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Article

Peter Dalton, Glen Mynott and Michael Shoolbred

The paper, based on the findings of the Library and Information Commission (LIC) report on Cross‐sectoral Mobility in the LIS Profession, considers some of the barriers to…

Abstract

The paper, based on the findings of the Library and Information Commission (LIC) report on Cross‐sectoral Mobility in the LIS Profession, considers some of the barriers to career development within the Library and Information Services profession. It focuses specifically upon difficulties experienced by LIS professionals in moving to different sectors of the profession. It discusses issues such as professional segregation; employer prejudice; poor employment strategies; lack of confidence among LIS professionals; training; and lack of professional support. In addition to outlining some of the barriers to the career development of LIS professionals, the paper offers a number of recommendations for employers, professional bodies and LIS professionals that may help to alleviate many of these barriers.

Details

Library Review, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article

Veronica Coatham, Suzanne Lazarus and Peter Dalton

Using the example of the social housing sector, this paper seeks to evaluate the experiences of one organisation in attempting to learn more about a traditionally…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the example of the social housing sector, this paper seeks to evaluate the experiences of one organisation in attempting to learn more about a traditionally difficult to reach and engage group – young people – in order to develop more tailored services.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was undertaken as part of a Higher Education Funding Council for England‐funded University “Service by Design programme”, which was designed to enable the transfer of knowledge between the university and external agencies to improve service design. For this project, a focus group approach was adopted to capture the views of housing practitioners and young people. This was underpinned by reference to published literature and data held by the organisation.

Findings

The research led to an improved understanding of the attitudes and behaviours of young people, requiring service delivery staff and heads of departments to examine and change a number of organisational policies and practices. In addition, the research project contributed to evolving cultural change within the organisation and how young people were regarded.

Research limitations/implications

The research was undertaken in partnership with one organisation and hence may have limited transferability. However, the findings reflect those of other more comprehensive studies referred to in this paper.

Practical implications

The paper argues that “customer insight” should underpin excellent customer service. Without a deeper understanding of diverse customer profiles and behaviours, attempts to improve service provision and customer relationships will have limited success.

Originality/value

The paper makes a contribution to ongoing public debates about how young people are currently perceived and about public sector reforms.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article

Qiulin Ke, David Isaac and Peter Dalton

This paper seeks to investigate the factors influencing the business performance of estate agency in England and Wales.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate the factors influencing the business performance of estate agency in England and Wales.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper investigates the effect of housing market, company size and pricing policy on business performance in the estate agency sector in England and Wales. The analysis uses the survey data of Woolwich Cost of Moving Survey (a survey of transactions costs sponsored by the Woolwich/Barclays Bank) from 2003 to 2005 to test the hypothesis that the business performance of estate agency is affected by industry characteristics and firm factors.

Findings

The empirical analysis indicates that the business performance of estate agency is subject to market environment volatility such as market uncertainty, housing market liquidity and house price changes. The firm factors such as firm size and the level of agency fee have no explanatory power in explaining business performance. The level of agency fee is positively associated with firm size, market environment and liquidity.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to the data received and is based on a research project on transaction costs designed prior to this analysis.

Originality/value

There is little other research that investigates the factors determining the business performance of estate agency, using consecutive data of three years across England and Wales. The findings are useful for practitioners and/or managers to allocate resources and adjust their business strategy to enhance business performance in the estate agency sector.

Details

Property Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Book part

Emily C. Bouck and Sara Flanagan

The chapter Technological Advances in Special Education provides information on advances of technology and how such technological advances have influenced students with…

Abstract

The chapter Technological Advances in Special Education provides information on advances of technology and how such technological advances have influenced students with disabilities and special education across the globe. The chapter presents technological advances that benefited students with disabilities in developed countries as well as potential technologies to support students with disabilities in developing countries. The scant exiting literature on developing countries suggests some universal themes regarding technology for students with disabilities including access and training. Additional attention and research is needed on assistive technology to support students with disabilities in both developed and developing countries, with recognition that what works is developed counties may not work in developing.

Details

Special Education International Perspectives: Biopsychosocial, Cultural, and Disability Aspects
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-045-2

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Article

Michelle Miller-Day, Janelle Applequist, Keri Zabokrtsky, Alexandra Dalton, Katherine Kellom, Robert Gabbay and Peter F. Cronholm

The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) has become a dominant model of primary care re-design. This transformation presents a challenge to many care delivery…

Abstract

Purpose

The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) has become a dominant model of primary care re-design. This transformation presents a challenge to many care delivery organizations. The purpose of this paper is to describe attributes shaping successful and unsuccessful practice transformation within four medical practice groups.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a larger study of 25 practices transitioning into a PCMH, the current study focused on diabetes care and identified high- and low-improvement medical practices in terms of quantitative patient measures of glycosylated hemoglobin and qualitative assessments of practice performance. A subset of the top two high-improvement and bottom two low-improvement practices were identified as comparison groups. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with diverse personnel at these practices to investigate their experiences with practice transformation and data were analyzed using analytic induction.

