Findings

The findings reveal statistically significant differences in risk and valuation perceptions of homeowners, valuers and real estate agents relating to the placement of major linear forms of infrastructure.

Research limitations/implications

This study adds to a now-solid body of literature pertaining to property effects of HVOTLs. It extends the analysis among classes of real estate professionals and provides new comparisons for further analysis and commentary.

Practical implications

The results speak to property professionals, land use planning and electricity authorities. Prior research can be triangulated with that obtained here from valuers and real estate agents who act as informants, gatekeepers and confidants in the market place. Various hypotheses address specific points of professional practice.

Social implications

This study shows that property professionals’ disposition to HVOTLs and other large-scale infrastructure is likely to be a good deal more measured than that of homeowners, so that valuers and real estate agents might exercise a mediating influence in placement and installations decisions.

Originality/value

This research raises understanding of differences in market knowledge and perception of essential infrastructure among clients and property agents. As a point of difference, it concentrates on examining empirically what texts refer to as “information asymmetry” in residential real estate markets.

Details

Property Management, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Clive M.J. Warren, Peter Elliott and Jason Staines

Focusing on the externality effects of historic districts, this paper aims to assess and compare the impact of historic district designation on the value of residential…

Abstract

Purpose

Focusing on the externality effects of historic districts, this paper aims to assess and compare the impact of historic district designation on the value of residential vacant land property.

Design/methodology/approach

Hedonic regression is used to analyze data from 4,233 residential vacant site transactions to measure the influence of historic district designation on the price of residential vacant site properties.

Findings

Results support established theory and research on other residential property types, showing a significant and positive relationship between designation in a historic district and property prices. Residential vacant sites located in a designated historic district sold at a 10-11 per cent premium compared to similar vacant sites not located in a historic district.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study of the influence of historic districts on residential vacant land property. The paper extends limited previous literature on the externality effects of historic districts through detailed analysis of a large Australian housing market (Brisbane).

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2018

Julia Gilbert and Jeong-ah Kim

The purpose of this paper is to explore an identified medication error using a root cause analysis and a clinical case study.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore an identified medication error using a root cause analysis and a clinical case study.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper the authors explore a medication error through the completion of a root cause analysis and case study in an aged care facility.

Findings

Research indicates that medication errors are highly prevalent in aged care and 40 per cent of nursing home patients are regularly receiving at least one potentially inappropriate medicine (Hamilton, 2009; Raban et al., 2014; Shehab et al., 2016). Insufficient patient information, delays in continuing medications, poor communication, the absence of an up-to-date medication chart and missed or significantly delayed doses are all linked to medication errors (Dwyer et al., 2014). Strategies to improve medication management across hospitalisation to medication administration include utilisation of a computerised medication prescription and management system, pharmacist review, direct communication of discharge medication documentation to community pharmacists and staff education and support (Dolanski et al., 2013).

Originality/value

Discussion of the factors impacting on medication errors within aged care facilities may explain why they are prevalent and serve as a basis for strategies to improve medication management and facilitate further research on this topic.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Simon Huston, Clive Warren and Peter Elliott

The purpose of this paper is to develop a General Systems Theory (GST) risk management framework and conducts a preliminary investigation into its potential benefits.

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1276

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a General Systems Theory (GST) risk management framework and conducts a preliminary investigation into its potential benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

A risk management framework with four domains is developed by applying GST to property. Risk management in five listed Australian Real Estate Investment Trusts (A‐REITs) is benchmarked against the GST ideal using public web‐sites information. A‐REIT volatility‐adjusted returns are calculated using Treynor ratios for the year to May 2010. The link between risk management score and entity performance is then investigated.

Findings

The GST framework directs attention to risks involving surveillance, capacity and controls. However, as predicted by the Efficient Market Hypothesis (EMH), the study found no link between assessed risk management and volatility‐moderated annual returns to May 2010.

Research limitations/implications

The risk scoring was predicated on publicly available data, with limited analysis of financial statements. The sample size was restricted.

Practical implications

Successful entities are well governed, focused and innovative. Robust finances allow exploitation of emerging opportunity when business conditions become favourable. Planning and environmental management capabilities are essential.

Originality/value

The paper makes conceptual and practical contributions. Conceptually, it develops a GST risk management framework. Practically, albeit for a handful of entities, the paper illustrates how the GST approach to risk management could be effectively deployed. The paper also outlines a pathway for more refined risk management research.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1972

BC BLOOMFIELD, PAT LAYZELL WARD, EV CORBETT, JON ELLIOTT, JOHN SMITH, PETER LEWIS, HAROLD NICHOLS and CAVAN McCARTHY

RECENTLY I picked up a copy of NEW LIBRARY WORLD and browsed through it, detecting, or so I thought, a certain bias in its editorial approach towards the public librarian…

Abstract

RECENTLY I picked up a copy of NEW LIBRARY WORLD and browsed through it, detecting, or so I thought, a certain bias in its editorial approach towards the public librarian, and mentally discounted most of what I read until, emerging through the advertisements, I came to ‘The Shallow End’. Recognising yet another example of Parkinson's law (journalism expands to fill the space available) and style, I nevertheless, as they graphically say, ‘read on’. It was quickly borne in on me that the feelings expressed by the noxious Thrasher in the March and June issues were, with some modification and emendation, precisely what I uneasily felt in regard to the rôle of modern public library in this country. Both articles raise some very serious points and I thought I might expose some of my jaundiced qualms to the judicious discussion of others more nearly concerned.

Details

New Library World, vol. 73 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Peter Raisbeck

Abstract

Details

Architecture as a Global System: Scavengers, Tribes, Warlords and Megafirms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-655-1

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Book part
Publication date: 27 December 2013

Graham Parkes

The purpose of this chapter is twofold. First, to give a concise account of the current global climate situation, its previous history according to the palaeoclimate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is twofold. First, to give a concise account of the current global climate situation, its previous history according to the palaeoclimate record, and climate scientists’ predictions of the consequences of various scenarios of global climate change. Then to explain why so many people continue to be oblivious to the enormous risks of continuing with business as usual.

Methodology/approach

The approach is through a comprehensive study of the relevant evidence and the scientific and scholarly literature, interwoven with philosophical reflections on their significance.

Findings

The findings are as follows: the evidence for the anthropogenic nature of global warming is overwhelming, and the prognoses for continued burning of fossil fuels (sea level rise, extreme weather, etc.) are dire. The denial stems in large part from the undue influence of climate scepticism movements, lavishly funded by the fossil fuel industries, combined with a variety of psycho-social and economic factors.

Social implications

The implications are several. Given the complex nature of global warming, scientists need to do a better job of communicating their findings to the general public, and scholars and academics need to find ways to expose the machinations of the fossil fuel industries. And given the global impact of climate change, citizens of the developed nations need to see that a radical change in their behaviour is demanded not only by considerations of social justice but also even by their own self-interest.

Originality value

The value of this philosophical approach is that it affords a more comprehensive view of the situation around global warming than we get from the more specialised disciplines.

Details

Environmental Philosophy: The Art of Life in a World of Limits
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-137-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Glasurit Beck, a wholly owned member of the BASF group, has appointed Ted Lade to the newly created position of market development manager for its Building Products…

Abstract

Glasurit Beck, a wholly owned member of the BASF group, has appointed Ted Lade to the newly created position of market development manager for its Building Products Division, based at Slinfold, Horsham.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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