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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Peter Edward Sidorko

The purpose of this article is to analyse an organisational change process that sought to integrate library and other educational support services in an Australian university.

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6054

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to analyse an organisational change process that sought to integrate library and other educational support services in an Australian university.

Design/methodology/approach

The article assesses the organisational change processes using John Kotter's eight step approach as outlined in his book Leading Change.

Findings

While the change processes enjoyed varying degrees of success, it is revealed that several of the techniques recommended by Kotter in his eight steps were adopted, but that the process did not fully utilise the entire eight step process. Questions surrounding the suitability of organisational change models are also raised.

Research limitations/implications

The successful outcomes from the change processes owe credit to Kotter's model for organisational change. While models for change may have certain limitations, they are still revealed as useful in the hands of a skilful leader.

Practical implications

Kotter's eight step model is reviewed in the context of a library change processes. Further analysis of the application of Kotter's model to library change processes may reveal different outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper provides a unique perspective of applying a recognised model for organisational change to library change processes utilising a combination of theory and practice.

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2007

Peter Edward Sidorko

The purpose of this paper is to discuss experiences gained from the introduction of a library leadership institute for Asian academic librarians.

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2519

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss experiences gained from the introduction of a library leadership institute for Asian academic librarians.

Design/methodology/approach

The success of the institute is measured through the evaluations of all participants including, most recently, an attempt to identify challenges faced by academic library leaders, and potential leaders, and assessing how well the institute addresses those challenges.

Findings

While evaluations of the institute are highly positive, there appears to be potential for expanding the institute into two streams, one being strictly leadership and the other drawing mainly on management issues.

Research limitations/implications

While analysis of institute evaluations and comments demonstrates a great deal of satisfaction, further research should be undertaken to identify long‐term benefits gained by participants.

Practical implications

The volatile world of information places many challenges on library leaders in the Asia region. The need for strong leadership is apparent as librarians must draw on a range of skills that are not traditionally taught in library schools and are often difficult to develop in the workplace. The benefits of leadership institutes, while limited, do at least plant a seed for new ideas and ways of thinking.

Originality/value

The paper provides a through analysis of the only Asian academic library leadership institute. It is useful for others considering establishing a similar institute or for those concerned with library professional development in Asia.

Details

Library Management, vol. 28 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Peter Edward Sidorko

This article aims to examine approaches by academic libraries in demonstrating return on investment (RoI).

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to examine approaches by academic libraries in demonstrating return on investment (RoI).

Design/methodology/approach

As a participant in a recent international RoI study, the author reviews the various difficulties in developing a suitable methodology.

Findings

Using grant income as the basis for demonstrating RoI, it was found that wide differences in results may be attributable to a number of factors related to the parent organisation, the availability of grant funding and the country of the study.

Research limitations/implications

Further work is necessary to arrive at a suitable methodology for a diverse range of academic libraries.

Practical implications

Library managers are alerted to issues and problems surrounding the development of return on investment methodologies.

Originality/value

This paper will prove useful to librarians considering investing time and other resources in developing methodologies for demonstrating return on investment.

Details

Library Management, vol. 31 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Peter Edward Sidorko

The purpose of this article is to analyze the educational and more specifically, the library and information opportunities afforded through virtual worlds such as Second Life.

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1797

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to analyze the educational and more specifically, the library and information opportunities afforded through virtual worlds such as Second Life.

Design/methodology/approach

The article provides an analysis of virtual world opportunities through a review of relevant literature as well as actual applications of virtual world platforms.

Findings

Virtual worlds have the potential to provide a rich learning and information environment. Despite what many see as limitations, virtual worlds can enhance the learning experience if problematic issues are addressed and if expectations are realistic. For libraries, a unique set of limitations are identified.

Research limitations/implications

The limited availability of library presences in virtual worlds prohibits a full scale analysis of the success or otherwise of such projects. Future analyses of virtual worlds, in particular Second Life, will be useful if their pervasiveness increases.

Practical implications

Library managers are alerted to issues and problems surrounding an investment in virtual worlds.

Originality/value

This paper will prove useful to educators and librarians considering investing time and other resources in developing content in virtual worlds.

Details

Library Management, vol. 30 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Peter Edward Sidorko and Esther Woo

The purpose of this paper is to highlight a series of initiatives generated from, and managed within, a major university library and aimed at improving a customer service focus.

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4469

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight a series of initiatives generated from, and managed within, a major university library and aimed at improving a customer service focus.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper documents a series of approaches, including a customized staff training package, that were intended to enhance users' experience with staff. Over a period of six years the responses to a biannual user survey were tracked in order to identify improvements, or otherwise, in users' perceptions of staff performance in terms of their customer service.

Findings

The survey results seem to indicate that improvements in users' perceptions of staff performance have improved with time and have done so most dramatically following a series of self‐initiated workshops conducted by library staff.

Research limitations/implications

While it is difficult to directly correlate the successful outcomes with the initiatives, including the staff‐conducted workshops, it will be necessary to continue to track users' perceptions of staff to ascertain whether the trend is sustainable or an aberration.

Originality/value

The paper provides a unique perspective of applying a range of approaches aimed at improving the user experience with staff in a major Asian university library. The success of these approaches is linked to the outcomes of the library's biannual user survey.

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2009

Peter Edward Sidorko and Tina Tao Yang

The purpose of this paper is to describe the changes adopted in a major Asian academic library aimed at making the library more responsive to evolving and growing client…

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2651

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the changes adopted in a major Asian academic library aimed at making the library more responsive to evolving and growing client needs, and to positioning the library as a key player on campus in terms of teaching and learning support.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a period of organizational restructuring, the library embarked on a series of client focused services specifically aimed at enhancing its role in teaching and learning support.

Findings

The article draws on a number of previously existing and new services introduced by the library, and demonstrates growth in their usage. Further evidence of success is highlighted through three consecutive biannual user survey results which demonstrate an increasing responsiveness to user expectations.

Research limitations/implications

While many of the new services have been well received, the findings require further examination to ensure that the services continue to create value for the organization and that the library sustains its role.

Practical implications

This paper reinforces the perspective that, in order to succeed and remain relevant, academic libraries must continue to evolve and to position themselves within their organizations so that they are recognized as important players in teaching and learning processes.

Originality/value

This article provides one possible model for other libraries to follow in attempting to reposition themselves within their organizations.

Details

Library Management, vol. 30 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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