Findings

Results show a variety of key attributes facilitating more successful PCMH transformation, such as empanelment, shared goals and regular meetings, and a clear understanding of PCMH transformation purposes, goals, and benefits, providing care/case management services, and facilitating patient reminders. Several barriers also exist to successful transformation, such as low levels of resources to handle financial expense, lack of understanding PCMH transformation purposes, goals, and benefits, inadequate training and management of technology, and low team cohesion.

Originality/value

Few studies qualitatively compare and contrast high and low performing practices to illuminate the experience of practice transformation. These findings highlight the experience of organizational members and their challenges in practice transformation while providing quality diabetes care.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article

Peter K. Mills and Dan R. Dalton

While labour arbitration is established as the final stage of disputeresolution in virtually every collective bargaining agreement, there hasbeen no attention focusing on…

Abstract

While labour arbitration is established as the final stage of dispute resolution in virtually every collective bargaining agreement, there has been no attention focusing on its role in the service sector. Relying on five years of arbitration data, examines the categories in which arbitration cases arise as well as their outcomes. Finds that disciplinary issues pertaining to absenteeism, dishonesty, drug/alcohol abuse, and insubordination comprised the majority of cases arbitrated for the service sector firms examined.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article

Richard A. Cosier and Dan R. Dalton

Research relying on laboratory protocol and case studies has demonstrated positive effects from cognitive conflict and controversy. Reported benefits have included better…

Abstract

Research relying on laboratory protocol and case studies has demonstrated positive effects from cognitive conflict and controversy. Reported benefits have included better judgments, improved strategic decisions and a better understanding of others' positions. This study develops and assesses the psychometric properties of an instrument designed to examine decision conflict in field settings. This instrument was administered on site to 63 managers. Factors identified in the instrument were disagreement, openness, and control. Interestingly, the openness dimension was positively associated with job commitment. The control factor was inversely associated with job satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article

Kristy Trautmann, Jill K. Maher and Darlene G. Motley

The purpose of this study is to explore the intersection between managers' learning strategies and their organizational leadership practices in a nonprofit context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the intersection between managers' learning strategies and their organizational leadership practices in a nonprofit context.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey methodology was utilized including items from the multi‐factor leadership questionnaire and the learning tactics inventory. The survey was administered to a sample of nonprofit professional at various managerial levels.

Findings

Findings illustrate that effective learning from experience is significantly predictive of transformational leadership. Further analysis reveals that frequent use of thinking and action learning strategies have positive and significant relationship to transformational leadership in nonprofit managers.

Research limitations/implications

Numerous authors have discussed the connections between effective learning and transformational leadership, but there has been insufficient empirical research to investigate the nature of this relationship. Brown and Posner's preliminary research found a strong correlation between learning and leadership but did not specifically examine transformational leadership. This study extends the literature by empirically testing each of four learning strategies and their relationship to transformational leadership. This extension is applied in a nonprofit context, which supports the transfer of for‐profit human resource management tools to the nonprofit environment. Limitations include a convenience sampling method. The study also provides human resource managers with career development tools in order to assess managers' learning styles then foster the learning styles that positively impact transformational leadership behaviors.

Originality/value

This study makes an important contribution to the empirical link between transformational leadership and learning.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part

Llewella Chapman

On 2 September 2015, it was announced that Tom Ford would again be ‘dressing James Bond’, Daniel Craig, in Spectre (Mendes, 2015) after tailoring his suits for Quantum of

Abstract

On 2 September 2015, it was announced that Tom Ford would again be ‘dressing James Bond’, Daniel Craig, in Spectre (Mendes, 2015) after tailoring his suits for Quantum of Solace (Forster, 2008) and Skyfall (Mendes, 2012). Ford noted that ‘James Bond epitomises the Tom Ford man in his elegance, style and love of luxury. It is an honour to move forward with this iconic character’.

  With the press launch of ‘Bond 25’(and now titled No Time to Die) on 25 April 2019, it is reasonable to speculate that Ford will once again be employed as James Bond’s tailor of choice, given that it is likely to be Craig’s last outing as 007. Previous actors playing the role of James Bond have all had different tailors. Sean Connery was tailored by Anthony Sinclair and George Lazenby by Dimitro ‘Dimi’ Major. Roger Moore recommended his own personal tailors Cyril Castle, Angelo Vitucci and Douglas Hayward. For Timothy Dalton, Stefano Ricci provided the suits, and Pierce Brosnan was dressed by Brioni. Therefore, this chapter will analyse the role of tailoring within the James Bond films, and how this in turn contributes to the look and character of this film franchise more generally. It aims to understand how different tailors have contributed to the masculinity of Bond: an agent dressed to thrill as well as to kill.

Details

From Blofeld to Moneypenny: Gender in James Bond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-163-1

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